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I Choose You

The Steeldrivers

Country - Verschenen op 10 januari 2020 | New Rounder

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Sudden Opera

Pony Bradshaw

Pop - Verschenen op 21 juni 2019 | New Rounder

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On his debut album, Sudden Opera, Pony Bradshaw paints a moody Southern Gothic world full of regret, redemption, loneliness, desire, and heaps of biblical references. A military brat who developed a fondness for literature and the restless soul of a drifter, Bradshaw bounced around through the early part of his adulthood, eventually finding a steady place in North Georgia, where in his early thirties he began playing guitar and writing his first songs. The relative lateness of his musical pursuits meant that he had already experienced a significant portion of life and achieved a certain level of maturity to apply to his songwriting. He also had a pretty great voice well-suited to his gutsy blend of country, blues, and rock. He established himself on the Southern songwriter circuit, put together a self-released album, and eventually earned his way onto the roster of veteran folk and roots label Rounder Records. This is how at age 38, a rookie songwriter named Pony (real name James) came to make his debut album in 2019 with all the depth and weary fortitude of a veteran act. In terms of material, Sudden Opera has a lived-in feel to it that gives songs like the plaintive "Josephine" and the thoughtful "Gaslight Heart" a warmth and approachability even as Bradshaw lets it all hang out emotionally. On "Jehovah," he delivers his incantations with a novelistic wordiness and the staccato rhythms of a rapper, chewing up the dark country landscape with great appetite. Though a dynamic singer and literate wordsmith, Bradshaw's music is pretty standard country-rock fare, and the contemporary grit-neutral patina given to it by his Grammy-winning production team smooths out some of the edges that might have helped its arrangements jump out a bit more. Still, Sudden Opera makes a case for creative late bloomers, as Bradshaw arrives on the scene seemingly in full bloom with plenty to say. © Timothy Monger /TiVo
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Sudden Opera

Pony Bradshaw

Pop - Verschenen op 21 juni 2019 | New Rounder

On his debut album, Sudden Opera, Pony Bradshaw paints a moody Southern Gothic world full of regret, redemption, loneliness, desire, and heaps of biblical references. A military brat who developed a fondness for literature and the restless soul of a drifter, Bradshaw bounced around through the early part of his adulthood, eventually finding a steady place in North Georgia, where in his early thirties he began playing guitar and writing his first songs. The relative lateness of his musical pursuits meant that he had already experienced a significant portion of life and achieved a certain level of maturity to apply to his songwriting. He also had a pretty great voice well-suited to his gutsy blend of country, blues, and rock. He established himself on the Southern songwriter circuit, put together a self-released album, and eventually earned his way onto the roster of veteran folk and roots label Rounder Records. This is how at age 38, a rookie songwriter named Pony (real name James) came to make his debut album in 2019 with all the depth and weary fortitude of a veteran act. In terms of material, Sudden Opera has a lived-in feel to it that gives songs like the plaintive "Josephine" and the thoughtful "Gaslight Heart" a warmth and approachability even as Bradshaw lets it all hang out emotionally. On "Jehovah," he delivers his incantations with a novelistic wordiness and the staccato rhythms of a rapper, chewing up the dark country landscape with great appetite. Though a dynamic singer and literate wordsmith, Bradshaw's music is pretty standard country-rock fare, and the contemporary grit-neutral patina given to it by his Grammy-winning production team smooths out some of the edges that might have helped its arrangements jump out a bit more. Still, Sudden Opera makes a case for creative late bloomers, as Bradshaw arrives on the scene seemingly in full bloom with plenty to say. © Timothy Monger /TiVo
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Live At The CMA Theater In The Country Music Hall Of Fame

The Earls Of Leicester

Country - Verschenen op 22 november 2018 | New Rounder

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Live At The CMA Theater In The Country Music Hall Of Fame

The Earls Of Leicester

Country - Verschenen op 22 november 2018 | New Rounder

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The Other Side

The Lonely Heartstring Band

Country - Verschenen op 21 september 2018 | New Rounder

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Game To Lose

I’m With Her

Folk - Verschenen op 7 september 2018 | New Rounder

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Next Train South

The Po' Ramblin' Boys

Country - Verschenen op 3 augustus 2018 | New Rounder

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Dog On The Floor

Raffi

Enfants - Verschenen op 27 juli 2018 | New Rounder

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Delivery

Mikaela Davis

Alternatif et Indé - Verschenen op 13 juli 2018 | New Rounder

Delivery is the Rounder Records debut of eclectic songwriter, singer, and harp specialist Mikaela Davis. Far from a "harp record," though, Delivery features alternately bluesy and poppy arrangements that present the harp as part of a broader, textured front. The opener, "Delivery," for instance, begins with voice and piano before eventually adding bass and drums, which are played on the album by her touring bandmembers Shane McCarthy and Alex Coté. Harp and fuzzed-out guitar then round out the track's palette. It's a varied album, though, and the contrasting "Do You Wanna Be Mine?" is defined by '80s pop-styled synths, while "Get Gone" drifts into funk. It's the spare acoustic ballad "Emily," however, that proves to be an album highlight, with its rhythmic arpeggiated harp and tight three-part backing harmonies by the Staves. The Staves return for the trippy closer, "Pure Divine Love," a swirly, pitch-bending affair that blends electric and acoustic instruments and their melodic trajectories. The album was produced, recorded, and mixed by none other than John Congleton, who produced for the Decemberists and Kimbra, just to name a couple of projects from the same release year. Spanning, as it does, psychedelia, rootsy pop, synth-centric adult pop, and chamber balladry, what stands out more than the production or even performances on the album are memorable, almost anthemic melodies. For those who stick through the stylistic explorations, the songs underneath not only invite repeat listens but even provide a few earworms. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Indigo Girls Live With The University Of Colorado Symphony Orchestra

Indigo Girls

Pop - Verschenen op 21 juni 2018 | New Rounder

Hi-Res Booklet
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Indigo Girls Live With The University Of Colorado Symphony Orchestra

Indigo Girls

Pop - Verschenen op 21 juni 2018 | New Rounder

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Closer To Fine

Indigo Girls

Pop - Verschenen op 22 juni 2018 | New Rounder

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Half Right

Mikaela Davis

Pop - Verschenen op 22 juni 2018 | New Rounder

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Didn’t He Ramble: Songs Of Charlie Poole

David Davis & The Warrior River Boys

Country - Verschenen op 1 juni 2018 | New Rounder

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See You Around

I’m With Her

Folk - Verschenen op 9 november 2017 | New Rounder

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Songlines Five-star review
Behind the "I’m With Her" name is an alliance of three experts in folk, bluegrass and Americana: Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz and Aoife O’Donovan. These friends, with dense careers behind them (around a dozen solo albums between them) decided to join forces for See You Around. Recorded in Peter Gabriel's Real World in Bath in England with Ethan Johns producing, this orgy of crystalline and sober vocal harmonies is made up of eleven original numbers and one Gillian Welch song (Hundred Miles). The sincere and utterly natural connection between the three women creates a sepia-toned album; an intimate but never monotone symphony of a forgotten America, which they gracefully bring to life through their performances. Watkins on the fiddle and ukulele; Jarosz on mandolin and banjo and O'Donovan on synths, the three wield their instruments of choice with their normal finesse, setting storytelling before instrumental pyrotechnics. Magic. © MZ/Qobuz
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Echo In The Valley

Béla Fleck

Country - Verschenen op 6 oktober 2017 | New Rounder

Hi-Res Booklet
Though banjoists Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn have been playing together since well before they married, it took until 2014 for the pair to record a full duet album together. That self-titled effort was a wild outing full of originals, updated takes on traditional folk songs, and a few compelling covers by composer Béla Bartók. Interestingly, they narrowed the parameters of their music-making for Echo in the Valley. For starters, the entire set comprises originals. And there are no guest musicians -- only two banjos, Washburn's voice, and percussion sounds (feet tapping in the floor or a board). Everything that made the record had to be able to be reproduced in a live setting. It features the pair performing on seven different banjos, ranging from a ukulele banjo to an upright bass banjo, with an emphasis on three-finger and clawhammer styles. The few adaptations of traditional tunes include a stunning version of Clarence Ashley's "My Home's Across the Blue Ridge Mountains," alchemically transformed into a ginhouse blues with Washburn's voice soaring above the pair's stinging runs and fills, with Fleck even utilizing a slide to add gutbucket rawness to the tune. This date also marks the first time the duo have recorded their almost standard live medley "Sally in the Garden/Big Country/Molly Put the Kettle On." Lasting nearly eight minutes, it reveals their symbiotic dialogue to be as emotionally resonant as it is musically deft. While the instrumentals are kinetic, creative, and deeply satisfying, it's the vocal tunes that really make the set stand apart. "Take Me to Harlan," with its shuffling percussion sounds, walks a line between swing, blues, and bluegrass, with Washburn enunciating each syllable with feeling, nuance, and clever acumen. "Don't Let It Bring You Down" is a blues delivered as a fuzzed-out, distorted indie rocker with gorgeous vocal syncopation; its subject deals with collective -- as in societal -- exhaustion experienced by media overload. "If I Could Talk to a Younger Me," inspired by their young son, commences almost like a lullaby, but becomes a Flatt & Scruggs-esque paean to wisdom. Washburn's singing allows the words to fall from her mouth like water and Fleck deliberately understates his fingerpicking style as she covers the rhythm and bass notes. Their reading of Sarah Gunning's "Come All You Coal Miners" finds Washburn channeling Hazel Dickens, while the clawhammer modal breakdown underscores the urgency and tragedy in the lyric. Fleck's playing just oozes mountain soul. The closer, "Bloomin' Rose," is a metaphorical narrative about the environment delivered though vehicles of British and Appalachian folk and hymnody. Stunningly beautiful and haunting, it is an arresting close to a compelling, imaginative album that is sometimes daunting for all the simplicity of its approach. Echo in the Valley is organic music-making at its very best. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Echo In The Valley

