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Opera - Verschijnt op 4 juni 2021 | CapriccioNR

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 7 mei 2021 | CapriccioNR

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“Slightly the audience remember that I’m – as a descendant of writing tonal music – still alive and continue composing” (Walter Braunfels, 1946). Walter Braunfels is a composer whose music died twice: once when the Nazis declared his music “degenerate art”. Then again when post-war Germany had little use for the various schools of tonal music; when the arbiters of taste considered any form of romantic music – almost the whole pre-war aesthetic – to be tainted. This 9th release of Capriccio’s Braunfels Edition shows us also an open-minded composer who experimented with Jazz elements in his Divertimento for Radio-Orchestra in 1929. © Capriccio
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 7 mei 2021 | CapriccioNR

The positive response to Capriccio’s first recording of his Piano Quartet and Piano Quintet has enabled this series to be continued now with three works representative of Labor's oeuvre from the early 1890s. In Vienna, Labor was part of Johannes Brahms’s close circle of friends. Brahms particularly valued his composer colleagues who went their own way without copying him. Labor’s music is very skillfully composed, always sensuous, and first and foremost melodious; it does not require a too complete concentration on itself. A total of around eighty compositions have survived. Among them are practically no occasional works, which is connected to the fact that he was blind: for him composition was a luxury, insofar as he had to rely on the help of a scribe who had to commit the work to paper. © Capriccio
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 7 mei 2021 | CapriccioNR

Nowadays Charles Villiers Stanford’s fame is largely based on his teaching activities in London while his reputation as a "great composer" has waned considerably. The list of his students reads like a veritable Who’s-Who of British music of the 19th and 20th century. Gustav Holst, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Arthur Bliss, Frank Bridge and several more were taught by Stanford. His œuvre covered a wide variety of sacred and secular music and his works carry within them elements of Irish folklore and mysticism. His many chamber works have a definite air of Brahms about them… never by way of direct quote or paraphrase, but by making Brahms’ style his own. © Capriccio
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 2 april 2021 | CapriccioNR

In Bulgaria, both folk and art music evince an ancient tradition that strikes awe even in some of the great music nations today. The way Pancho Vladigerov incorporated these folk-music themes into his concert pieces shows not only his affinity for them but also suggests that he felt something of a calling to promulgate and champion the folk-traditions of his central European homeland. The most-performed work of Pancho Vladigerov’s is undoubtedly his Bulgarian Rhapsody, Op.16 “Vardar” from 1922. The most outstanding must be his Seven Symphonic Bulgarian Dances, Op. 23 (1931), with which he might have wanted to create a counterpart to Brahms’ Hungarian Dances, Dvorák’s Slavonic Dances, or Grieg’s Norwegian Dances or similar such popular aural nationalistic postcards. © Capriccio
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 2 april 2021 | CapriccioNR

The composers and educators Eugen Werner Velte and Wolfgang Rihm as well as alumni whose music is presented here demonstrate the characteristics of a school. The main function of an institution such as the University of Music Karlsruhe is first and foremost as a site for studies and second, a place for individual composition and pedagogic work. The Karlsruhe School is in no way a forced stylistic unit stubbornly passed along simultaneously as a solidified traditional framework. For 50 years, the University of Music Karlsruhe has radiated as a living, recreative phenomenon of this artistic freedom, extending far into a shared future. In the music of alumni taught by Wolfgang Rihm, ideals of musical freedom and openness continue to resound in concrete form. Jörg Widmann, Rebecca Saunders and Markus Hechtle, among others, contribute to the further development of the unique Karlsruhe School at their professional homes. © Capriccio
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Opera - Verschenen op 2 april 2021 | CapriccioNR

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In the 1920s and 1930s, there was a multi-faceted musical scene in culturally flourishing Czechoslovakia. When we take a look at the works by Pavel Haas, Gideon Klein, Hans Krása, Viktor Ullmann or Erwin Schulhoff, we can perceive a stylistically very similar course, conceivable against the given background as a ‘Prague School’ (as a counter-movement to the ‘Viennese School’). In Schulhoff’s early works, the features are a late Romantic approach influenced by Reger that later developed with an emphasis on rhythm in the direction of Expressionism and Neo-Classicism, also including jazz elements. The starting point is the Don Juan’ story, but the underlying idea in Beneš’ and Schulhoff’s work is not to present the colourful seducer, but the fate of a man driven by his desires and needs who cannot even remotely find happiness and peace in constancy. In his opera, Schulhoff brilliantly manages to find a different dramaturgical approach, on the one hand, and at the same time to pay a kind of alienated homage to Mozart’s work, on the other. © Capriccio
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 5 maart 2021 | CapriccioNR

