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Jazz - Verschenen op 16 september 2016 | Impulse!

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - L'album du mois JAZZ NEWS
Recorded at the Parish Church of Saint Mary the Virgin in Great Milton, Oxfordshire, England, Madeleine Peyroux's eighth studio album, 2016's Secular Hymns, finds the vocalist/guitarist delivering a stripped-down, largely acoustic set of warm, eclectic cover tunes. Backing Peyroux this time out are guitarist/vocalist Jon Herington and bassist/vocalist Barak Mori, both highly sought-after New York-based musicians with deep jazz, blues, and rock credits. While technically a studio album, Secular Hymns was recorded as if a live concert, a choice inspired by Peyroux's 2015 performance at the venue. The result is an album that's a 180-degree turn from her previous effort, 2013's ambitious homage to Ray Charles, The Blue Room. Where that album framed Peyroux's earthy vocals in organ, electric guitar, horns, and a lush orchestra, Secular Hymns feels like you are sitting in the front row of an intimate Peyroux concert. Here, Peyroux eases into the session, kicking things off with a supple, harmonized, Western swing-tinged take on John Greer & the Rhythm Rockers' 1951 side "Got You on My Mind." She then struts through Tom Waits' "Tango Till They're Sore," imbuing the song with a wry sensuality that's equal parts Billie Holiday and Marlene Dietrich. Despite the acoustic, minimalist nature of the production, Peyroux still manages to defy expectations, offering up a delicately swaggering take on Allen Toussaint's "Everything I Do Gonh Be Funky (From Now On)" and transforming Linton Kwesi Johnson's reggae anthem "More Time" into a something that sounds improbably like Eartha Kitt doing a cabaret homage to Bob Marley. Thankfully, it works, as do other selections including her more traditional readings of songs like the swinging Sister Rosetta Tharpe number "Shout Sister Shout" and her folky, sad-eyed version of Townes Van Zandt's "The Highway Kind." Particular effective is her bittersweet take on Stephen Foster's parlor song "Hard Times Come Again No More." A poignant rumination on life's inequities and hardships, particularly those visited on the less fortunate in society, the song is a perfect fit for Peyroux's throaty, highly resonant voice, an instrument that has only ripened in the decades since her debut. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 25 maart 2013 | Universal Music Group International

Booklet Onderscheidingen Sélection JAZZ NEWS
The Blue Room is Madeleine Peyroux haar zevende studioalbum. De insteek van het album was om een soort jazz-pop remake te maken van Ray Charles' revolutionaire album Modern Sounds in Country and Western, waarop zo’n beetje alle Amerikaanse muziekstijlen vermengd werden. The Blue Room werd geproduceerd door sterproducer Larry Klein en staat bol van strijkers gearrangeerd door Metropole Orkest dirigent Vince Mendoza. Op het album staan dus uitsluitend songs van anderen, maar het is veel meer dan een willekeurige serie covers. Naast 5 covers van Modern Sounds… staan er onder andere ook covers op van Buddy Holly (“Changing All The Changes”), Randy Newman (“Guilty”) en meer. In totaal 10 nummers. © TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 januari 2011 | Universal Music Group International

Onderscheidingen Sélection Les Inrocks
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Vocale jazz - Verschenen op 27 augustus 2021 | Craft Recordings

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Jazz - Verschenen op 14 september 2004 | Universal Music Group International

Why it took vocalist Madeleine Peyroux eight years to follow up her acclaimed Dreamland album is anybody's guess. The explanation from her website bio claims, "I could have kept running with it, but I took a breather." Really it hardly matters, since there have been plenty of capable singers to fill that void. Produced by Larry Klein, Careless Love is essentially Dreamland part deux. She lost Yves Beauvais and Atlantic Records, as well as a stellar cast of edgy jazz and rock session players, but she did gain Larry Klein. There are some fine players on this album, including Larry Goldings, Scott Amendola, David Piltch, and Dean Parks, and it's a much more focused set than Dreamland. That she's on Rounder is just an "oh well." Since Klein is not reined in by having to be a "jazz" producer, his sense of restrained and subtle adventure is a perfect foil for Peyroux's voice and phrasing, which is still too close to the Billie Holiday model for comfort. The material is a curious collection of modern pop songs, country tunes, and old nuggets. There's an original as well in "Don't Wait Too Long," co-written with Jesse Harris and Klein. Peyroux's reading of Leonard Cohen's "Dance Me to the End of Love" that opens the disc is radical, sung like a German cabaret song, and lacks the drama of the original, which is on purpose but it's questionable as to whether it works. Her cover of Bob Dylan's "You're Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go" works much better. It keeps the breeziness of the original but focuses on the object of the song still being very present to the protagonist -- delighting in the presence of the Beloved. Parks' guitars play sparely and pronouncedly in the mix, as Amendola's brushwork complements the spare cymbal and tom-tom work of Jay Bellerose as well as Goldings' in-the-groove organ and piano. The hinge track on this record is the empathic and moving version of Elliott Smith's "Between the Bars." With tense sound effects whispering in the backdrop and Goldings' celeste setting the atmosphere, once again Amendola's brushes whisper and shimmer, giving the singer an anchor in the depth of the song's melancholy. It's simply awesome. The sparse haunted treatment of Hank Williams' "Weary Blues" is devoid of its country trappings and rooted firmly in the uptown blues tradition of Holiday's 1940s. Likewise, the title track, a classic standard by W.C. Handy, is turned inside out and made a gospel-flavored R&B tune, driven by Goldings on the organ and a Rhodes piano -- an instrument that makes a frequent appearance here. Parks' subtle yet dirty guitar gives the singer a platform and she swims inside the lyric, letting it fall from her mouth. The tune's swing quotient is formidable. In all, this is a stronger record than Dreamland, in part because Klein is obviously sympathetic to singers and because Peyroux is a more confident and commanding singer. It's a welcome addition to the shelf, but if she waits another eight years, that space reserved for her may disappear. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 12 september 2006 | Universal Music Group International

Madeleine Peyroux took significantly less time than the eight years between her debut and its follow-up to release her third album, Half the Perfect World, which finds a more mature -- or at least less vulnerable -- singer, one who chooses to express herself with nuance rather than overtness. Often, like in the opening "I'm All Right" -- one of four original songs -- this aversion to unconcealed emotion works well, playing off the swelling Hammond, the swinging rhythm of the acoustic guitar (contrasting nicely with the hook of "It's all right, I've been lonely before"), and the simple drums. But at other times, like in "A Little Bit" -- which is bluesy and more upbeat and practically screams for an outburst, a growl, something -- her hesitancy instead almost comes across as a flaw, as a fear of fully expressing herself. On "Blue Alert," where Anjani's voice was full and seductive, rife with curling smoke rings and lipstick-stained wineglasses, Peyroux seems desolate and flat and she simplifies the situation too much, though she does fare much better on the other Anjani/Leonard Cohen piece and title track of the album. Here, she changes its perspective, mixing the characters together and sounding beautifully fragile, yet at the same time strong and certain, as she sings about her love. The same can be said for her version of the Johnny Mercer-penned "The Summer Wind," which uses a cleaner, less dramatic arrangement to convey the feeling that, though she's thinking about past events with some nostalgia, she's also able to accept the outcome and move forward with her life. This kind of resignation hangs heavy throughout the entire album, making every song she covers seem sadder than the original. Joni Mitchell's "River," sung with k.d. lang, is slow and heart-wrenching (lang's voice, especially, brings a sweet melancholy to it), and Peyroux's version of Charlie Chaplin's "Smile" has a kind of dejected resoluteness that makes you wonder if she can even follow the advice she's singing. This subtlety is two-fold, however. It's so prevalent in the music that it's hard to tell if it's hinting at greater depth or if it's really a protective blanket, an affected timidity to prevent exposure. The delicateness of Half the Perfect World is certainly nice, but Peyroux seems to be using it as a device to hide behind instead of an actual expression of feeling, and so while the album is an overall success, it still leaves questions lingering behind the softly clicking hi-hat, the wandering bass, of when the singer's really going to show herself completely. © Marisa Brown /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 14 september 2004 | New Rounder

Why it took vocalist Madeleine Peyroux eight years to follow up her acclaimed Dreamland album is anybody's guess. The explanation from her website bio claims, "I could have kept running with it, but I took a breather." Really it hardly matters, since there have been plenty of capable singers to fill that void. Produced by Larry Klein, Careless Love is essentially Dreamland part deux. She lost Yves Beauvais and Atlantic Records, as well as a stellar cast of edgy jazz and rock session players, but she did gain Larry Klein. There are some fine players on this album, including Larry Goldings, Scott Amendola, David Piltch, and Dean Parks, and it's a much more focused set than Dreamland. That she's on Rounder is just an "oh well." Since Klein is not reined in by having to be a "jazz" producer, his sense of restrained and subtle adventure is a perfect foil for Peyroux's voice and phrasing, which is still too close to the Billie Holiday model for comfort. The material is a curious collection of modern pop songs, country tunes, and old nuggets. There's an original as well in "Don't Wait Too Long," co-written with Jesse Harris and Klein. Peyroux's reading of Leonard Cohen's "Dance Me to the End of Love" that opens the disc is radical, sung like a German cabaret song, and lacks the drama of the original, which is on purpose but it's questionable as to whether it works. Her cover of Bob Dylan's "You're Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go" works much better. It keeps the breeziness of the original but focuses on the object of the song still being very present to the protagonist -- delighting in the presence of the Beloved. Parks' guitars play sparely and pronouncedly in the mix, as Amendola's brushwork complements the spare cymbal and tom-tom work of Jay Bellerose as well as Goldings' in-the-groove organ and piano. The hinge track on this record is the empathic and moving version of Elliott Smith's "Between the Bars." With tense sound effects whispering in the backdrop and Goldings' celeste setting the atmosphere, once again Amendola's brushes whisper and shimmer, giving the singer an anchor in the depth of the song's melancholy. It's simply awesome. The sparse haunted treatment of Hank Williams' "Weary Blues" is devoid of its country trappings and rooted firmly in the uptown blues tradition of Holiday's 1940s. Likewise, the title track, a classic standard by W.C. Handy, is turned inside out and made a gospel-flavored R&B tune, driven by Goldings on the organ and a Rhodes piano -- an instrument that makes a frequent appearance here. Parks' subtle yet dirty guitar gives the singer a platform and she swims inside the lyric, letting it fall from her mouth. The tune's swing quotient is formidable. In all, this is a stronger record than Dreamland, in part because Klein is obviously sympathetic to singers and because Peyroux is a more confident and commanding singer. It's a welcome addition to the shelf, but if she waits another eight years, that space reserved for her may disappear. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Vocale jazz - Verschenen op 31 augustus 2018 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Hi-Res Booklet
That Leonard Cohen is still offering inspiration should come as no great surprise. Dubbing her album Anthem after a song by the Canadian singer, Madeleine Peyroux shows us her hand from the off. Perhaps it's her desire to get shot of the ghost of Billie Holiday to whom she has often been compared… But in 2018, Madeline Peyroux is very much Madeleine Peyroux! Style, voice, writing, she has mastered every part of her art and has nothing left to prove. This time, she leaves covers behind and offers new songs, written or co-written with Patrick Warren (Bonnie Raitt, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen), Brian MacLeod (Leonard Cohen, Tina Turner), David Baerwald (Joni Mitchell, Sheryl Crow) and producer Larry Klein (Joni Mitchell, Shawn Colvin, Herbie Hancock). The lyrics are often politically-engaged, and she sets them lovingly to soft-to-downright-melancholy music. The overall effect is one of weightlessness. The arrangements and the production have a velvety feel, and while she takes on Paul Eluard's powerful poem Liberté, she does it with a delicate touch that renders the words even stronger. As is often the case with Peyroux, the boundaries between jazz, pop, soul, blues and folk are savvily blurred together. This makes for a great showcase for her voice, one of the most addictive of her generation. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 januari 2014 | New Rounder

Booklet
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Internationaal variété - Verschenen op 27 september 1996 | Atlantic Records

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Pop - Verschenen op 10 maart 2009 | New Rounder

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Jazz - Verschenen op 12 september 2006 | Rounder

Madeleine Peyroux took significantly less time than the eight years between her debut and its follow-up to release her third album, Half the Perfect World, which finds a more mature -- or at least less vulnerable -- singer, one who chooses to express herself with nuance rather than overtness. Often, like in the opening "I'm All Right" -- one of four original songs -- this aversion to unconcealed emotion works well, playing off the swelling Hammond, the swinging rhythm of the acoustic guitar (contrasting nicely with the hook of "It's all right, I've been lonely before"), and the simple drums. But at other times, like in "A Little Bit" -- which is bluesy and more upbeat and practically screams for an outburst, a growl, something -- her hesitancy instead almost comes across as a flaw, as a fear of fully expressing herself. On "Blue Alert," where Anjani's voice was full and seductive, rife with curling smoke rings and lipstick-stained wineglasses, Peyroux seems desolate and flat and she simplifies the situation too much, though she does fare much better on the other Anjani/Leonard Cohen piece and title track of the album. Here, she changes its perspective, mixing the characters together and sounding beautifully fragile, yet at the same time strong and certain, as she sings about her love. The same can be said for her version of the Johnny Mercer-penned "The Summer Wind," which uses a cleaner, less dramatic arrangement to convey the feeling that, though she's thinking about past events with some nostalgia, she's also able to accept the outcome and move forward with her life. This kind of resignation hangs heavy throughout the entire album, making every song she covers seem sadder than the original. Joni Mitchell's "River," sung with k.d. lang, is slow and heart-wrenching (lang's voice, especially, brings a sweet melancholy to it), and Peyroux's version of Charlie Chaplin's "Smile" has a kind of dejected resoluteness that makes you wonder if she can even follow the advice she's singing. This subtlety is two-fold, however. It's so prevalent in the music that it's hard to tell if it's hinting at greater depth or if it's really a protective blanket, an affected timidity to prevent exposure. The delicateness of Half the Perfect World is certainly nice, but Peyroux seems to be using it as a device to hide behind instead of an actual expression of feeling, and so while the album is an overall success, it still leaves questions lingering behind the softly clicking hi-hat, the wandering bass, of when the singer's really going to show herself completely. © Marisa Brown /TiVo
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Vocale jazz - Verschenen op 31 augustus 2018 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Booklet
That Leonard Cohen is still offering inspiration should come as no great surprise. Dubbing her album Anthem after a song by the Canadian singer, Madeleine Peyroux shows us her hand from the off. Perhaps it's her desire to get shot of the ghost of Billie Holiday to whom she has often been compared… But in 2018, Madeline Peyroux is very much Madeleine Peyroux! Style, voice, writing, she has mastered every part of her art and has nothing left to prove. This time, she leaves covers behind and offers new songs, written or co-written with Patrick Warren (Bonnie Raitt, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen), Brian MacLeod (Leonard Cohen, Tina Turner), David Baerwald (Joni Mitchell, Sheryl Crow) and producer Larry Klein (Joni Mitchell, Shawn Colvin, Herbie Hancock). The lyrics are often politically-engaged, and she sets them lovingly to soft-to-downright-melancholy music. The overall effect is one of weightlessness. The arrangements and the production have a velvety feel, and while she takes on Paul Eluard's powerful poem Liberté, she does it with a delicate touch that renders the words even stronger. As is often the case with Peyroux, the boundaries between jazz, pop, soul, blues and folk are savvily blurred together. This makes for a great showcase for her voice, one of the most addictive of her generation. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Jazz - Verschenen op 16 september 2016 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Recorded at the Parish Church of Saint Mary the Virgin in Great Milton, Oxfordshire, England, Madeleine Peyroux's eighth studio album, 2016's Secular Hymns, finds the vocalist/guitarist delivering a stripped-down, largely acoustic set of warm, eclectic cover tunes. Backing Peyroux this time out are guitarist/vocalist Jon Herington and bassist/vocalist Barak Mori, both highly sought-after New York-based musicians with deep jazz, blues, and rock credits. While technically a studio album, Secular Hymns was recorded as if a live concert, a choice inspired by Peyroux's 2015 performance at the venue. The result is an album that's a 180-degree turn from her previous effort, 2013's ambitious homage to Ray Charles, The Blue Room. Where that album framed Peyroux's earthy vocals in organ, electric guitar, horns, and a lush orchestra, Secular Hymns feels like you are sitting in the front row of an intimate Peyroux concert. Here, Peyroux eases into the session, kicking things off with a supple, harmonized, Western swing-tinged take on John Greer & the Rhythm Rockers' 1951 side "Got You on My Mind." She then struts through Tom Waits' "Tango Till They're Sore," imbuing the song with a wry sensuality that's equal parts Billie Holiday and Marlene Dietrich. Despite the acoustic, minimalist nature of the production, Peyroux still manages to defy expectations, offering up a delicately swaggering take on Allen Toussaint's "Everything I Do Gonh Be Funky (From Now On)" and transforming Linton Kwesi Johnson's reggae anthem "More Time" into a something that sounds improbably like Eartha Kitt doing a cabaret homage to Bob Marley. Thankfully, it works, as do other selections including her more traditional readings of songs like the swinging Sister Rosetta Tharpe number "Shout Sister Shout" and her folky, sad-eyed version of Townes Van Zandt's "The Highway Kind." Particular effective is her bittersweet take on Stephen Foster's parlor song "Hard Times Come Again No More." A poignant rumination on life's inequities and hardships, particularly those visited on the less fortunate in society, the song is a perfect fit for Peyroux's throaty, highly resonant voice, an instrument that has only ripened in the decades since her debut. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 13 september 2019 | Ameritz

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Jazz - Verschenen op 19 mei 2017 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 januari 2011 | Universal Music Group International

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Country - Verschenen op 1 januari 2009 | Decca Music Group Ltd.