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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 1 juli 1992 | Geffen

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 1994 | DGC

Onderscheidingen Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 1 januari 2003 | Geffen

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Goo

Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2005 | Geffen

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Sonic Youth entered the 1990s with their place in music history assured. By applying standards of cacophony cribbed from their original No Wave peers and concepts of alternate tuning pioneered by avant-garde classical composers Rhys Chatham and Glenn Branca to ferociously rocking songs, the NYC-based quartet had already renewed the potential of guitar-based rock music. But on Goo, their second major label release, they determined to seize the brass ring of pop stardom without giving up their abrasive sound and owned by no one stance. The hooks of "Dirty Boots" and "Kool Thing" may have been bigger and bolder, but the rackets they churned up on "Mote" and "Scooter and Jinx" (which is composed of the sound of Thurston Moore's guitar amp blowing up) were as dense as ever. All three of the band's singers brought indelible melodies, but a pair of tunes voiced by bassist Kim Gordon most effectively managed to both embrace pop culture and subject it to skeptical analysis. The subject matter of "Tunic (Song For Karen)"—Karen Carpenter's death from anorexia nervosa—was bound to grab attention. But instead of a punk trashing of an MOR figure, it delivers an astute and compassionate view of the family dynamics that contributed to Carpenter's illness. The song's image of Carpenter jamming in a heavenly band with Jimi Hendrix pushed back against sexist diminutions of her talents. And "Kool Thing" simultaneously celebrated the rapper LL Cool J, took him to task for his sexism, and poked a little fun at Gordon's own politics. Grand Funk Railroad may have proclaimed, "We're an American Band," but Goo may be the most American record album ever. For what could be more American than wanting to have it all? © Bill Meyer/Qobuz
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Goo

Rock - Verschenen op 26 juni 1990 | Geffen

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Sonic Youth entered the 1990s with their place in music history assured. By applying standards of cacophony cribbed from their original No Wave peers and concepts of alternate tuning pioneered by avant-garde classical composers Rhys Chatham and Glenn Branca to ferociously rocking songs, the NYC-based quartet had already renewed the potential of guitar-based rock music. But on Goo, their second major label release, they determined to seize the brass ring of pop stardom without giving up their abrasive sound and owned by no one stance. The hooks of "Dirty Boots" and "Kool Thing" may have been bigger and bolder, but the rackets they churned up on "Mote" and "Scooter and Jinx" (which is composed of the sound of Thurston Moore's guitar amp blowing up) were as dense as ever. All three of the band's singers brought indelible melodies, but a pair of tunes voiced by bassist Kim Gordon most effectively managed to both embrace pop culture and subject it to skeptical analysis. The subject matter of "Tunic (Song For Karen)"—Karen Carpenter's death from anorexia nervosa—was bound to grab attention. But instead of a punk trashing of an MOR figure, it delivers an astute and compassionate view of the family dynamics that contributed to Carpenter's illness. The song's image of Carpenter jamming in a heavenly band with Jimi Hendrix pushed back against sexist diminutions of her talents. And "Kool Thing" simultaneously celebrated the rapper LL Cool J, took him to task for his sexism, and poked a little fun at Gordon's own politics. Grand Funk Railroad may have proclaimed, "We're an American Band," but Goo may be the most American record album ever. For what could be more American than wanting to have it all? © Bill Meyer/Qobuz
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Goo

Rock - Verschenen op 26 juni 1990 | Geffen

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Sonic Youth entered the 1990s with their place in music history assured. By applying standards of cacophony cribbed from their original No Wave peers and concepts of alternate tuning pioneered by avant-garde classical composers Rhys Chatham and Glenn Branca to ferociously rocking songs, the NYC-based quartet had already renewed the potential of guitar-based rock music. But on Goo, their second major label release, they determined to seize the brass ring of pop stardom without giving up their abrasive sound and owned by no one stance. The hooks of "Dirty Boots" and "Kool Thing" may have been bigger and bolder, but the rackets they churned up on "Mote" and "Scooter and Jinx" (which is composed of the sound of Thurston Moore's guitar amp blowing up) were as dense as ever. All three of the band's singers brought indelible melodies, but a pair of tunes voiced by bassist Kim Gordon most effectively managed to both embrace pop culture and subject it to skeptical analysis. The subject matter of "Tunic (Song For Karen)"—Karen Carpenter's death from anorexia nervosa—was bound to grab attention. But instead of a punk trashing of an MOR figure, it delivers an astute and compassionate view of the family dynamics that contributed to Carpenter's illness. The song's image of Carpenter jamming in a heavenly band with Jimi Hendrix pushed back against sexist diminutions of her talents. And "Kool Thing" simultaneously celebrated the rapper LL Cool J, took him to task for his sexism, and poked a little fun at Gordon's own politics. Grand Funk Railroad may have proclaimed, "We're an American Band," but Goo may be the most American record album ever. For what could be more American than wanting to have it all? © Bill Meyer/Qobuz
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Rock - Verschenen op 22 augustus 2006 | Geffen

