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Rock - Verschenen op 27 november 1970 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
All Things Must Pass (1970) is het derde soloalbum en het eerste album dat George Harrison na het uiteenvallen van The Beatles uitbracht. De plaat wordt nog steeds tot een van de beste albums gerekend van de in 2001 overleden gitarist. In 2021 wordt een speciale jubileumeditie van het album uitgebracht, met daarop niet eerder uitgebrachte versies van de nummers. © TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 27 november 1970 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Booklet Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
All Things Must Pass (1970) is het derde soloalbum en het eerste album dat George Harrison na het uiteenvallen van The Beatles uitbracht. De plaat wordt nog steeds tot een van de beste albums gerekend van de in 2001 overleden gitarist. In 2021 wordt een speciale jubileumeditie van het album uitgebracht, met daarop niet eerder uitgebrachte versies van de nummers. © TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 7 mei 2012 | Universal Music Enterprises

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Hi-Res Audio
Originally released as part of the deluxe Blu-ray edition of Martin Scorsese's 2011 documentary George Harrison: Living in the Material World, the 2012 disc Early Takes, Vol. 1 rounds up ten of George Harrison's demos dating from the '70s. The exact dates are fuzzy, as the liner notes are little more than hagiography, but a quick scan of the titles pegs the great bulk of them -- six, to be precise -- from All Things Must Pass, with two others dating from 1976's Thirty Three & 1/3 ("Let It Be Me," "Woman Don't You Cry for Me), another from Living in the Material World, the 1973 album ("The Light That Has Lighted the World), and, finally, a perfectly fine cover of Dylan's "Mama, You've Been on My Mind." Several of these are solo acoustic demos, some are rough band run-throughs, and nothing is all that far removed from the finished product, so the collection winds up just a tad anticlimactic for containing nothing but unreleased music: it all feels cozy. And while it's hard not to wish there were a surprise or two along the way, the familiar warmth certainly has its charms, too. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 27 november 1970 | BEATLES CATALOG MKT (C91)

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When it was originally released in 1971, George Harrison's first solo rock album managed the impressive feat of being both expansive and consistent. With four LP sides of gentle, spiritual, and highly melodic songcraft and two more of loose, muscular rock jams, it was a consummate expression of everything that Harrison had creatively held onto during the Beatles years. But for an album that was already seen as sprawling on its original release, it's simultaneously surprising and appropriate that there was enough unreleased and complementary material to fill up this expansive new edition beyond what had already been included on the 30th anniversary edition. That earlier edition tweaked the album's running order for the sake of CD sequencing, tacked on a good selection of bonus tracks, and was remastered under Harrison's guidance, making it feel like a definitive statement. However, it was again remastered 10 years later, and now, a half-century after it was originally released, we are getting even more bonus tracks, another remastering, and, perhaps most notably, a brand new mix. The album's original running order is restored here, but that's where fealty to the original All Things Must Pass ends. All of the studio recordings have been dramatically remixed, dialing back the overwrought reverb from Phil Spector's original production (an approach that Harrison wanted for the 30th, but demurred on) and making numerous other tweaks throughout. Of course, as with anything related to the Beatles, these changes are not without controversy. Some fans will love them, some fans will hate them, but to anyone coming to this album with no preconceptions, the new mixes evoke the warmth and spaciousness of the original album without some of the touches that now sound quite a bit dated. Beyond the new mix though, there's lots more to dig into. The 30 demo versions reveal these songs in their most simple forms, and while many of them may give some diehard fans the fully de-Spectored version of these songs they've been clamoring for, the truth is, the true power of this work came from the combination of songwriting, playing, and studio care that went into it. Far more illuminating and enjoyable is the final disc of alternate takes. Yes, there are some goofy asides—"Isn't it so shitty/ Isn’t it a pain/ How we do so many takes" from "Isn't It A Pity (Take 14)"—and (amazingly!) a Lennon/McCartney number ("Get Back"). But among those bits of studio detritus are nestled gems like take 27 of "Isn't It A Pity," which presents the song in a slower version that is dirgelike in its intensity, yet still possessed of its innate ethereality. The fact that a cut like this was kept in the vault all this time either means that this edition is indeed the final word on this classic album or that there's even more in store for the centennial edition that will be downloaded straight into our brains. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Rock - Verschenen op 27 november 1970 | BEATLES CATALOG MKT (C91)

