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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 11 april 2014 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 19 april 1994 | Columbia

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 16 juli 2012 | Def Jam Recordings

Booklet Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Music
That's Nas' ex-wife Kelis' wedding dress on the cover: she's a fellow recording artist, the two have a kid together, and she wasn't consulted about the album cover or the album itself. Life Is Good is that kind of album, and for the moment, Nas is that kind of guy. He may have recorded some game-changing albums early on, and his recent collaboration with Damian Marley, Distant Relatives, was vital as well, but this puff-chested bitch session is a completely different animal, coming off as Marvin Gaye's Here, My Dear, although this one prefers playing to radio over playing it as landmark disc, and prefers swaggering over staying on topic. Know that he's willing to take all the credit for his own Illmatic here, too, boasting that he's the best in the game before shooting insults at easy targets and his ex-wife/father-of-his-children, who never should have left because as "Roses" states, "I'm an ass magnet." This trashing without rebuttal is worth arguing about, and snarky and vicious aren't admirable qualities, so the best way to approach this unfiltered carpet bombing of love and marriage is thinking about how heartbreak can make a man go cold (808s & Heartbreak) or in this case, irresponsibly start fires. Well-funded fires, too, as Swizz Beatz's "On to the Next One" soundalike "Summer On Smash" gives Nas a bona fide club killer, and when it comes to headlines, that's the late Amy Winehouse on "Cherry Wine" in one of her last recordings -- on a track as intoxicating as its namesake. Don't let that vicious guy on the cover know that a woman also assists on the album's other truly rich moment, with Mary J. Blige in top form on "Reach Out," while Rick Ross winds up the album's top thug thanks to "Accident Murderers," a majestic street track with No I.D. on production and a reference to Illmatic's Jerome character, even when bringing that one up is sticky, seeing as Life Is Good isn't even in the same ballpark. Still, Nas doesn't seem to care, putting a Jim Jones-styled blast of boss talk called "Nasty" on the same album he pulls the heartstrings on with the well-written personal number "Daughters," but he sells it all, delivering everything here as if its classic status was assured and will never fall into an embarrassment trap, as long as the cover art isn't brought into the debate. If the game needed Illmatic, this is the one Nas needed to get out of his system, acting as a clearinghouse for all venom and bile, plus some gloss that doesn't fit but needed to go as well. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 16 juli 2012 | Def Jam Recordings

Booklet Onderscheidingen Pitchfork: Best New Music
That's Nas' ex-wife Kelis' wedding dress on the cover: she's a fellow recording artist, the two have a kid together, and she wasn't consulted about the album cover or the album itself. Life Is Good is that kind of album, and for the moment, Nas is that kind of guy. He may have recorded some game-changing albums early on, and his recent collaboration with Damian Marley, Distant Relatives, was vital as well, but this puff-chested bitch session is a completely different animal, coming off as Marvin Gaye's Here, My Dear, although this one prefers playing to radio over playing it as landmark disc, and prefers swaggering over staying on topic. Know that he's willing to take all the credit for his own Illmatic here, too, boasting that he's the best in the game before shooting insults at easy targets and his ex-wife/father-of-his-children, who never should have left because as "Roses" states, "I'm an ass magnet." This trashing without rebuttal is worth arguing about, and snarky and vicious aren't admirable qualities, so the best way to approach this unfiltered carpet bombing of love and marriage is thinking about how heartbreak can make a man go cold (808s & Heartbreak) or in this case, irresponsibly start fires. Well-funded fires, too, as Swizz Beatz's "On to the Next One" soundalike "Summer On Smash" gives Nas a bona fide club killer, and when it comes to headlines, that's the late Amy Winehouse on "Cherry Wine" in one of her last recordings -- on a track as intoxicating as its namesake. Don't let that vicious guy on the cover know that a woman also assists on the album's other truly rich moment, with Mary J. Blige in top form on "Reach Out," while Rick Ross winds up the album's top thug thanks to "Accident Murderers," a majestic street track with No I.D. on production and a reference to Illmatic's Jerome character, even when bringing that one up is sticky, seeing as Life Is Good isn't even in the same ballpark. Still, Nas doesn't seem to care, putting a Jim Jones-styled blast of boss talk called "Nasty" on the same album he pulls the heartstrings on with the well-written personal number "Daughters," but he sells it all, delivering everything here as if its classic status was assured and will never fall into an embarrassment trap, as long as the cover art isn't brought into the debate. If the game needed Illmatic, this is the one Nas needed to get out of his system, acting as a clearinghouse for all venom and bile, plus some gloss that doesn't fit but needed to go as well. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 6 augustus 2021 | Mass Appeal

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King's Disease II (2021) is alweer het veertiende studioalbum van Nas. Op de plaat laat de Amerikaanse rapper uit New York zich bijstaan door bekende gastartiesten als Eminem, A Boogie wit da Hoodie, YG, Lauryn Hill en Charlie Wilson. Net als de voorganger King's Disease (2020) produceert Nas ook deze plaat zelf, samen met Hit-Boy. © TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 1 juli 1996 | Columbia

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 21 augustus 2020 | Mass Appeal

Nas has been waiting for his moment. After the heavy criticism of his last album produced by Kanye West, Nasir, he has needed to honour his status as an American rap legend. This time around, he has recruited another producer, a protege of Kanye West: Hit-Boy, known of course for his work with his boss, but also with Jay-Z, A$AP Rocky and Beyonce. On King’s Disease, his thirteenth album, Nas has returned to something fundamentally more down-to-earth, almost as if he has something to excuse himself for. At 46 years old, the Queensbridge native has released 13 tracks that raise questions of what steps need to be taken, life’s low points and past mistakes. It is never too late.Nas has sometimes been reproached for being bogged down with a dated sound, for being musically stubborn. This criticism is no longer valid on his last several albums, including this one. We can hear, for example, the fusion of his deep voice with that of the prince of drill Lil Durk (on Til The War Is Won), or experimentation with trap beats (27 Summers). But Nas is also a product of the 1990s, and continues to remind us of this time, notably by reuniting the members of his old group The Firm (AZ and Foxy Brown) as well as his great childhood friend Cormega on the track Full Circle. Such an event, reuniting the four rappers should bring with it a monumental storm, but it is ultimately the cold atmosphere which comes out on top. King’s Disease is not pretentious: it’s real and true. True in its intention which can be summarised as the denunciation of a capitalist downward spiral and its impact on the individual. It is also true in terms of its balance between eras and the album’s protagonists. It’s the return of a very good Nas to the great delight of rap aesthetes. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 2 juli 2021 | Columbia

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 18 december 2001 | Columbia

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 21 augustus 2020 | Mass Appeal Records

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Nas has been waiting for his moment. After the heavy criticism of his last album produced by Kanye West, Nasir, he has needed to honour his status as an American rap legend. This time around, he has recruited another producer, a protege of Kanye West: Hit-Boy, known of course for his work with his boss, but also with Jay-Z, A$AP Rocky and Beyonce. On King’s Disease, his thirteenth album, Nas has returned to something fundamentally more down-to-earth, almost as if he has something to excuse himself for. At 46 years old, the Queensbridge native has released 13 tracks that raise questions of what steps need to be taken, life’s low points and past mistakes. It is never too late. Nas has sometimes been reproached for being bogged down with a dated sound, for being musically stubborn. This criticism is no longer valid on his last several albums, including this one. We can hear, for example, the fusion of his deep voice with that of the prince of drill Lil Durk (on Til The War Is Won), or experimentation with trap beats (27 Summers). But Nas is also a product of the 1990s, and continues to remind us of this time, notably by reuniting the members of his old group The Firm (AZ and Foxy Brown) as well as his great childhood friend Cormega on the track Full Circle. Such an event, reuniting the four rappers should bring with it a monumental storm, but it is ultimately the cold atmosphere which comes out on top. King’s Disease is not pretentious: it’s real and true. True in its intention which can be summarised as the denunciation of a capitalist downward spiral and its impact on the individual. It is also true in terms of its balance between eras and the album’s protagonists. It’s the return of a very good Nas to the great delight of rap aesthetes. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 19 juli 2019 | Mass Appeal Records

In 2002, Nas released The Lost Tapes, a compilation of unpublished material recorded between 1998 and 2001 for his albums I Am… (1999) and Stillmatic (2001) which were rejected. The twelve tracks, far from being generic B-sides, were a great remind of the Queensbridge rapper’s caliber when it comes to deadly punchlines and unpredictable flow. Seventeen years later, The Lost Tapes 2 brings out other gems, recorded during the time of albums Hip Hop Is Dead (2006), Untitled (2008), Life Is Good (2012) and Nasir (2018). Def Jam Records planned to publish this second record in 2010 but a conflict opposing the rapper to his record label sent the tapes to the storage room… Summer of 2019, the safe is reopened, and there are some gems, produced by Pharrel, RZA, Kanye West, Swizz Beatz, No I.D or even Pete Rock. A 5 star cast – more senior than junior- which makes this compilation a must have and gives it a very smooth old-school feeling. The eclecticism in the material, whether that be sounds or texts, doesn’t hamper the flow of the album. Nas’ voice is recognizable as always, and that helps to gel everything together. But his fans know that even from the start, with his masterful first album Illmatic (1994), the New Yorker liked to surround himself with a flurry of magicians (MC Serch, Faith N., DJ Premier, L.E.S., Pete Rock, Large Professor, Q-Tip, Rockwilder, Vibesmen, Nick Fury et Marley Marl took part in Illmatic) without ever losing sight of his own personality. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 9 december 2002 | Columbia

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 15 juni 2018 | Mass Appeal - NAS

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After an absence of six years, Nasir Jones returns with a new album produced by Kanye West, as part of the June 2018 G.O.O.D Music salvo. Like recent efforts from Pusha T, Kanye and Kid Cudi before him, Nas’s NASIR project contains seven tracks, like seven deadly sins, each given a laconic treatment by the bard of Queensbridge. Produced and polished in Wyoming, like the rest of the series, this album is full of concision, instinct, and urgency. In the introduction, this is Nas parcelled-out, anti-conformist and skeptical, with Red Army Choirs, the mogul Puff Daddy and the angelic voice of 070 Shake. Over a stunning loop by  Slick Rick, he paints police violence with little impressionist brushstrokes on Cops Shot the Kid with Kanye in tow. Later he works on his excesses, follies and delusions of grandeur on White Label and Bonjour. But it's when he brings in The Dream on Adam and Eve and above all Everything, where Nas hits a more personal note. Somewhere between social commentary, cultural intervention and lucid debate, Nas takes on his own legend, but without necessarily facing up to his faults, as his best enemy Jay-Z did on 4:44. Nasir Jones is trying to have a clear-out, to focus on what's essential, finding both his gift and his curse dulled by the simple things in life. Simple Things is the conclusion of a journey that has been at once public and secret. Throughout its meandering course, Kanye West offers the best possible environment, nestled between classicism and art brut. Nas is very much his own equal here, without compromising his style: people demand a lot of his genius but above all, he remains human.  ©Aurélien Chapuis / Qobuz 
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 5 maart 1999 | Columbia

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 24 september 2002 | Columbia

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 23 januari 2007 | Def Jam Recordings

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 6 augustus 2021 | Mass Appeal

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 29 november 2004 | Sony Urban Music - Columbia

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 2 november 2007 | Columbia

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Verschenen op 19 april 1994 | Legacy Recordings