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Considering that Sonic Youth lost Jim O'Rourke and found the custom-tweaked, irreplaceable guitars that were stolen in 1999 before heading into the studio to make Rather Ripped, it seemed that the album could be a big departure from what they'd been doing on Murray Street and Sonic Nurse -- possibly a return to the kind of music they could only make with those instruments, or perhaps an entirely different approach that reflected their revamped, old-is-new-again lineup. Rather Ripped ends up being of a piece with their previous two albums, and often plays like a stripped-down, slightly less-inspired Sonic Nurse. Once again, Kim Gordon contributes some of the best tracks here; "Reena" and "Jams Run Free" are equal parts dreamy and driving, while "The Neutral" is a sweet, low-key love song. Thurston Moore contributes a gently but powerfully political track à la Sonic Nurse's "Peace Attack" with "Do You Believe in Rapture?," a reflection on peace and apocalypse that's mostly serene, even if the guitar harmonics throughout the song add shivers of doubt and tension. "Rats" is a standard-issue Lee Ranaldo song, freewheeling and poetic (and with lines like "Let me place you in my past/With other precious toys," it has the sharpest lyrics on Rather Ripped), even if it's not quite as amazing as the previous album's "New Hampshire." Rather Ripped's rock songs are solid, but not amazing -- the interplay of Moore's and Ranaldo's guitars and Steve Shelley's drumming are the best things about "Sleepin' Around" and "What a Waste." Actually, the more atmospheric songs end up being some of the most compelling. "Lights Out" reeks of whispery, late-night cool, and the closing track, "Or," is one of the sparest and most oddly unsettling songs Sonic Youth has done in a while (not to mention a reminder that quiet doesn't always mean peaceful in this band's world). Rather Ripped is also surprisingly lean, with the songs on its first half feeling so tightly structured that they seem like radio edits. Only "Turquoise Boy" and "Pink Steam" really open up and deliver Sonic Youth's famously sprawling, jam-based sound. If Rather Ripped is a tiny bit disappointing, it's only because the band's playing outpaces their songwriting ever so slightly. It's a solidly good album, and if taken as part of a trio of albums with Sonic Nurse and Murray Street, it shows that Sonic Youth is still in a comfortable yet creative groove, not a rut. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 oktober 1995 | Geffen

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After the regressive, low-key Experimental Jet Set, Trash & No Star, Sonic Youth appeared to be floundering somewhat, but Washing Machine erased any notion that the band had run out of things to say. Easily their most adventurous, challenging, and best record since Daydream Nation, the album finds Sonic Youth returning to the fearless exploration of their SST records, but the group has found a way to work that into tighter song structures. Not only are the songs more immediate than most of the material on their earlier records, the sound here is warm and open, making Washing Machine their most mature and welcoming record to date. It's not a commercial record, nor is it a pop record, but Washing Machine encompasses everything that made Sonic Youth innovators, and shows that they can continue to grow, finding new paths inside their signature sound. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 8 juni 2004 | Geffen

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Picking up where Murray Street's languid experimentalism left off, Sonic Youth's somewhat awkwardly named Sonic Nurse shows that the band still sounds revitalized, and may have even tapped into a more fruitful creative streak than they did on their previous album. Anyone who has stuck with Sonic Youth this long knows more or less what to expect from them, but the group still has the potential to surprise; one of Sonic Nurse's biggest surprises is the return of Kim Gordon. She had a relatively limited presence on NYC Ghosts & Flowers and Murray Street, but she's back in a big way on this album, contributing four tracks; not coincidentally, Gordon's songs are among the strongest on the album. "Pattern Recognition" gets Sonic Nurse off to a strong start and ranks among her best rock songs, falling somewhere between "Kool Thing" and "Bull in the Heather" in its icy-hot appeal. Her quieter songs have just as much impact: "Dude Ranch Nurse" boasts an oddly timeless guitar lick and lyrics ("Let me ride you till you fall/Let's pretend that there's nothing at all") that blur the line between alluring and nihilistic. "I Love You Golden Blue" is another standout, a beautiful but bleak ballad with ghostly vocals that recall Nico at her most fragile. Of course, the rest of the band finds moments to shine: Thurston Moore's "Dripping Dream" begins as absurdist, angular rock (although he still has the ability to make phrases like "We've been searching for the cream dream wax" sound like the coolest thing ever) and stretches out into a beautiful epic, with the interplay of feedback and guitar lines giving it a comet-tail majesty. "Paper Cup Exit," the requisite Lee Ranaldo track, has a sharper-edged mix of noise and melody than most of Sonic Nurse. Another of the album's surprises is how much of its inspiration seems to come from the band's late-'80s/early-'90s material. It's not just that the band slams George W. Bush on the mellow protest song "Peace Attack," just as Dirty's "Youth Against Fascism" railed against the first President Bush, or that they peer into the void of pop culture on "Kim Gordon and the Arthur Doyle Hand Cream" as they did on Goo's Karen Carpenter tribute, "Tunic." On songs like "New Hampshire" -- which could pass for a lost track from Daydream Nation -- Sonic Youth actually sound younger and more enthusiastic than they have in a few albums. All told, this album is probably the band's best balance of pop melodies and avant-leaning structures since Washing Machine; even if it doesn't rank among their most ambitious work, Sonic Nurse sounds like the kind of album Sonic Youth should be making at this point in their career. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 juni 2002 | Geffen

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 mei 1998 | Geffen

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Truth be told, the grunge era never quite fit Sonic Youth. They may have been at the peak of their popularity, but they had traded their experimentalism for sheer, bracing noise. It may have sounded good, but ultimately Dirty didn't have the cerebral impact of Sister, largely because it was tied to an admittedly effective backbeat. Beginning with Washing Machine, Sonic Youth returned to more adventurous territory, and in 1997, they released a series of EPs that illustrated their bond with such post-rock groups as Tortoise and Gastr del Sol. Those EPs, as well as the epic Washing Machine closer, "The Diamond Sea," provide the foundation for A Thousand Leaves, the band's most challenging and satisfying record in years. The blasts of dissonance that characterized their SST masterworks have been replaced, by and large, by winding, intricate improvisations. There's a surprising warmth to the subdued guitars of Thurston Moore, Lee Ranaldo, and Kim Gordon, which keeps the lengthy songs captivating. Both Moore and Ranaldo concentrate on quiet material, which almost makes Gordon's noisy politicized rants sound a little out of place, but her best moments ("French Tickler," "Heather Angel") have unsettling, unpredictable twists and turns that greatly contribute to the success of A Thousand Leaves. It may be their most cerebral album in ages, but that only makes it all the more engaging. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 8 juni 2009 | Matador

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 7 juni 2019 | Matador

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Goo

Rock - Verschenen op 26 juni 1990 | Geffen

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Sonic Youth entered the 1990s with their place in music history assured. By applying standards of cacophony cribbed from their original No Wave peers and concepts of alternate tuning pioneered by avant-garde classical composers Rhys Chatham and Glenn Branca to ferociously rocking songs, the NYC-based quartet had already renewed the potential of guitar-based rock music. But on Goo, their second major label release, they determined to seize the brass ring of pop stardom without giving up their abrasive sound and owned by no one stance. The hooks of "Dirty Boots" and "Kool Thing" may have been bigger and bolder, but the rackets they churned up on "Mote" and "Scooter and Jinx" (which is composed of the sound of Thurston Moore's guitar amp blowing up) were as dense as ever. All three of the band's singers brought indelible melodies, but a pair of tunes voiced by bassist Kim Gordon most effectively managed to both embrace pop culture and subject it to skeptical analysis. The subject matter of "Tunic (Song For Karen)"—Karen Carpenter's death from anorexia nervosa—was bound to grab attention. But instead of a punk trashing of an MOR figure, it delivers an astute and compassionate view of the family dynamics that contributed to Carpenter's illness. The song's image of Carpenter jamming in a heavenly band with Jimi Hendrix pushed back against sexist diminutions of her talents. And "Kool Thing" simultaneously celebrated the rapper LL Cool J, took him to task for his sexism, and poked a little fun at Gordon's own politics. Grand Funk Railroad may have proclaimed, "We're an American Band," but Goo may be the most American record album ever. For what could be more American than wanting to have it all? © Bill Meyer/Qobuz
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2002 | Geffen

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Rock - Verschenen op 16 mei 2000 | Geffen

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 mei 1998 | DGC

Truth be told, the grunge era never quite fit Sonic Youth. They may have been at the peak of their popularity, but they had traded their experimentalism for sheer, bracing noise. It may have sounded good, but ultimately Dirty didn't have the cerebral impact of Sister, largely because it was tied to an admittedly effective backbeat. Beginning with Washing Machine, Sonic Youth returned to more adventurous territory, and in 1997, they released a series of EPs that illustrated their bond with such post-rock groups as Tortoise and Gastr del Sol. Those EPs, as well as the epic Washing Machine closer, "The Diamond Sea," provide the foundation for A Thousand Leaves, the band's most challenging and satisfying record in years. The blasts of dissonance that characterized their SST masterworks have been replaced, by and large, by winding, intricate improvisations. There's a surprising warmth to the subdued guitars of Thurston Moore, Lee Ranaldo, and Kim Gordon, which keeps the lengthy songs captivating. Both Moore and Ranaldo concentrate on quiet material, which almost makes Gordon's noisy politicized rants sound a little out of place, but her best moments ("French Tickler," "Heather Angel") have unsettling, unpredictable twists and turns that greatly contribute to the success of A Thousand Leaves. It may be their most cerebral album in ages, but that only makes it all the more engaging. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2006 | Geffen

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2006 | Geffen

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 18 maart 2021 | Tanuki