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Rock - Verschenen op 1 november 2019 | Rhino - Elektra

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The rock’n’roll history books have often considered The Soft Parade to be The Doors’ worst album. Fifty years after its release on the 18th of July 1969, a re-evaluation of the Californians’ fourth opus establishes itself. Exactly a year after Waiting for the Sun, The Doors changed their modus operandi with an album which was viscerally less rock’n’roll. Unmanageable, completely obsessed with his poetry, more and more dependant on alcohol and always seemingly on the brink of leaving the band (held back in extremis by the keyboard player Ray Manzarek), Jim Morrison only wrote half of the tracks on this album. The guitarist Robbie Krieger stepped up to the mark and took the helm writing-wise, as well as developing the band’s instrumentation. Headed by Paul Harris, brass and strings make an unexpected appearance in the band’s sound. Notes of jazz dilute the pure rock sound and bring a more bluesy texture, as well as some pop and even some lounge-style sequences. An eclectic mix which is slightly confusing to begin with, but it stops The Doors’ unique singularity from dwindling. The melodies on The Soft Parade are peraps not of the same calibre as those on the three previous albums, but at an era when the competition was also experimenting with some stranger sounds, Jim Morrison, Ray Manzarek, Robby Krieger and John Densmore prove that they too can steer rock music into uncharted territories. This 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition offers a new remastered version from producer Bruce Botnick, as well as bonus tracks like Who Scared You, as well as some unedited tracks, like demo versions of Doors Only, versions without brass or strings of Tell All the People, Touch Me, Wishful Sinful and Runnin’ Blue. Finally, among all these exciting new features of this 2019 edition, some interesting new guitar sections added by Krieger to Touch Me, Wishful Sinful and Runnin’ Blue. All in all, enough unedited material to please fans and better understand this musical mystery. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Pop - Verschenen op 12 juli 2019 | Rhino - Elektra

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Instrumental and vocal firepower, the considerable ears of engineer Greg Ladanyi, and some magical mixing at the Sound Factory in Hollywood, combined to create the best known album of Jackson Browne's long career, reissued here in gloriously detailed and dynamically thrilling high resolution sound. Russ Kunkel's drum break at the climatic shift of the title track. David Lindley's mournful fiddle in "The Road." Rosemary Butler's soaring vocal solo in "Stay." A song list heavy with covers. Jackson Browne on piano. An extraordinary example of utterly masterful sequencing. Sometimes a band is in such a groove that it demands to be captured live. But making a live album that reflects being on the road, recorded literally on the road? Cutting tracks in a Holiday Inn room in Edwardsville, IL, or on a moving tour bus, complete with grinding gears? Even today with all the digital advances in home recording gear, it still seems like a disaster in the making. In addition, none of the material had ever appeared on a Browne studio record. A shambling cover of Rev. Gary Davis's "Cocaine" and a rendition of Maurice Williams' (The Zodiacs) "Stay"—with David Lindley memorably singing the falsetto part—are both knockouts. "You Love the Thunder," recorded live in Holmdel, NJ, is a classic Jackson Browne love song, one of the last before he turned to political themes. And then there’s the album's heart: the epic Lowell George/Browne/Valerie Carter collaboration, "Love Needs a Heart." It's the one tune worth having the entire record for: "Love needs a heart/And I need to find/If love needs a heart like mine." As this fresh remastering proves again, Browne and his merry band of SoCal pros better known as The Section drew a masterpiece out of the hat with Running on Empty. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Pop - Verschenen op 21 juni 2019 | Rhino - Elektra

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Pop - Verschenen op 30 mei 2019 | Rhino - Elektra

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Pop - Verschenen op 9 november 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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Pop - Verschenen op 9 november 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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Pop - Verschenen op 5 november 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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Pop - Verschenen op 5 november 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Verschenen op 2 november 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Verschenen op 2 november 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Verschenen op 14 september 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

In 1967 the world hadn’t fully digested the Doors’ astounding first album that they had already released Strange Days. Strange like these compositions that sounded like no other. Staggering, often dreamlike themes. And while Jim Morrison sang that people were strange, the same could be said about his Doors: incessant changes in rhythm, lyrics going back and forth between social critic and complete madness, and huge gaps between total trance and cabaret ballads… Months went by and Morrison was growing more and more out of control. In early 1968, the Doors nevertheless started working on their Waiting for the Sun. There are many anecdotes about these most chaotic weeks. Yet, upon its release in July, in the midst of the Vietnam War, fans appropriated pacifist anthem The Unknown Soldier and perky Hello, I Love You that opens this third album and propelled it to the top of the charts. Well aware of their leader’s unstable state, Ray Manzarek, Robby Krieger and John Densmore remained focused to create original and inspired parts. A notch below the two previous albums, Waiting for the Sun however approaches psychedelic music with the same unwavering originality. The use of acoustic instruments and refinement of some arrangements confirm the uniqueness of this band, even though it was on the verge of imploding…In celebration of the album’s 50th anniversary, this deluxe edition offers a new version of the album’s stereo mix, remastered by Bruce Botnick, the Doors’ long-time sound engineer and producer. Without omitting 14 bonus tracks: nine come from recently discovered rough mixes and five originate from a concert in Copenhagen in December 1968. The new stereo mix for Waiting for the Sun, remastered by Botnick, gives a new dimension to songs like The Unknown Soldier and Spanish Caravan. As for the rough mixes, his opinion is clear: “I prefer some of these rough mixes to the finals, as they represent all of the elements and additional background vocals, different sensibilities on balances, and some intangible roughness, all of which are quite attractive and refreshing”. © Max Dembo/Qobuz

Rock - Verschenen op 31 juli 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Verschenen op 31 juli 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Verschenen op 31 juli 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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Pop - Verschenen op 30 maart 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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When Heartbeat City was released in March 1984, the Cars were already the proud owners of a few platinum-selling albums thanks to a rather original musical identity for their time. Acting as the missing link between the Ramones and Elvis Costello with a touch of Roxy Music, Ric Ocasek & Co. provided an ode to pop-punk music from their very first album in 1978. A sort of new wave made in America respectful of the rock’n’roll of yesteryear… The year 1984 also marked the birth of a new TV channel that would revolutionise pop and rock music by becoming an eminently influential media for music videos. The Cars were savvy enough to jump on this video bandwagon and their fifth album was strongly supported by MTV that played You Might Think and Magic on repeat, their two hit anthems that reached the top of rock charts. Undeniably talented for melodies that hit the spot and catchy choruses (their ballad Drive is a formidably languid slow), Ocasek once again releases a beautiful bubble-gum soundtrack of 1980s America. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Verschenen op 30 maart 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

When Heartbeat City was released in March 1984, the Cars were already the proud owners of a few platinum-selling albums thanks to a rather original musical identity for their time. Acting as the missing link between the Ramones and Elvis Costello with a touch of Roxy Music, Ric Ocasek & Co. provided an ode to pop-punk music from their very first album in 1978. A sort of new wave made in America respectful of the rock’n’roll of yesteryear… The year 1984 also marked the birth of a new TV channel that would revolutionise pop and rock music by becoming an eminently influential media for music videos. The Cars were savvy enough to jump on this video bandwagon and their fifth album was strongly supported by MTV that played You Might Think and Magic on repeat, their two hit anthems that reached the top of rock charts. Undeniably talented for melodies that hit the spot and catchy choruses (their ballad Drive is a formidably languid slow), Ocasek once again releases a beautiful bubble-gum soundtrack of 1980s America. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Verschenen op 30 maart 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Verschenen op 23 februari 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

From 26 to 30 August 1970, rock'n'roll fans from across the world had their gaze locked on the Isle of Wight, where a festival was underway that brought together 600,000 spectators and whose stage saw Jimi Hendrix, Miles Davis, the Who, Sly & The Family Stone, Joni Mitchell, Ten Years After, Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Free, Donovan, the Moody Blues, Joan Baez, Leonard Cohen, Jethro Tull and the Doors in one of their final performances, as Jim Morrison had but a year to live... But its success was never assured: and ill omens loomed as the concert began. Treacherous weather, blustery winds, and Morrison's refusal to permit the producers to shine floodlights on the stage, the group or the audience all threatened the event. Not the least of the festival's worries was the fact that Morrison was due to appear in court in Miami a few days before the start, on the latest of many, many obscenity charges. But when they got up on stage, all was forgotten and the Doors magic kicked in immediately! The fury of the instruments was overwhelming. And on the organ, Ray Manzarek's pyrotechnics were as impressive as ever. On the mic, Morrison was simply shamanic. The fourteen minutes of Light My Fire alone justify spending some time and money on this gobsmacking live recording. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Pop - Verschenen op 9 februari 2018 | Rhino - Elektra

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Rock - Verschenen op 24 november 2017 | Rhino - Elektra

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Released in 1976, this fifth album from the Eagles would remain their greatest success. Opened by the eponymous hit single, Hotel California marked a turning point in the career of the American group. Bernie Leadon, the most country-orientated band member, jumped ship and Joe Walsh came on board. For his part, Don Henley also seemed to take more control the business. The result was a much more mainstream record than the album’s predecessors with truly enveloping sounds at the peak of their tracks. Everything is XXL here! The production, the solos, the melodies… everything! A masterpiece of classic rock, this is above all a work that crosses decades and makes the crowds go wild. Glenn Frey, Don Felder, Joe Walsh, Randy Meisner and Don Henley would never again find again such impressive complicity and efficiency… Published in November 2017, this 40th anniversary edition offers an original remastered album as well as an energetic Californian live session recorded at The Forum in Inglewood, October 1976. © CM/Qobuz