In 1711 Graupner was already appointed court conductor and he would continue to work in Darmstadt for the rest of his life. Graupner’s focus shifted to sacred vocal music, which explains the sheer abundance of the 1,400-plus cantatas he composed. In 1723 the Leipzig city magistrates were looking for a new cantor at the Thomas School – and wanted him, above all. Alas, Graupner’s patron did not release him from his contract an so they had to hire Bach. Graupner, famous and widely celebrated during his lifetime, was soon thereafter forgotten. As we rediscover and hear more and more of his works, however, the judgement of his contemporaries would appear to us as increasingly germane. The present recording spans the liturgical arc from Maundy Thursday via Good Friday and Easter Sunday to Easter Monday and presents one liturgical work for each of the festive days – and each of them a world premiere recording! © Capriccio
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Koormuziek - Verschenen op 5 maart 2021 | CapriccioNR

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Benno Ammann’s oeuvre reveals influences from impressionism to free tonality, yet he belongs to no stylistic school. The Swiss composer wrote Missa Defensor Pacis in 1946 for the official canonisation, at St. Peter’s in Rome, of Nicholas of Flüe, patron saint of Switzerland. This prestigious commission, with its complex polyphony, countless variations, and use of the cantus firmus technique, is one of the most important and extensive Masses by a Swiss composer for a cappella choir. © Capriccio
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Koormuziek - Verschenen op 5 maart 2021 | CapriccioNR

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Only few testimonies provide us any details about this now little known but once esteemed composer. Born in Coburg, 1735, Anton Schweitzer died 1787 in Gotha, where he had settled following the Weimar palace fire in 1774. Regrettably, only relatively few manuscripts have survived. Some of the works recorded here (which comprise almost the entire existing church music) have been preserved in several copies, which were recently found in different archives in Thuringia. This recording shows us a colorful virtuoso music of an unjustly forgotten composer. © Capriccio
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 5 februari 2021 | CapriccioNR

From the diversity of Bulgarian musical culture Pancho Vladigerov stands out as undoubtedly the most important composer for the musical self-conception of modern Bulgaria. Apart from the piano, which was Pancho Vladigerov’s primary, expertly mastered instrument, the violin was second nearest and dearest to him. Undoubtedly the most popular and most often performed composition of Vladigerov’s is his Bulgarian Rhapsody, Op. 16 “Vardar” (1922) – presented here, for violin solo and orchestra. It appears to genuinely tap into the character of Bulgarian life and absolutely nails a specific aspect of the entire country’s culture. These recordings, produced in the 1970s in Bulgaria, comprise Capriccio's 18-disc Vladigerov Edition that will preserve this colourful music for future generations. Conductor Alexander Vladigerov is the son of Pancho Vladigerov. © Capriccio
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 5 februari 2021 | CapriccioNR

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Of particular importance to Eisler was the principle of synthesis, working with a variety of musical aesthetics, and merging them to an autonomous whole… albeit always with an eye to also wanting to “change the world” with his music. The October Revolution of 1917 and the assumption of power by the Bolsheviks in Russia shaped young Hanns Eisler already for the rest of his life. Later on, in the 1930s after all, there was no topic that preoccupied him more, during the years of exile, than the sustained protest against National Socialism. Eisler wanted to make a musical stance against Fascism with his Opus 50; he wanted to show – together with his collaborating librettist Brecht – that there was not just a Germany Nazis but another, better Germany… driven into Exile or interned in concentration camps. The Deutsche Sinfonie is arguably Eisler's most important composition; she is unique in its ingenious combination of symphony, cantata, and oratorio. © Capriccio
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 5 februari 2021 | CapriccioNR

His monodrama The Diary of Anne Frank (1968) put Grigori Frid on the musical map, beyond the borders of Soviet Russia. Frid was born in the Petrograd (St. Petersburg) of 1915 and had to witness early on how his family fell victim to the seemingly indiscriminate (and in fact deliberately arbitrary) rounds of suppression, arrest, and deportation of the Stalin Regime. His music stands in the aesthetic realm of Dmitri Shostakovich on the one hand, and that of his younger contemporaries Edison Denisov, Sofia Gubaidulina, and Alfred Schnittke on the other. His works finds itself influenced by the great Russian tradition but yearning to find new, modern ways – more in line with international trends in music – of expressing itself. © Capriccio
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 8 januari 2021 | CapriccioNR

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The premiere of the Symphony No. 1 in E major by Hans Rott, written more than 100 years earlier, in 1989 introduced the international music world to a composer who had been unknown or known only by name even to most pundits. His colleagues and friends included the one or two-year younger composers Gustav Mahler and Hugo Wolf. Besides Wagner, Bruckner was the most important model for Rott’s first symphonic work. The symphony is the summum opus the not quite twenty-year-old left behind. It is his first and final finished major work. It is the synthesis of what he had written to date and a proclamation of what might have come. © Capriccio
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 8 januari 2021 | CapriccioNR

Although the originality of his musical language paved the way for Russian modernism, Catoire's work still followed the artistic ideals of Russia and not the new culture of the Soviet Republic. His work is highly expressive and of enormous polyphonic density, greatest expressiveness, fine colors, rhythmic and harmonious scope. Catoire's music was almost never performed and his name remained almost unknown also to expert circles. He left behind 36 works including some symphonic pieces, a piano concerto, chamber music, songs and piano cycles. This music was written in the “fin de siecle”, with its shine and nobility, but also with its fragility. © Capriccio
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 8 januari 2021 | CapriccioNR

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 6 november 2020 | CapriccioNR

Despite a certain inner distance to the Communist regime, Rudolf Wagner-Régeny was considered one of the most distinguished artistic personalities in East Germany. Karl Böhm and Herbert von Karajan were only two of the distinguished conductors to champion his music. Although he himself was not regarded as a stylistic pioneer, the way Wagner-Régeny took up and blended old and new elements formed a highly individual musical diction that might well be defined as a personal style. Genesis (1955/56) is a blend of oratorio and cantata. It was written prior to East Germany’s ambivalent attitude towards the church. The latter represented the strongest opposition to the regime and was discriminated mainly during Walter Ulbricht’s tenure as the chairman of the Central Committee. © Capriccio
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 6 november 2020 | CapriccioNR

From the diversity of Bulgarian musical culture Pancho Vladigerov stands out as undoubtedly the most important composer for the musical self-conception of modern Bulgaria. In the 1920s he worked as a conductor, pianist and composer in close association with Max Reinhardt at the Deutsches Theater Berlin. He also associated with many German-speaking writers, such as Stefan Zweig, Gerhart Hauptmann, Arthur Schnitzler and Hugo von Hofmannsthal as well as with many fellow composers of the time (including Bartók, Kodály, Strauss, Ravel, Glasunov, Hindemith, Schoenberg, Rachmaninov and Szymanowski). In this light, it is difficult to understand why the imaginative and colourful music by the sound wizard does not possess any appropriate status in European concert halls today. However, in his homeland he held a pre-eminent position up to the end of his life. Irrespective of the prevailing political conditions, he was shown the greatest respect by all sides and granted both personal and state recognition. With these recordings, produced in the 1970s in Bulgaria, Capriccio releases an exceptional Vladigerov-Edition (18 releases) to preserve this colourful music also for the next generations. © Capriccio
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 6 november 2020 | CapriccioNR

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 2 oktober 2020 | CapriccioNR

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100 years ago the composer Max Bruch died. His remarkably long life of 82 years covered a period in contemporary history that was determined by scientific progress and comprehensive industrialization, developments that also found expression in art. Shortly after the turn of the century the scandals concerning the compositions by Igor Stravinsky and Arnold Schoenberg were already rocking the musical world, however, Bruch met the tide of events as stoically as a rock: conservative, patriotic and above all unconditionally beholden to Romanticism in music. The present program was recorded during a Max Bruch "Jubilee Concert" in Halle and focused besides the famous Suite on Russian Themes also on the rearly performed Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra. © Capriccio