Béla Fleck

Country - Verschenen op 6 oktober 2017 | New Rounder

Though banjoists Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn have been playing together since well before they married, it took until 2014 for the pair to record a full duet album together. That self-titled effort was a wild outing full of originals, updated takes on traditional folk songs, and a few compelling covers by composer Béla Bartók. Interestingly, they narrowed the parameters of their music-making for Echo in the Valley. For starters, the entire set comprises originals. And there are no guest musicians -- only two banjos, Washburn's voice, and percussion sounds (feet tapping in the floor or a board). Everything that made the record had to be able to be reproduced in a live setting. It features the pair performing on seven different banjos, ranging from a ukulele banjo to an upright bass banjo, with an emphasis on three-finger and clawhammer styles. The few adaptations of traditional tunes include a stunning version of Clarence Ashley's "My Home's Across the Blue Ridge Mountains," alchemically transformed into a ginhouse blues with Washburn's voice soaring above the pair's stinging runs and fills, with Fleck even utilizing a slide to add gutbucket rawness to the tune. This date also marks the first time the duo have recorded their almost standard live medley "Sally in the Garden/Big Country/Molly Put the Kettle On." Lasting nearly eight minutes, it reveals their symbiotic dialogue to be as emotionally resonant as it is musically deft. While the instrumentals are kinetic, creative, and deeply satisfying, it's the vocal tunes that really make the set stand apart. "Take Me to Harlan," with its shuffling percussion sounds, walks a line between swing, blues, and bluegrass, with Washburn enunciating each syllable with feeling, nuance, and clever acumen. "Don't Let It Bring You Down" is a blues delivered as a fuzzed-out, distorted indie rocker with gorgeous vocal syncopation; its subject deals with collective -- as in societal -- exhaustion experienced by media overload. "If I Could Talk to a Younger Me," inspired by their young son, commences almost like a lullaby, but becomes a Flatt & Scruggs-esque paean to wisdom. Washburn's singing allows the words to fall from her mouth like water and Fleck deliberately understates his fingerpicking style as she covers the rhythm and bass notes. Their reading of Sarah Gunning's "Come All You Coal Miners" finds Washburn channeling Hazel Dickens, while the clawhammer modal breakdown underscores the urgency and tragedy in the lyric. Fleck's playing just oozes mountain soul. The closer, "Bloomin' Rose," is a metaphorical narrative about the environment delivered though vehicles of British and Appalachian folk and hymnody. Stunningly beautiful and haunting, it is an arresting close to a compelling, imaginative album that is sometimes daunting for all the simplicity of its approach. Echo in the Valley is organic music-making at its very best. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Send My Love (To Your New Lover)

I’m With Her

Folk - Verschenen op 29 september 2017 | New Rounder

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Bidin' My Time

Chris Hillman

Country - Verschenen op 22 september 2017 | New Rounder

Hi-Res Booklet
It's hard to imagine a better producer for Chris Hillman than Tom Petty, who pledged a proud allegiance to the Byrds with his 1976 debut. That was the same year Hillman began his solo career, putting both the Byrds and the Flying Burrito Brothers behind him, and if that record didn't burn up the charts, he wound up finding commercial success in the '80s as part of the Desert Rose Band. Once that group ran its course, Hillman and fellow Desert Rose Band member Herb Pedersen settled into a groove where they'd record and tour in a variety of configurations. Pedersen produced The Other Side, the 2005 album Hillman assumed was his farewell, but Pedersen convinced Petty to produce a new record and Hillman agreed, winding up with the warm, wonderful Bidin' My Time. Designed as an intentional stroll through Hillman's back pages, the album opens up with "The Bells of Rhymney," one of several Byrds songs here. "She Don't Care About Time," a song written by Gene Clark, is here alongside the rarity "Here She Comes Again," for which Hillman plays bass for the first time in decades. These are conscious evocations of the Byrds' signature jangle, but on the whole, Bidin' My Time's heart belongs to the burnished folk and country of Hillman's latter-day records. It's a cozy sound, one that feels as intimate as a front porch but is delivered with the precision of seasoned pros, and having old tunes -- including sweet covers of the Everly Brothers' "Walk Right Back" and Tom Petty's "Wildflowers" -- threaded in between the excellent new tunes from Hillman helps make Bidin' My Time feel like an understated summation of everything Hillman's accomplished in his long, varied career. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo