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Folk - Verschenen op 15 februari 2019 | Axster Bingham Records

Since his 2007 album Mescalito, Ryan Bingham has carved out an image of himself as an endearing Americana troubadour. A songwriter who mixes the influences of Steve Earle, Southern rock and Outlaw cowboys, not to mention, in no particular order, Bob Dylan, John Hiatt, the Stones and Jerry Jeff Walker... In 2009, winning an Oscar and a Golden Globe for The Weary Kind (his song for the film Crazy Heart with Jeff Bridges), he turned even more heads with his pretty New Mexico cowboy face. But he never abused these assets to reach a wide audience nor did he change his neo-country style. He’s not that kind of guy… Then things took a turn. Alcohol got the better of his mother and his father committed suicide. With the help of his girlfriend and his hardcore fans, Bingham has gradually resurfaced.The songs on American Love Song are rather excellent and he keeps a stiff upper lip throughout this sixth studio album. Co-produced by the great Charlie Sexton (Dylan's guitarist on even days, a hard-core made in Austin rocker on odd days), American Love Song has the warmth of a seventies country rock record without ever sounding outdated. A few blues or soul scents envelop an efficient and fairly classic production that gives pride of place to guitars. Throughout the ballads and the more up-tempo songs, Bingham speaks sincerely of himself, of those who hang around the emergency stop tape and, for over one hour, he sketches a beautifully eclectic portrait of contemporary America which is as classy as its album cover. ©Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Verschenen op 30 augustus 2010 | Lost Highway Records

On his third album, songwriter Ryan Bingham reveals both confidence and growth. His previous recordings showed promise but were marred by youthful excesses. Bingham won an Oscar for "The Weary Kind," the theme song from the film Crazy Heart. The song was produced by T-Bone Burnett, creating a partnership extended on Junky Star. Bingham and his Dead Horses -- drummer Matthew Smith, bassist Elijah Ford, and guitarist Corby Schaub -- create a sound planted deeply in folk, country, blues, and roots rock. These lyrically direct songs reflect lost, desperate, displaced individuals, all dreaming the same dark dream and all growing tenser with the times -- and some fall over the edge. Bingham has trimmed his songwriting to the bone, while learning to use metaphor and metonymy with a reportorial eye for detail, allowing the power in his words to speak for themselves. He begins articulating his sandblasted vision of America with "The Poet." Amid acoustic guitars, a lonesome harmonica, restrained electric, and bass drum, Bingham's whiskey-soaked vocal articulates a theme the entire album turns on: "As I keep walking, people keep talking/About things they've never seen or done/Homeless sleep in the park, lovers kiss in the dark/Me, myself I keep moving on through town...the poet in the back writes down his songs in blood." Time is suspended as Bingham's road-worn protagonists tell their hardscrabble stories, past and present, physically and psychologically; sometimes their journeys reach tragic ends. In "The Wandering," countrified rock expresses rootlessness as peace of mind, but one wonders if the seeming protagonist isn't just whistling past the graveyard. "Strange Feelin' in the Air," "Junky Star" (one of several murder ballads), and the explosively rockist "Depression" contradict that view: constant movement seems the key to survival, not contentment. "Hallelujah" is a first-person murder ballad from the victim's point of view that is as utterly moving as it is bone-chilling. "Lay My Head on the Rail" is folk poetry. The lyric blues in "Hard Worn Trail" are rooted in poverty, stress, and broken relationships, searching relentlessly for comfort that doesn't arrive. Even the rowdy outlaw country closer, "All Choked Up Again," mines the existential darkness deeper. Bingham is unflinching, his delivery is collected; even when singing passionately he reserves judgment, leaving room for a glimmer on the horizon, but he doesn't expect it. Musically and lyrically rooted in the Americana of the South and West, Junky Star does offer consolation, however: in these 12 songs, desperation is a shared language disseminated by the storyteller; no one need be left alone in it. Bingham mirrors our era in new legends and myths, without distorting or romanticizing it. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 2 oktober 2007 | Lost Highway Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 12 juni 2009 | Lost Highway Records

At the age of 28, Ryan Bingham already sings like he's been howling at the moon in between shots of bourbon and sucking down filterless Chesterfields every night of his life, transplanting the voice of a hard-bitten middle-aged survivor into the body of a guy still young enough to be learning a few things about the world. This disconnect is felt more than once on Roadhouse Sun, Bingham's second major-label album. While Bingham's road-worn voice and tough melodies, which veer between twang-infused rock, rowdy roadhouse blues, and hardscrabble country, certainly sound like the real thing, and his band (Corby Schaub on guitar, Elijah Ford on bass, Matt Smith on drums) has both the chops and the attitude to make these tunes stand up and crow, on Roadhouse Sun Bingham often sounds like he's singing about the stuff he wishes he knew rather than what's really in his heart and mind. It's less a matter of experience than a question of stretching beyond his creative boundaries; between a seriously busted relationship with his family and years touring on the rodeo circuit, Bingham doubtless has plenty of stories to tell, but as much as he tries to emulate the scope and vision of Bob Dylan in a tune he has the nerve to call "Dylan's Hard Rain," he doesn't come especially close to reaching the mark of his stated influence, and the pseudo-psychedelic poesy of "Changes Is" sounds like pothead wisdom that doesn't sound so clever once the buzz wears off, no matter how hard the band rocks behind it. (And with the help of producer Marc Ford, they rock pretty damn hard when they feel it.) And while the common-man rage of "Hey Hey Hurray" is clearly honest and heartfelt, it's too wordy and scattershot to connect. When Bingham does hit the bulls-eye on tunes like "Wishing Well," "Endless Ways," and "Tell My Mother I Miss Her So," it's clear he's a talent to watch, but as a whole, this is an album whose pieces don't quite fall into place as they should. More than a few folks have compared Ryan Bingham to Bruce Springsteen, but Roadhouse Sun sounds like he's still making his Greetings from Asbury Park -- the kind of record whose clunkers are obvious enough to put a chink into the album's very real virtues. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 18 september 2012 | Axster Bingham Records

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Country - Verschenen op 19 januari 2015 | Humphead Records

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 25 juni 2013 | Axster Bingham Records

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Pop - Verschenen op 23 augustus 2019 | Axster Bingham Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 30 augustus 2010 | Lost Highway Records

On his third album, songwriter Ryan Bingham reveals both confidence and growth. His previous recordings showed promise but were marred by youthful excesses. Bingham won an Oscar for "The Weary Kind," the theme song from the film Crazy Heart. The song was produced by T-Bone Burnett, creating a partnership extended on Junky Star. Bingham and his Dead Horses -- drummer Matthew Smith, bassist Elijah Ford, and guitarist Corby Schaub -- create a sound planted deeply in folk, country, blues, and roots rock. These lyrically direct songs reflect lost, desperate, displaced individuals, all dreaming the same dark dream and all growing tenser with the times -- and some fall over the edge. Bingham has trimmed his songwriting to the bone, while learning to use metaphor and metonymy with a reportorial eye for detail, allowing the power in his words to speak for themselves. He begins articulating his sandblasted vision of America with "The Poet." Amid acoustic guitars, a lonesome harmonica, restrained electric, and bass drum, Bingham's whiskey-soaked vocal articulates a theme the entire album turns on: "As I keep walking, people keep talking/About things they've never seen or done/Homeless sleep in the park, lovers kiss in the dark/Me, myself I keep moving on through town...the poet in the back writes down his songs in blood." Time is suspended as Bingham's road-worn protagonists tell their hardscrabble stories, past and present, physically and psychologically; sometimes their journeys reach tragic ends. In "The Wandering," countrified rock expresses rootlessness as peace of mind, but one wonders if the seeming protagonist isn't just whistling past the graveyard. "Strange Feelin' in the Air," "Junky Star" (one of several murder ballads), and the explosively rockist "Depression" contradict that view: constant movement seems the key to survival, not contentment. "Hallelujah" is a first-person murder ballad from the victim's point of view that is as utterly moving as it is bone-chilling. "Lay My Head on the Rail" is folk poetry. The lyric blues in "Hard Worn Trail" are rooted in poverty, stress, and broken relationships, searching relentlessly for comfort that doesn't arrive. Even the rowdy outlaw country closer, "All Choked Up Again," mines the existential darkness deeper. Bingham is unflinching, his delivery is collected; even when singing passionately he reserves judgment, leaving room for a glimmer on the horizon, but he doesn't expect it. Musically and lyrically rooted in the Americana of the South and West, Junky Star does offer consolation, however: in these 12 songs, desperation is a shared language disseminated by the storyteller; no one need be left alone in it. Bingham mirrors our era in new legends and myths, without distorting or romanticizing it. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2009 | Lost Highway Records

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Folk - Verschenen op 6 mei 2016 | Axster Bingham Records

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Originele soundtracks - Verschenen op 22 december 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Blues - Verschenen op 9 september 2016 | Concord Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 23 maart 2018 | Humphead Records

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Folk - Verschenen op 30 november 2018 | Axster Bingham Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 12 juni 2009 | Lost Highway Records

Booklet
At the age of 28, Ryan Bingham already sings like he's been howling at the moon in between shots of bourbon and sucking down filterless Chesterfields every night of his life, transplanting the voice of a hard-bitten middle-aged survivor into the body of a guy still young enough to be learning a few things about the world. This disconnect is felt more than once on Roadhouse Sun, Bingham's second major-label album. While Bingham's road-worn voice and tough melodies, which veer between twang-infused rock, rowdy roadhouse blues, and hardscrabble country, certainly sound like the real thing, and his band (Corby Schaub on guitar, Elijah Ford on bass, Matt Smith on drums) has both the chops and the attitude to make these tunes stand up and crow, on Roadhouse Sun Bingham often sounds like he's singing about the stuff he wishes he knew rather than what's really in his heart and mind. It's less a matter of experience than a question of stretching beyond his creative boundaries; between a seriously busted relationship with his family and years touring on the rodeo circuit, Bingham doubtless has plenty of stories to tell, but as much as he tries to emulate the scope and vision of Bob Dylan in a tune he has the nerve to call "Dylan's Hard Rain," he doesn't come especially close to reaching the mark of his stated influence, and the pseudo-psychedelic poesy of "Changes Is" sounds like pothead wisdom that doesn't sound so clever once the buzz wears off, no matter how hard the band rocks behind it. (And with the help of producer Marc Ford, they rock pretty damn hard when they feel it.) And while the common-man rage of "Hey Hey Hurray" is clearly honest and heartfelt, it's too wordy and scattershot to connect. When Bingham does hit the bulls-eye on tunes like "Wishing Well," "Endless Ways," and "Tell My Mother I Miss Her So," it's clear he's a talent to watch, but as a whole, this is an album whose pieces don't quite fall into place as they should. More than a few folks have compared Ryan Bingham to Bruce Springsteen, but Roadhouse Sun sounds like he's still making his Greetings from Asbury Park -- the kind of record whose clunkers are obvious enough to put a chink into the album's very real virtues. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Folk - Verschenen op 9 januari 2019 | Axster Bingham Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 31 juli 2012 | Axster Bingham Records

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Folk - Verschenen op 1 februari 2019 | Axster Bingham Records

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Country - Verschenen op 12 januari 2015 | Humphead Records