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Jazz - Verschenen op 19 april 2019 | Blue Engine Records

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 24 januari 1990 | Columbia

On the third of his three standards albums, trumpeter Wynton Marsalis meets up with his father, pianist Ellis Marsalis (along with bassist Reginald Veal and drummer Herlin Riley), for 17 standards and three of his originals (including "In the Court of King Oliver"). Wynton, perhaps because of his father's presence, is very respectful of the melodies, sometimes overly so. The result is that this set is not as adventurous as one would like although Marsalis's beautiful tone makes the music worth hearing. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 31 juli 2007 | Columbia - Legacy

As a staunch jazz classicist and a vociferous champion of its traditions, Wynton Marsalis should seem right at home playing an album of jazz standards. And, in fact, he does. Marsalis is well suited to classic, acoustic sets, in part because of his clear, lyrical tone on the trumpet, but mostly because of his love for the music (Marsalis's aversion to avant garde, fusion, and other experimental takes on the genre is well known). The set list of STANDARDS has many of the usual suspects, including "April in Paris," "A Foggy Day," "Django," and "Caravan." It's clear Marsalis isn't out to radically re-invent these tunes, but rather to give them classic renderings, summoning the ghost of early, acoustic post-bop with an appealing sense of balance, beauty, and technical precision. © TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 9 juni 1985 | Columbia

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Jazz - Verschenen op 7 december 1999 | Columbia

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Jazz - Verschenen op 6 januari 1991 | Columbia

Wynton Marsalis's second of three standard albums was actually released after the third volume. On most of the selections, the brilliant trumpeter is heard in excellent form with his quartet (comprised of pianist Marcus Roberts, bassist Reginald Veal or Robert Hurst and either Herlin Riley or Jeff Watts on drums); tenorman Todd Williams helps out on "I'll Remember April" and altoist Wes Anderson is also added to "Crepuscule with Nellie." Marsalis's tone really makes the ballads worth hearing, and his unusual choice and placement of notes keeps the music stimulating. This mostly bop-oriented set is rounded off by a jaunty version of "Bourbon Street Parade." © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 7 juli 1987 | Columbia

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Jazz - Verschenen op 31 juli 2007 | Columbia - Legacy

As a staunch jazz classicist and a vociferous champion of its traditions, Wynton Marsalis should seem right at home playing an album of jazz standards. And, in fact, he does. Marsalis is well suited to classic, acoustic sets, in part because of his clear, lyrical tone on the trumpet, but mostly because of his love for the music (Marsalis's aversion to avant garde, fusion, and other experimental takes on the genre is well known). The set list of STANDARDS has many of the usual suspects, including "April in Paris," "A Foggy Day," "Django," and "Caravan." It's clear Marsalis isn't out to radically re-invent these tunes, but rather to give them classic renderings, summoning the ghost of early, acoustic post-bop with an appealing sense of balance, beauty, and technical precision. © TiVo
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Ambient / New Age / Easy Listening - Verschenen op 1 januari 1990 | Columbia

Due to some of his statements, Wynton Marsalis gained the reputation of not having much of a sense of humor but the picture of him on this album (plus the music in general) dispelled that notion. Marsalis and his expanded septet (which welcomed such guests as clarinetist Alvin Batiste, baritonist Joe Temperley and, on one song apiece, singers Jon Hendricks and Kathleen Battle) clearly have a good time on this joyous and unpredictable set of holiday cheer. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 januari 1990 | SMCMG

Due to some of his statements, Wynton Marsalis gained the reputation of not having much of a sense of humor but the picture of him on this album (plus the music in general) dispelled that notion. Marsalis and his expanded septet (which welcomed such guests as clarinetist Alvin Batiste, baritonist Joe Temperley and, on one song apiece, singers Jon Hendricks and Kathleen Battle) clearly have a good time on this joyous and unpredictable set of holiday cheer. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 januari 1991 | Columbia

With Wynton Marsalis, exuberance, energy and high-level musicianship is never an issue, but long-windedness can be. This may be one of the best of the trumpeter's mid-sized ensembles, a septet, with pianist Marcus Roberts, trombonist Wycliffe Gordon, saxophonists Wessell Anderson and Todd Williams, bassist Reginald Veal, and drummer Herlin Riley. It is also to the credit of Marsalis that he allows solid group interplay, and much room for his sidemen to not only stretch, but to also include their written works in the repertoire. The problem is for the listener, as the bulk of this material lays in long form, and is more a test for the band's stamina than the pleasure of the beholder. It works in concert, but not on the radio or at home. The 37-plus-minute title track, a grandiose treatise on bittersweet romance, is the most egregious with lengthy solos, tight but verbose ensemble sections, up-and-down dynamics, and rhythmic variations. "The Jubilee Suite" is only 12 minutes, and much more concise, echoing anthemic clarion calls, a hip modern New Orleans groove, and features for the clarinet of Williams and Marsalis. "And the Band Played On" is a processional march, and "Brother Veal" exudes a warm feeling marinated in easy swing, with the clarinet of Williams again a focal point. The last piece, "Sometimes It Goes Like That," is the most complex melody, using the typical variable tempo and melodic devices that make a Marsalis jazz tune fairly recognizable. The cover art and title might indicate this was a blue interlude in the personal life of Marsalis translated into music (and words on the indulgent "Monologue" prelude to the title cut) and self-consciously rendered. It's fine music, but not particularly unique or original. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 18 april 1995 | Columbia

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 21 april 1992 | Sony Classical

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Blues - Verschenen op 28 april 1998 | Columbia

The Midnight Blues is the fifth installment in his ongoing Standard Time series, where he offers his own interpretations of classic American pop, jazz and blues songs. Supported by pianist Eric Reed, bassist Reginald Veal and drummer Lewis Nash, as well as a 31-piece string orchestra, he runs through a number of standards -- "The Party's Over," "It Never Entered My Mind," "Baby, Won't You Please Come Home," "Guess I'll Hang My Tears Out to Dry" and "My Man's Gone Now" -- which are arranged and conducted by Bob Freedman, Marsalis' longtime collaborator. The album falls somewhere between Hot House Flowers and one of the early volumes of Standard Time, as it has a lush sound but remains quite idiosyncratic and quietly adventurous in its arrangements. The result is a lovely, albeit minor, addition to Marsalis' rich catalog. © Leo Stanley /TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 31 oktober 1998 | Sony Classical

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Jazz - Verschenen op 21 juni 1988 | Columbia

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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 januari 1984 | Columbia

Wynton Marsalis, very much in his Miles Davis period, plays quite melodically throughout this ballad-dominated outing with strings. Branford Marsalis (on tenor and soprano), flutist Kent Jordan, pianist Kenny Kirkland, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Jeff Watts are strong assets but it is Wynton's subtle creativity on such songs as "Stardust," "When You Wish Upon a Star," Duke Ellington's "Melancholia," and "I'm Confessin'" that makes this recording special. The arrangements by Robert Freedman generally keep the strings from sounding too sticky and Wynton's tone is consistently beautiful. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 21 juni 2010 | Rampart Street, LLC - Jazz in Marciac

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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 januari 1983 | Columbia

In his early years after leaving Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers, Wynton Marsalis strode forth with this excellent recording, his second as a leader, done in tandem with brother Branford, also out of Blakey's herd. The combination of the two siblings created quite a buzz in the music community, and this recording, which may stand the test of time as his finest, is one of the more solid mainstream jazz statements from the Young Lions movement of the early '80s. Top to bottom, this music sings, swings, simmers, and cooks with a cool verve that, in retrospect, would turn more overtly intellectual over time. A command of dynamics akin to those of Charles Mingus creates a signature sound, heard clearly in the opener, "Knozz-Moe-King," fueled by supercharged bop; the bold, extroverted, and precise trumpeting of the leader; and Kenny Kirkland's complementary piano comping. It could be the best single track of the entire recording career of Wynton. Ranking close behind is the tick-tock drumming of Jeff Watts, informing the pretty albeit dark musings of the brothers during "Fuchsia," and the sighing horns, samba bass of Phil Bowler, and stop-start modernities of an utterly original "The Bell Ringer." A bouncy treatment of the standard "My Ideal" shows Wynton's singing tone through his horn, a great interpretation of Thelonious Monk's "Think of One" is totally sly and slinky in low-register hues, and triplet phrases that have become a staple of the Marsalis musical identity accent "Later," adapted from a phrase similar to "Surrey with the Fringe on Top." At their unified best, Wynton and Branford shine on the tricky "What Is Happening Here (Now)?," a spillover residual of their time with Blakey. Think of One is a definitive statement for Wynton Marsalis, and though other efforts turned much more elaborate, none have been played better -- with more palpable spark and original ideas -- than this fine studio date. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 25 november 1984 | Sony Classical