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When it was originally released in 1971, George Harrison's first solo rock album managed the impressive feat of being both expansive and consistent. With four LP sides of gentle, spiritual, and highly melodic songcraft and two more of loose, muscular rock jams, it was a consummate expression of everything that Harrison had creatively held onto during the Beatles years. But for an album that was already seen as sprawling on its original release, it's simultaneously surprising and appropriate that there was enough unreleased and complementary material to fill up this expansive new edition beyond what had already been included on the 30th anniversary edition. That earlier edition tweaked the album's running order for the sake of CD sequencing, tacked on a good selection of bonus tracks, and was remastered under Harrison's guidance, making it feel like a definitive statement. However, it was again remastered 10 years later, and now, a half-century after it was originally released, we are getting even more bonus tracks, another remastering, and, perhaps most notably, a brand new mix. The album's original running order is restored here, but that's where fealty to the original All Things Must Pass ends. All of the studio recordings have been dramatically remixed, dialing back the overwrought reverb from Phil Spector's original production (an approach that Harrison wanted for the 30th, but demurred on) and making numerous other tweaks throughout. Of course, as with anything related to the Beatles, these changes are not without controversy. Some fans will love them, some fans will hate them, but to anyone coming to this album with no preconceptions, the new mixes evoke the warmth and spaciousness of the original album without some of the touches that now sound quite a bit dated. Beyond the new mix though, there's lots more to dig into. The 30 demo versions reveal these songs in their most simple forms, and while many of them may give some diehard fans the fully de-Spectored version of these songs they've been clamoring for, the truth is, the true power of this work came from the combination of songwriting, playing, and studio care that went into it. Far more illuminating and enjoyable is the final disc of alternate takes. Yes, there are some goofy asides—"Isn't it so shitty/ Isn’t it a pain/ How we do so many takes" from "Isn't It A Pity (Take 14)"—and (amazingly!) a Lennon/McCartney number ("Get Back"). But among those bits of studio detritus are nestled gems like take 27 of "Isn't It A Pity," which presents the song in a slower version that is dirgelike in its intensity, yet still possessed of its innate ethereality. The fact that a cut like this was kept in the vault all this time either means that this edition is indeed the final word on this classic album or that there's even more in store for the centennial edition that will be downloaded straight into our brains. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2007 | Parlophone

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Rock - Verschenen op 30 mei 1973 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Booklet
How does an instant multimillion-selling album become an underrated minor masterpiece? George Harrison's follow-up to the triple-disc All Things Must Pass (which had been comprised of an immense backlog of great songs that he'd built up across the last years of his time with the Beatles), Living in the Material World was necessarily a letdown for fans and critics, appearing as it did two-and-a-half-years after its predecessor without that earlier album's outsized songbag from which to draw. And it does seem like Harrison narrowed his sights and his vision for this record, which has neither the bold musical expansiveness nor the overwhelming confidence of its predecessor. And while there are still some beautiful and delightfully lyrical, charming moments throughout, few of the melodies are as instantly memorable and compelling as those of most of the songs on the earlier record, and some of the most serious songs here, such as "The Light That Has Lighted the World," seem weighed down with their own sense of purpose, in ways that All Things Must Pass mostly (but not entirely) avoided. What Living in the Material World does show off far better than the earlier record, however, is Harrison's guitar work -- unlike the prior album, with its outsized contingent of musicians including Eric Clapton and Dave Mason on guitars, he's the only axeman on Material World, and it does represent his solo playing and songwriting at something of a peak. Most notable are his blues stylings and slide playing, glimpsed on some of the later Beatles sessions but often overlooked by fans. "Don't Let Me Wait Too Long" is driven by a delectable acoustic rhythm guitar and has a great beat. The title track isn't great, but it does benefit from a tight, hard, band sound, and "The Lord Loves the One (That Loves the Lord)," despite its title, is the high point of the record, a fast, rollicking, funky, bluesy jewel with a priceless guitar break (maybe the best of Harrison's solo career) that should have been at the heart of any of Harrison's concert set. Vocally, Harrison was always an acquired taste, and he isn't as self-consciously pretty or restrained here, but it is an honest performance, and his singing soars magnificently in his heartfelt performance on "The Day the World Gets Round," a song that resembles "Beware of Darkness" and also, curiously enough, "Across the Universe." Perhaps a less serious title would have represented the album better, but nobody was looking for self-effacement from any ex-Beatle except Ringo (who's also here, natch) in those days. Even in the summer of 1973, after years of war and strife and disillusionment, some of us were still sort of looking -- to borrow a phrase from a Lennon-McCartney song -- or hoping to get from them something like "the word" that would make us free. And George, God love him, had the temerity to actually oblige, to the extent of painting a few signs here and there suggesting where he'd found it and where we might, all with some great playing and some laughs. And it wasn't all serious -- there are pointed moments of humor throughout, especially on the title song; and "Sue Me, Sue You Blues" was a follow-up to Beatles-era tracks such as "Only a Northern Song," dealing with the internal workings and business side of his lingering involvement with the group, in this case the multiple, overlapping, sometimes rotating lawsuits that attended the breakup of their organization. And one track, "Try Some, Buy Some," which he'd given away to Ronnie Spector at the time, actually dated back to the All Things Must Pass sessions. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2004 | Parlophone

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2002 | Parlophone

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2007 | Parlophone

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Rock - Verschenen op 9 december 1974 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Booklet
With his first solo tour looming ahead in November and December of 1974, George Harrison felt impelled to rush out a new album, and even a steadily worsening case of laryngitis wouldn't stop him. Would that it did, for the appallingly weak state of his voice would torpedo this album and the tour, to his great embarrassment. "Hari's on Tour (Express)" -- with Tom Scott's L.A. Express churning out all-pro L.A.-studio jazz/rock -- gets the doomed project off to a spirited start, but it's an instrumental, and Harrison's vocal distress becomes obvious to all in the next track, "Simply Shady." Some of George's tunes -- particularly the title track and the exquisite "Far East Man" -- might have benefited from waiting for a better time to record, while others probably could not have been saved. The recording quality, like the voice, has a raw, coarse-grained sound that belies the impeccable musicianship. Dark Horse is perhaps most notorious for Harrison's bitter, slipshod rewrite of the Everly Brothers' hit "Bye Bye Love" -- referring openly to George's wife Pattie running off with Eric Clapton and, for good measure, having both of them on the session! Dark Horse would also be the name of Harrison's soon-to-be-formed new label, as well as a metaphor for the underestimated Beatle who leaped artistically and commercially ahead of his three colleagues immediately after the Beatles' breakup. Unfortunately, this album -- despite its humorous Sgt. Pepper parody on the cover and outright plea to critics on the margins of the inside jacket to go easy on its contents -- would only undermine Harrison's hard-fought campaign for respect. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2007 | Parlophone

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Pop - Verschenen op 1 januari 2009 | EMI Catalogue

Booklet
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2007 | Parlophone

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Rock - Verschenen op 22 september 1975 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Booklet
Despite George Harrison's reputation for solemn, lugubriously paced albums in the early '70s -- and this one is mostly no exception -- the jacket is full of jokes, from the eaten-away Apple logo (the Apple label would expire at year's end) to the punning title, the list of non-participants, and the mischievous grin of the ex-Beatle above the arch caption "OHNOTHIMAGEN" ("Oh, not him again!"). The record gets off to a great start with the instantly winning single "You" -- a bit of which is then repeated to open side two. But here, the basic idea and instrumental track come from February 1971, during George's most fertile period, dressed up with vocals and string synthesizer four years later. One of George's most beautifully harmonized, majestic, strangely underrated ballads "The Answer's at the End" -- whose inspiring lyric was based upon an inscription on George's home by its builder, Sir Frank Crisp -- comes next, followed by "This Guitar (Can't Keep from Crying)," an attractive sequel to "While My Guitar Gently Weeps." At this point, the devoted fan's hopes go up; could this be an unsung masterpiece? But George has fired off his best stuff first, and the record slowly and inexorably tails off, closing with a baffling salute to ex-Bonzo Dog Band member "Legs" Larry Smith. Yet despite its stretches of treadmill material, Extra Texture has worn better as a whole than its Apple neighbors Dark Horse and even much of Living in the Material World, for even the lesser tunes reveal a few musical blossoms upon re-listening and the front-loaded songs are among the best of his solo career. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Booklet
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Rock - Verschenen op 27 november 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 november 1968 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Booklet
The first Beatle solo album -- as well as the first Apple album -- was a minor eruption of the pent-up energies of George Harrison, who was busy composing this offbeat score to the film Wonderwall as Magical Mystery Tour raced up the charts. With the subcontinental influence now firmly in the driver's seat, the score is mostly given over to the solemn, atmospheric drones of Indian music. Yet, as a whole, it's a fascinating if musically slender mishmash of sounds from East and West, everything casually juxtaposed or superimposed without a care in the world. Harrison himself does not appear as a player or singer; rather, he presides over the groups of Indian and British musicians, with half of the cues recorded in London, the other half in Bombay. The Indian tracks are professionally executed selections cut into film cue-sized bites, sometimes mixed up with a rock beat, never permitted to develop much. Touches of Harrison's whimsical side can be heard in the jaunty, honky tonk, tack piano-dominated "Drilling a Home" and happy-trails lope of "Cowboy Museum," as well as a title like "Wonderwall to Be Here." Occasionally, the overt footsteps of a Beatle can be heard: "Party Secombe" is a medium-tempo rock track that should remind the connoisseur of "Flying"; "Dream Scene" has Indian vocals moving back and forth between the loudspeakers over backwards electronic loops. As this and Harrison's second experimental release, Electronic Sound, undoubtedly proved, pigeonholing this Beatle was a dangerous thing. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2004 | Parlophone

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Pop - Verschenen op 7 mei 2012 | Universal Music Enterprises

Originally released as part of the deluxe Blu-ray edition of Martin Scorsese's 2011 documentary George Harrison: Living in the Material World, the 2012 disc Early Takes, Vol. 1 rounds up ten of George Harrison's demos dating from the '70s. The exact dates are fuzzy, as the liner notes are little more than hagiography, but a quick scan of the titles pegs the great bulk of them -- six, to be precise -- from All Things Must Pass, with two others dating from 1976's Thirty Three & 1/3 ("Let It Be Me," "Woman Don't You Cry for Me), another from Living in the Material World, the 1973 album ("The Light That Has Lighted the World), and, finally, a perfectly fine cover of Dylan's "Mama, You've Been on My Mind." Several of these are solo acoustic demos, some are rough band run-throughs, and nothing is all that far removed from the finished product, so the collection winds up just a tad anticlimactic for containing nothing but unreleased music: it all feels cozy. And while it's hard not to wish there were a surprise or two along the way, the familiar warmth certainly has its charms, too. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo