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Electronic - Verschenen op 17 mei 1999 | Mute, a BMG Company

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Electronic - Verschenen op 1 augustus 2013 | Mute, a BMG Company

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Verschenen op 28 mei 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Moving from punk to symphonic music, even if it takes thirty years, isn’t something just anyone can do. Especially if, along the way, you zig-zag between techno, house, rock, ambient and even punk revival (with the album Animal Rights in 1997).  In 2021, Moby is still twisting and turning to avoid any and all labels that people might try to stick on him. The man who has become the image of the stereotypical "bedroom producer" is once again taking the world by storm with this collaborative album of covers featuring the likes of Gregory Porter, Jim James of My Morning Jacket, Mark Lanegan, Víkingur Ólafsson and the Budapest Art Orchestra. What's more, this album is being released with the most prestigious of classical music labels: Deutsche Grammophon.  It all started in 2018, when Venezuelan conductor Gustavo Dudamel took Moby to see the Los Angeles Philharmonic. This concert took him back to his childhood days, when he was raised on classical music. It reminded him of the ability that orchestras have of expressing nuance, depth, and emotions in much greater detail than a pop song can. And we have to pay tribute to the talent of the Budapest Art Orchestra, which successfully reframes Moby's radio hits. Natural Blues takes on an unsuspected breadth, thanks to the ensemble's backing vocals and Gregory Porter's soulful voice. Jim James' contribution renders Porcelain more poignant than ever.On Go, the Hungarian string section does most of the work, lending the song an even more epic quality. For the soaring, serene rendition of Heroes, a tribute to his personal hero David Bowie, Moby invites his favourite singing partner, Mindy Jones, with whom he has worked on Everything Was Beautiful, and Nothing Hurt and Innocent.  The Lonely Night also deserves special mention. The deep and comforting timbre of Kris Kristofferson’s voice makes this a perfect song for evenings by the fireside. It is just one more stylistic innovation in an album that's stuffed full of them. Despite the star-studded cast and the emotional richness of the material, this track sees Moby enjoying the simple things. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic - Verschenen op 14 juni 2004 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Electronic - Verschenen op 24 december 2020 | mobyambient

Having been wired up to ambient music since his beginnings (his second album, in 1993, was titled Ambient), Moby is returning to the genre as his career turns 30 years old, taking advantage of the quarantine of spring 2020 to embark on a concept album. For this well-named self-titled album, the American musician set himself three rules. First that all the music had to be improvised and unpublished. Secondly, that he forbade editing the parts that he had already recorded and every part of the process, from recording to mixing to listening, had to be “relaxing”. Because Moby's intention is to cure his fans of the stress of 2020 and offer them an opportunity to escape the ambient anxiety (no bad pun intended). He has more or less succeeded with these ten tracks which average about ten minutes each, carried by a very chill piano and soothing synths, and creating the image of a musician finally at peace, removed from his anti-Trump activism of the last four years, a somewhat chaotic approach that had ended up becoming toxic for him and his music. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic - Verschenen op 4 juli 2011 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Electronic - Verschenen op 30 juni 2009 | Because Music

Moby's most unified and understated album, and all the better for it, Wait for Me is a morose set of elegantly bleary material, quite a shift from the hedonistic club tracks of Last Night. Dominated by instrumentals, "Shot in the Back of the Head" is the most evocative of the bunch, seemingly pulled from an unreleased David Lynch film scored by the Afghan Whigs circa Gentlemen -- a lament from a dustbowl, full of mournful slide guitar and dewy electric piano. Other than "Mistake" -- a glum neo-post-punk rave-up that, despite its cathartic release, remains downcast -- Moby leaves the vocals to a series of women (neighborhood chums, apparently) who each contribute to one song. The smoky 3-a.m. gospel whispers from throwback soul singer Leela James on "Walk with Me" steal the show. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 14 maart 1995 | Mute, a BMG Company

For some it was the pinnacle of his career, for others one of a continued string of triumphs (others doubtless cared not at all, thinking somehow that synth and dancebeats equalled musical insincerity, but such is life). Regardless of how one takes it, Everything Is Wrong shows Moby at a definite high point, and if some tracks are much more memorable and involved than others, those successes alone justify the attention and hype he received in his earliest days. Even more noteworthy is that for all that the album is a definite product of time and place, namely 1994-1995, it stands up to further listens for all the further changes in dance since. Having already made his mark with tracks like "Go," "Next Is the E," and "Move," on Everything Is Wrong Moby attempted to balance out the creation of an album in a complete, single-unit sense with his knack for immediately catchy singles. On the latter point he succeeds perfectly, with the frenetic, jungle-inspired anthemic diva showcase "Feeling So Real" (punctuated just so with English-inspired MC breaks) and the giddily sweet pop-minded house of "Everytime You Touch Me" utterly irresistible. Hints of future changes crop up with the speed metal-via-Ministry reworking of Move EP's "All That I Need Is to Be Loved," but the similarly minded blues/thrash of "What Love" forecasts the ham-handed slogs of Animal Rights all too well. Meanwhile, the string-touched "God Moving Over the Face of the Waters" is a self-consciously beautiful, cinematic meditation on spiritual power that in lesser hands might be cheese but comes across here as truly affecting. If there's an ace in the hole, it's the inspired recruiting of former Hugo Largo vocalist Mimi Goese, who had spent the early '90s well out of the public eye. Her turns on "Into the Blue" and especially the haunting, evocative album-closer "When It's Cold I'd Like to Die" bring out in the best in both musicians. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Electronic - Verschenen op 15 maart 2019 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Verschenen op 14 maart 2005 | Mute, a BMG Company

Hotel rarely shows, in any shape or form, traceable inspiration from the new wave and post-punk era Moby advertised as being in full effect. More surprising is that apart from the lovely ambient instrumentals that open and close it, the album is all valley and no peaks, suggesting that the shelving of his sampling device was the worst creative move he could've made. The first half contains simple -- as in basic and/or emaciated, so we're talking poor -- modern rock songs that tend to be anthemic and soul-searching in nature. Lead single "Beautiful" is one exception, a tongue-in-cheek thing Moby has imagined being sung by vacant celebrity couples. No matter how affable, vegan, liberal, bespectacled, or vertically challenged he is, the real irony is that a millionaire and former love interest of Natalie Portman has made a song of this kind (see also: Aerosmith's "Eat the Rich"). Beginning "C'mon bay-beh, c'mon girl, c'mon bay-beh, c'mon girl, I love you bay-beigh, I love you now, I love you bay-beigh, I love you now," the heart of the song doesn't say much more, and some of the guitar jerks are a lot closer to Eddie Money's "Shakin'" than anything related to Joy Division. And, speaking of Joy Division, a very gentle version of New Order's "Temptation" is the album's deepest connection to post-punk; it's telling that Moby opted to leave the vocals to Laura Dawn, since he's less a singer than Bernard Sumner. This begins the non-rock portion of the program, which fans of Play and 18 might find easier to enjoy, but it's not much better than what precedes it. For instance, does anybody need to hear him volley obvious bedroom come-ons with Dawn, as he does on "I Like It"? (Because it's about as appealing as a phrase like "Woody Allen nude scene.") Hotel's saving grace is a bonus disc containing an hour's worth of ambient techno that's good enough for separate release. You could name the two discs after Moby's fellow bald artists, which would tell anyone what they need to know before proceeding. Disc one: "Live's Ed Kowalczyk"; disc two: Brian Eno. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electronic - Verschenen op 31 maart 2008 | Mute, a BMG Company

Op Last Night gaat Moby terug naar zijn wortels in de rave met een zwaar elektronisch album, op maat gemaakt om een vrolijk decadente New Yorkse clubexcursie weer te geven. Alhoewel Moby heeft geklooid met gitaargedreven rock en stemmige instrumentale muziek, is hij duidelijk meer op zijn gemak wanneer hij door house beïnvloedde techno maakt, zoals bleek op zijn uit 1992 afkomstige dancehit “Go.” Bewust de warme, organische neigingen van dat eerdere album vermijdend, geeft Moby zich over aan een cool, robotachtig geluid, zoals te horen is op het glitterachtige “I Love to Move in Here,” met Grandmaster Caz (Cold Crush Brothers) erop, en “Alice”, een energieke door hiphop geïnspireerde track. Last Night is een prima terugkeer van Moby's vorm. Het danspubliek heeft daarmee weer een reden om te feesten. © Eric Schneider /TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 28 mei 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Moving from punk to symphonic music, even if it takes thirty years, isn’t something just anyone can do. Especially if, along the way, you zig-zag between techno, house, rock, ambient and even punk revival (with the album Animal Rights in 1997).  In 2021, Moby is still twisting and turning to avoid any and all labels that people might try to stick on him. The man who has become the image of the stereotypical "bedroom producer" is once again taking the world by storm with this collaborative album of covers featuring the likes of Gregory Porter, Jim James of My Morning Jacket, Mark Lanegan, Víkingur Ólafsson and the Budapest Art Orchestra. What's more, this album is being released with the most prestigious of classical music labels: Deutsche Grammophon.  It all started in 2018, when Venezuelan conductor Gustavo Dudamel took Moby to see the Los Angeles Philharmonic. This concert took him back to his childhood days, when he was raised on classical music. It reminded him of the ability that orchestras have of expressing nuance, depth, and emotions in much greater detail than a pop song can. And we have to pay tribute to the talent of the Budapest Art Orchestra, which successfully reframes Moby's radio hits. Natural Blues takes on an unsuspected breadth, thanks to the ensemble's backing vocals and Gregory Porter's soulful voice. Jim James' contribution renders Porcelain more poignant than ever.On Go, the Hungarian string section does most of the work, lending the song an even more epic quality. For the soaring, serene rendition of Heroes, a tribute to his personal hero David Bowie, Moby invites his favourite singing partner, Mindy Jones, with whom he has worked on Everything Was Beautiful, and Nothing Hurt and Innocent.  The Lonely Night also deserves special mention. The deep and comforting timbre of Kris Kristofferson’s voice makes this a perfect song for evenings by the fireside. It is just one more stylistic innovation in an album that's stuffed full of them. Despite the star-studded cast and the emotional richness of the material, this track sees Moby enjoying the simple things. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic - Verschenen op 27 juli 1992 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Verschenen op 26 februari 2016 | Little Idiot

Pop - Verschenen op 22 juli 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Moby wordt gezien als een van de pioniers van de elektronische muziek. Maar op zijn album Reprise (2021) neemt de Amerikaan vele van zijn bekendste nummers onder handen om ze in een orkestraal of akoestisch jasje te steken. Zo spelen de pianoklanken van de IJslandse pianist Vikingur Ólafsson een hoofrol in de nieuwe versie van het nummer "God Moving Over the Face of the Water". © TiVo
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Electronic - Verschenen op 1 augustus 2013 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Electronic - Verschenen op 17 augustus 1993 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Verschenen op 14 maart 2005 | Little Idiot

Hotel rarely shows, in any shape or form, traceable inspiration from the new wave and post-punk era Moby advertised as being in full effect. More surprising is that apart from the lovely ambient instrumentals that open and close it, the album is all valley and no peaks, suggesting that the shelving of his sampling device was the worst creative move he could've made. The first half contains simple -- as in basic and/or emaciated, so we're talking poor -- modern rock songs that tend to be anthemic and soul-searching in nature. Lead single "Beautiful" is one exception, a tongue-in-cheek thing Moby has imagined being sung by vacant celebrity couples. No matter how affable, vegan, liberal, bespectacled, or vertically challenged he is, the real irony is that a millionaire and former love interest of Natalie Portman has made a song of this kind (see also: Aerosmith's "Eat the Rich"). Beginning "C'mon bay-beh, c'mon girl, c'mon bay-beh, c'mon girl, I love you bay-beigh, I love you now, I love you bay-beigh, I love you now," the heart of the song doesn't say much more, and some of the guitar jerks are a lot closer to Eddie Money's "Shakin'" than anything related to Joy Division. And, speaking of Joy Division, a very gentle version of New Order's "Temptation" is the album's deepest connection to post-punk; it's telling that Moby opted to leave the vocals to Laura Dawn, since he's less a singer than Bernard Sumner. This begins the non-rock portion of the program, which fans of Play and 18 might find easier to enjoy, but it's not much better than what precedes it. For instance, does anybody need to hear him volley obvious bedroom come-ons with Dawn, as he does on "I Like It"? (Because it's about as appealing as a phrase like "Woody Allen nude scene.") Hotel's saving grace is a bonus disc containing an hour's worth of ambient techno that's good enough for separate release. You could name the two discs after Moby's fellow bald artists, which would tell anyone what they need to know before proceeding. Disc one: "Live's Ed Kowalczyk"; disc two: Brian Eno. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 2005 | Mute, a BMG Company

Ever since "The Girl and the Robot," it's been clear that Röyksopp and Robyn bring out the best in each other in a way that stands apart from each act's other collaborations: Torbjørn Brundtland and Svein Berge help ground her flights of fancy, while she enlivens their sophistication. Released shortly before their mid-2014 joint tour, Do It Again makes the most of their partnership. The trio bookends the EP with two of the most introspective tracks to ever grace a Robyn-affiliated project. "Monument" begins things with the singer in a strikingly reflective mood, sighing "When the moment comes, I can say I did it all with love" as Brundtland and Berge craft an expansive, elegant atmosphere that continues on "Inside the Idle Hour Club," a somber expanse of looping synths and brass just barely pinned down by a hypnotic house beat. This low-key side is even more pronounced compared to Robyn's vibrant Body Talk era (Röyksopp's subdued album Senior is probably a more valid touchstone), but the EP's sugary pop center provides a welcome balance. The standout "Sayit," which features Robyn duetting with an amorous Speak & Spell over an increasingly frenetic, and kinetic, beat, takes Do It Again's sleek aesthetic in a more danceable direction and winks at "The Girl and the Robot"'s titular concept. The title track is another highlight, serving up the kind of complex feelings and sparkling dance-pop that are Robyn's trademarks as she contemplates resuming an on-again, off-again relationship. Fortunately, Do It Again is a much happier reunion of collaborators with perfectly matched strengths. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Electronic - Verschenen op 3 september 2007 | Mute, a BMG Company

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