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Soul - Verschenen op 28 augustus 1973 | Motown

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Soul - Verschenen op 1 januari 2001 | Motown

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Qobuz Referentie
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Soul - Verschenen op 8 december 1972 | Motown

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Qobuz Referentie
In 1972, things were rapidly shifting in Marvin Gaye's world. He was coming off of one of his most wide-reaching hit albums with 1971's instant classic What's Going On, and his recording contract with Motown subsidiary Tamla was renewed for a cool million dollars and total creative control, making him one of the most successful R&B artists of his day. With Motown's offices migrating west from Detroit to Los Angeles, Gaye followed suit, beginning work on Trouble Man, both the score to a blaxploitation film of the same name and the soundtrack that would be his next album. With minimal singing (Gaye sings through only the title track, adding fragmentary vocalizations minimally throughout the rest of the album), Gaye wrote, arranged, and conducted the entire soundtrack, working with both Motown players and a full orchestra over the course of its recording. It's been speculated by some that Trouble Man was a concerted effort to move away from the expectations of a carbon-copy follow-up to the almost immeasurably high standards of What's Going On, but it's best to look at the record as an entity unto itself rather than the next Marvin Gaye album in the chain. Though largely absent of his one-of-a-kind vocal presence, the arrangements are richer and more sophisticated than the majority of early blaxploitation fare, with some of the same theatricality and filmic urgency of the best Morricone or David Axelrod soundtracks. With instrumentation more ambitious than even the enormity of What's Going On, Trouble Man never stays in one place for long. "'T' Plays It Cool" paints a hustling cityscape with its solid beat and nervous synthesizer bubbles. Plaintive sax trades verses with rudimentary keyboards and Marvin's soulful wails on "Life Is a Gamble," and mournful passages of chamber strings give way to bounding funk grooves. Isaac Hayes' Shaft soundtrack would become debatably more widely remembered than the movie it scored, and Curtis Mayfield's Superfly soundtrack had a similar reception. Likewise, Trouble Man the soundtrack album outperformed Trouble Man the movie by leaps and bounds, enjoying Top 20 chart success in its day while the movie sank rapidly into obscurity. Looking at the album outside the trends of its era and inward to the art that Gaye was sculpting shows Trouble Man as a mostly wordless statement on the rapidly changing times for both young black America and Marvin's personal life. The compositions well over with equal parts tension and detached cool, moving through modes of heartbreaking struggle, searching wonder, and playful street scenes. While it's been relegated to the lesser status of Gaye's one-off blaxploitation soundtrack, it rises far above the wandering wah-wah guitars and dated bongos of its peers. Trouble Man might not be as immediate or universally relatable as Gaye's soul-searching on What's Going On or his later sensual fixations, but a deep listen will show it's very much part of the same overarching genius that touched all of his work. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Soul - Verschenen op 21 mei 1971 | Motown

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Devastated by the death of his partner Tammi Terrell, who died of cancer on 6 March 1970 at the age of just 24, Marvin Gaye withdrew from show business and fell into a deep depression. He threw himself into football and signed with the Detroit Lions. In June of the same year, however, the social and political situation compelled him to return to recording. As America struggled with its own demons, both internal (segregation) and external (Vietnam), he released a masterpiece of conscious soul. With its politically-engaged prose, What's Going On, which was released on 21 May 1971,  shook the Motown label out of its rosy American dream and forced it to confront the realities of the time. But Marvin Gaye, a poet and above all an entertainer, saw to it that his social and political sermon was delivered with a truly unique groove. The album is a masterful symphony, both measured and calculated, in which the string section enchants the rhythm and chorus. But it wasn't easy to lay this cornerstone of Black American music: Berry Gordy, the head of Motown, was worried that this politically-charged project would damage the very positive (perhaps too positive) public image of both his label and his protégé. With What's Going On, Marvin Gaye forced Gordy to face up to the war in Vietnam, interracial tensions and the degradation of great American cities. The success of the record was immediate and hugely impressive, with What's Going On raking in heaps of awards. Perhaps more notable was the fact that this was the first time a Motown record had been produced and designed in this way, without complete control from Gordy. Marvin Gaye went on to sign a new contract with the label, this time for a million dollars, making it the biggest contract ever signed by a black artist at the time. As for What's Going On, it remains one of the greatest albums of the twentieth century. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Soul - Verschenen op 1 oktober 1982 | Columbia - Legacy

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Soul - Verschenen op 15 december 1978 | Motown

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
For nearly half a century, Marvin Gaye has had the final word on the dissolution of his marriage to Anna Gordy in the form of his album Here, My Dear. Famously recorded as part of their divorce settlement—Gaye, being pretty bad with money, had to offer up half the advance and all the royalties from an upcoming album in lieu of a cash alimony payment—Here, My Dear captures the sadness, confusion, and anger swirling around the end of a 14-year marriage. It only captures Marvin Gaye's perspective on those emotions, and while yes, there are always two sides to every story, the case that Marvin presents here is, frankly, kind of bogus. Spread out over two vinyl albums, the songs of Here, My Dear draped their protagonist in a blanket of self-pity, justification, and recrimination with little evidence of any acceptance of his responsibility for the end of the marriage. Gaye's self-centered approach to the lyrics is deeply problematic and sadly misogynist, casting Anna Gordy Gaye as a kind of gold-digging opportunist who somehow managed to fall out of love with the man who explicitly sought out a relationship with her due to her proximity to Motown's power centers, blew most of their money on drugs and whatever else struck his fancy, and was repeatedly unfaithful throughout their marriage, including a relationship with an underage Janis Hunter (whom he would marry immediately upon divorcing Anna Gordy) while recording Let’s Get it On. Needless to say, casting Here, My Dear as Gaye's woe-is-me divorce album is selling the reality of the situation short. However, the relative musical freedom he clearly felt in crafting the album—after all, he surely was ambivalent at best about its sales potential—absolutely resulted in what was the artist's last masterwork. Possessed of an atmosphere that amplifies the more ethereal tendencies of Let’s Get it On’sspacious grooves, Here, My Dear is nearly gossamer in its production, with instruments and vocals floating in and out of the mix, all barely anchored by a recurring theme ("When Did You Stop Loving Me") that not only shows up in three similarly titled tracks, but also in melody lines and musical refrains that emerge and retreat throughout. Locked into a mid tempo groove from the very first track, the album seamlessly blends together, especially in the first half. The second half proves fertile ground for Gaye's experimental nature. While maintaining the vibe (and self-pity) of the opening half "Sparrow" begins gently and mournful and turns acidly bitter with gritty, wailing saxophone and hissed lyrics, and then goes even darker and weirder than its already dark and weird predecessors. Even in a career full of weirdo lyrics and deceptively left-field grooves, "Funky Space Reincarnation" stands out for its combination of lasciviousness ("Hey, baby, let's mess around; Let's feel each other's ass") and looniness ("Hey little baby, let's magnetize magnets!"). By the time the album winds down with the theoretically optimistic "Falling In Love Again" (about Gaye's relationship with Janis) and a brief, haunting reprise of "When Did You Stop Loving Me" (worth noting: Marvin and Janis Gaye separated less than a year after the release of Here, My Dear ), it's clear that this album is less a document of a divorce than it is a cathartic exposition of one man's incredibly unhealthy approach to relationships. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Soul - Verschenen op 12 mei 1989 | Columbia

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Soul - Verschenen op 1 januari 1997 | Motown

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Soul - Verschenen op 1 januari 1981 | Motown

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Soul - Verschenen op 1 januari 2005 | Hip-O Select

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Soul - Verschenen op 8 december 1972 | UNI - MOTOWN

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
In 1972, things were rapidly shifting in Marvin Gaye's world. He was coming off of one of his most wide-reaching hit albums with 1971's instant classic What's Going On, and his recording contract with Motown subsidiary Tamla was renewed for a cool million dollars and total creative control, making him one of the most successful R&B artists of his day. With Motown's offices migrating west from Detroit to Los Angeles, Gaye followed suit, beginning work on Trouble Man, both the score to a blaxploitation film of the same name and the soundtrack that would be his next album. With minimal singing (Gaye sings through only the title track, adding fragmentary vocalizations minimally throughout the rest of the album), Gaye wrote, arranged, and conducted the entire soundtrack, working with both Motown players and a full orchestra over the course of its recording. It's been speculated by some that Trouble Man was a concerted effort to move away from the expectations of a carbon-copy follow-up to the almost immeasurably high standards of What's Going On, but it's best to look at the record as an entity unto itself rather than the next Marvin Gaye album in the chain. Though largely absent of his one-of-a-kind vocal presence, the arrangements are richer and more sophisticated than the majority of early blaxploitation fare, with some of the same theatricality and filmic urgency of the best Morricone or David Axelrod soundtracks. With instrumentation more ambitious than even the enormity of What's Going On, Trouble Man never stays in one place for long. "'T' Plays It Cool" paints a hustling cityscape with its solid beat and nervous synthesizer bubbles. Plaintive sax trades verses with rudimentary keyboards and Marvin's soulful wails on "Life Is a Gamble," and mournful passages of chamber strings give way to bounding funk grooves. Isaac Hayes' Shaft soundtrack would become debatably more widely remembered than the movie it scored, and Curtis Mayfield's Superfly soundtrack had a similar reception. Likewise, Trouble Man the soundtrack album outperformed Trouble Man the movie by leaps and bounds, enjoying Top 20 chart success in its day while the movie sank rapidly into obscurity. Looking at the album outside the trends of its era and inward to the art that Gaye was sculpting shows Trouble Man as a mostly wordless statement on the rapidly changing times for both young black America and Marvin's personal life. The compositions well over with equal parts tension and detached cool, moving through modes of heartbreaking struggle, searching wonder, and playful street scenes. While it's been relegated to the lesser status of Gaye's one-off blaxploitation soundtrack, it rises far above the wandering wah-wah guitars and dated bongos of its peers. Trouble Man might not be as immediate or universally relatable as Gaye's soul-searching on What's Going On or his later sensual fixations, but a deep listen will show it's very much part of the same overarching genius that touched all of his work. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Soul - Verschenen op 1 januari 2002 | UNI - MOTOWN

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Soul - Verschenen op 1 januari 2009 | Universal Music Enterprises

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Soul - Verschenen op 1 januari 2014 | Motown

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Soul - Verschenen op 16 maart 1976 | Motown

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I Want You, while it a Top Ten smash for Marvin Gaye in 1976, is not as generally as well-known as its predecessors for several reasons. First, it marked a sharp change in direction, leaving his trademark Motown soul for lush, funky, breezy disco. Secondly, its subject matter is as close to explicit as pop records got in 1976. Third, Gaye hadn't recorded in nearly three years and critics were onto something else -- exactly what, in retrospect is anybody's guess. From the amazing Ernie Barnes cover painting "Back to Sugar Shack" to the Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson string and horn arrangements to Leon Ware's exotic production that relied on keyboards as well as drums and basses as rhythm instruments, I Want You was a giant leap for Gaye. The feel of the album was one of late-night parties in basements and small clubs, and the intimacy of the music evokes the image of people getting closer as every hour of a steamy night wears on. But the most astonishing things about I Want You are its intimacy (it was dedicated to and recorded in front of Gaye's future second wife, Jan), silky elegance, and seamless textures. Gaye worked with producer Leon Ware, who wrote all of the original songs on the album and worked with Gaye to revise them, thus lending Gaye a co-writing credit. The title track is a monster two-step groover with hand percussion playing counterpoint to the strings and horns layered in against a spare electric guitar solo, all before Gaye begins to sing on top of the funky backbeat. It's a party anthem to be sure, and one that evokes the vulnerability that a man in love displays when the object of his affection is in plain sight. Art Stewart's engineering rounds off all the edges and makes Gaye's already sweet crooning instrument into the true grain in the voice of seductive need. "Feel All My Love Inside" and "I Want to Be Where You Are" are anthems to sensuality with strings creeping up under Gaye's voice as the guitars move through a series of chunky changes and drums punctuate his every syllable. In all, the original album is a suite to the bedroom, one in which a man tells his woman all of his sexual aspirations because of his love for her. The entire album has been referenced by everyone from Mary J. Blige to D'Angelo to Chico DeBarge and even Todd Rundgren, who performed the title track live regularly. By the time it is over, the listener should be a blissed-out, brimming container for amorous hunger. I Want You and its companion, Ware's Musical Massage, are the pre-eminent early disco concept albums. They are adult albums about intimacy, sensuality, and commitment, and decades later they still reverberate with class, sincerity, grace, intense focus, and astonishingly good taste. I Want You is as necessary as anything Gaye ever recorded. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Soul - Verschenen op 8 december 1972 | Motown

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In 1972, things were rapidly shifting in Marvin Gaye's world. He was coming off of one of his most wide-reaching hit albums with 1971's instant classic What's Going On, and his recording contract with Motown subsidiary Tamla was renewed for a cool million dollars and total creative control, making him one of the most successful R&B artists of his day. With Motown's offices migrating west from Detroit to Los Angeles, Gaye followed suit, beginning work on Trouble Man, both the score to a blaxploitation film of the same name and the soundtrack that would be his next album. With minimal singing (Gaye sings through only the title track, adding fragmentary vocalizations minimally throughout the rest of the album), Gaye wrote, arranged, and conducted the entire soundtrack, working with both Motown players and a full orchestra over the course of its recording. It's been speculated by some that Trouble Man was a concerted effort to move away from the expectations of a carbon-copy follow-up to the almost immeasurably high standards of What's Going On, but it's best to look at the record as an entity unto itself rather than the next Marvin Gaye album in the chain. Though largely absent of his one-of-a-kind vocal presence, the arrangements are richer and more sophisticated than the majority of early blaxploitation fare, with some of the same theatricality and filmic urgency of the best Morricone or David Axelrod soundtracks. With instrumentation more ambitious than even the enormity of What's Going On, Trouble Man never stays in one place for long. "'T' Plays It Cool" paints a hustling cityscape with its solid beat and nervous synthesizer bubbles. Plaintive sax trades verses with rudimentary keyboards and Marvin's soulful wails on "Life Is a Gamble," and mournful passages of chamber strings give way to bounding funk grooves. Isaac Hayes' Shaft soundtrack would become debatably more widely remembered than the movie it scored, and Curtis Mayfield's Superfly soundtrack had a similar reception. Likewise, Trouble Man the soundtrack album outperformed Trouble Man the movie by leaps and bounds, enjoying Top 20 chart success in its day while the movie sank rapidly into obscurity. Looking at the album outside the trends of its era and inward to the art that Gaye was sculpting shows Trouble Man as a mostly wordless statement on the rapidly changing times for both young black America and Marvin's personal life. The compositions well over with equal parts tension and detached cool, moving through modes of heartbreaking struggle, searching wonder, and playful street scenes. While it's been relegated to the lesser status of Gaye's one-off blaxploitation soundtrack, it rises far above the wandering wah-wah guitars and dated bongos of its peers. Trouble Man might not be as immediate or universally relatable as Gaye's soul-searching on What's Going On or his later sensual fixations, but a deep listen will show it's very much part of the same overarching genius that touched all of his work. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Soul - Verschenen op 29 maart 2019 | Motown

Putting the words “previously unreleased” next to the name Marvin Gaye has always had quite the effect. When the Deluxe Editions of What’s Going On, Let’s Get It On, Hear, My Dear and other albums were released, fans of the master of soul who died in 1984 got their money’s worth of alternative takes and previously unreleased recordings. This time, You’re the Man released in 2019 is a kind of Holy Grail of his music that has finally been unearthed. When he published What’s Going On in May 1971, Marvin Gaye completely transformed soul music and Motown as well as the history of popular music in general. This very mindful and deliberate masterpiece forced Berry Gordy, the label’s boss, to face the war in Vietnam, interracial tensions and the poverty in American cities. This was the first time that a Motown album was produced without Gordy’s total control and dealt with social issues rather than pleasant love songs. It was also the first time that Marvin Gaye, the entertainer, now had a social and political voice. In the wake of What’s Going On, the star began working on a new album called You’re the Man and released a single with the same title as an attack against the incumbent president, Richard Nixon. However, this attack was not to Gordy’s taste and after agreeing to release the single he refused to proceed with the album and even persuaded the singer to change his mind too. Some of the songs planned for You’re the Man were added here and there on some of his future recordings, but the 2019 version finally presents the album that Marvin Gaye dreamed of releasing in its entirety. This album’s resurrection is all the more enjoyable in the midst of Donald Trump’s presidency and lyrics like We don’t want to hear more lies / About how you plan to economise emphasise the timelessness of his music. The same struggles faced by black people under President Nixon are now faced by those under Trump. He even touches on feminism in the song We Can Make It Baby. For the production of You’re the Man, Marvin Gaye alternated between what he did on What’s Going On as well as the soundtrack of the film Trouble Man released in 1973. His voice fits perfectly with an instrumentation that is somewhere between groovy soul and light funk. To bring all of this together, it is also worth pointing out that Motown relied on producer Salaam Remi, known for his association with Nas, Amy Winehouse, the Fugees and Miguel. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Soul - Verschenen op 22 januari 2021 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Soul - Verschenen op 1 augustus 1968 | Motown

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Soul - Verschenen op 8 december 1972 | UNI - MOTOWN

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In 1972, things were rapidly shifting in Marvin Gaye's world. He was coming off of one of his most wide-reaching hit albums with 1971's instant classic What's Going On, and his recording contract with Motown subsidiary Tamla was renewed for a cool million dollars and total creative control, making him one of the most successful R&B artists of his day. With Motown's offices migrating west from Detroit to Los Angeles, Gaye followed suit, beginning work on Trouble Man, both the score to a blaxploitation film of the same name and the soundtrack that would be his next album. With minimal singing (Gaye sings through only the title track, adding fragmentary vocalizations minimally throughout the rest of the album), Gaye wrote, arranged, and conducted the entire soundtrack, working with both Motown players and a full orchestra over the course of its recording. It's been speculated by some that Trouble Man was a concerted effort to move away from the expectations of a carbon-copy follow-up to the almost immeasurably high standards of What's Going On, but it's best to look at the record as an entity unto itself rather than the next Marvin Gaye album in the chain. Though largely absent of his one-of-a-kind vocal presence, the arrangements are richer and more sophisticated than the majority of early blaxploitation fare, with some of the same theatricality and filmic urgency of the best Morricone or David Axelrod soundtracks. With instrumentation more ambitious than even the enormity of What's Going On, Trouble Man never stays in one place for long. "'T' Plays It Cool" paints a hustling cityscape with its solid beat and nervous synthesizer bubbles. Plaintive sax trades verses with rudimentary keyboards and Marvin's soulful wails on "Life Is a Gamble," and mournful passages of chamber strings give way to bounding funk grooves. Isaac Hayes' Shaft soundtrack would become debatably more widely remembered than the movie it scored, and Curtis Mayfield's Superfly soundtrack had a similar reception. Likewise, Trouble Man the soundtrack album outperformed Trouble Man the movie by leaps and bounds, enjoying Top 20 chart success in its day while the movie sank rapidly into obscurity. Looking at the album outside the trends of its era and inward to the art that Gaye was sculpting shows Trouble Man as a mostly wordless statement on the rapidly changing times for both young black America and Marvin's personal life. The compositions well over with equal parts tension and detached cool, moving through modes of heartbreaking struggle, searching wonder, and playful street scenes. While it's been relegated to the lesser status of Gaye's one-off blaxploitation soundtrack, it rises far above the wandering wah-wah guitars and dated bongos of its peers. Trouble Man might not be as immediate or universally relatable as Gaye's soul-searching on What's Going On or his later sensual fixations, but a deep listen will show it's very much part of the same overarching genius that touched all of his work. © Fred Thomas /TiVo

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Marvin Gaye in het magazine