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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 1990 | deutsche harmonia mundi

Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
First revived in the 1970s, Bohemian composer Jan Dismas Zelenka was once touted as the Arcimboldo of music owing to the bizarre twists and turns of his instrumental music, which accounts for only a tiny part of his output. While this was effective marketing and won him a certain avant-garde cachet, the vast majority of Zelenka's music is of the sacred vocal variety, and overall it is probably more useful to view him as a contemporary of Johann Sebastian Bach able to pursue professionally what the proudly Lutheran Bach could only do vicariously: compose Catholic service music. In the case of Zelenka's "Missa ultimae" ZWV 19-21, he composed three masses in the same vicarious manner as Bach with his great Mass in B minor; these works, intended to number six rather than three but left incomplete by Zelenka, were not intended for services but as art music. On Deutsche Harmonia Mundi's Jan Dismas Zelenka: Missa dei Filii, soloists Nancy Argenta, Michael Chance, Christoph Prégardien, and Gordon Jones with the Kammerchor Stuttgart under Frieder Bernius and Tafelmusik with Jeanne Lamon sensitively perform the second of these masses, consisting only of a Kyrie and Gloria. Despite the change of venue, Zelenka's music remains highly original here, even comparable to that of Bach except that it is neither as busy or as ornate, though it remains just as harmonically rich and skillful in its projection of the text -- check out the subtle rhythmic drive and harmonic color of "Qui sedes ad dextaram Patris." The Litaniae Laurentanae "Salus infirmorum," unlike the "Missa ultimae," was written in 1744 to be performed when Electress Maria Josepha of Austria had just recovered from an extended illness -- it was one of Zelenka's very last works. Electress Maria Josepha must have appreciated Zelenka's musical get-well card, as when he died in 1745 she purchased his entire manuscript collection, preserving it intact for posterity. Too bad someone didn't do that for Bach! This Deutsche Harmonia Mundi effort was made in 1989, concurrently with the first publication of Litaniae Laurentanae "Salus infirmorum." Recorded at the Reutlingen Evangelical Church in Gönningen, the recording is a little quiet, though very easy to listen to. About the only negative thing one can say about the performance is that there are tiny lapses of coordination among the members of the Kammerchor Stuttgart here and there, and these are momentary. This is not too surprising, as Zelenka's music is so unfamiliar; one thing about Bach is that you can always tell where he is going, not so with Zelenka. Enthusiasts of Zelenka's music should consider Deutsche Harmonia Mundi's Jan Dismas Zelenka: Missa dei Filii a must; others more generally interested in the sacred choral music of the German Baroque will find it an interesting and pleasing byway. © TiVo
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Koormuziek - Verschenen op 14 juni 2019 | haenssler CLASSIC

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2016 | Orfeo

Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 4 november 2016 | Carus

Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 18 september 2020 | Carus

Booklet
The audience of the Schleswig-Holstein Music Festival experienced a great musical event when the Kammerchor Stuttgart, conducted by its founder Frieder Bernius, performed Luigi Cherubini's Messe Solennelle No. 2 in D Minor. The soloists of the evening were Ruth Ziesak, soprano, Christa Mayer, contralto, Christoph Genz, tenor, and Thomas E. Bauer, bass. The recording of this truly extraordinary work is now available on this album. After a beginning which seems familiar, unforeseen, imaginative and witty turns lead melodic progressions and harmonic developments into entirely new directions. The harmonic variety is impressive, and chromaticism plays no less important a role. Subtle instrumentation lends many sections an exquisite sonority. And last but not least, the deeply felt interpretation of the text by means of melodic, rhythmic or harmonic figures, as well as by dynamics and tempo is one of the outstanding features of the work, highlighting the performers' brilliance. © Carus
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Sacred Oratorios - Verschenen op 7 april 2015 | Carus

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 17 april 2020 | Carus

Booklet
Goethe’s dramatic ballad Die erste Walpurgisnacht inspired Mendelssohn to compose a magnificent and vivid portrayal of the conflict between an old pagan community and the new aspirations of Christianization, between belief and superstition and the witches’ sabbath, steeped in legend. The composition became one of his most successful choral works. Now Frieder Bernius has recorded the work with the Kammerchor Stuttgart, the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen, and Renée Morloc, David Fischer, Stephan Genz, and David Jerusalem in the solo parts. The recording also includes excerpts from Mendelssohn’s incidental music Oedipus at Colonos to Sophocles’ tragedy. With this recording Frieder Bernius once again demonstrates why his Mendelssohn recordings have achieved benchmark status worldwide. © Carus
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Missen, passies, requiems - Verschenen op 23 april 2010 | Sony Classical

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 1990 | deutsche harmonia mundi

First revived in the 1970s, Bohemian composer Jan Dismas Zelenka was once touted as the Arcimboldo of music owing to the bizarre twists and turns of his instrumental music, which accounts for only a tiny part of his output. While this was effective marketing and won him a certain avant-garde cachet, the vast majority of Zelenka's music is of the sacred vocal variety, and overall it is probably more useful to view him as a contemporary of Johann Sebastian Bach able to pursue professionally what the proudly Lutheran Bach could only do vicariously: compose Catholic service music. In the case of Zelenka's "Missa ultimae" ZWV 19-21, he composed three masses in the same vicarious manner as Bach with his great Mass in B minor; these works, intended to number six rather than three but left incomplete by Zelenka, were not intended for services but as art music. On Deutsche Harmonia Mundi's Jan Dismas Zelenka: Missa dei Filii, soloists Nancy Argenta, Michael Chance, Christoph Prégardien, and Gordon Jones with the Kammerchor Stuttgart under Frieder Bernius and Tafelmusik with Jeanne Lamon sensitively perform the second of these masses, consisting only of a Kyrie and Gloria. Despite the change of venue, Zelenka's music remains highly original here, even comparable to that of Bach except that it is neither as busy or as ornate, though it remains just as harmonically rich and skillful in its projection of the text -- check out the subtle rhythmic drive and harmonic color of "Qui sedes ad dextaram Patris." The Litaniae Laurentanae "Salus infirmorum," unlike the "Missa ultimae," was written in 1744 to be performed when Electress Maria Josepha of Austria had just recovered from an extended illness -- it was one of Zelenka's very last works. Electress Maria Josepha must have appreciated Zelenka's musical get-well card, as when he died in 1745 she purchased his entire manuscript collection, preserving it intact for posterity. Too bad someone didn't do that for Bach! This Deutsche Harmonia Mundi effort was made in 1989, concurrently with the first publication of Litaniae Laurentanae "Salus infirmorum." Recorded at the Reutlingen Evangelical Church in Gönningen, the recording is a little quiet, though very easy to listen to. About the only negative thing one can say about the performance is that there are tiny lapses of coordination among the members of the Kammerchor Stuttgart here and there, and these are momentary. This is not too surprising, as Zelenka's music is so unfamiliar; one thing about Bach is that you can always tell where he is going, not so with Zelenka. Enthusiasts of Zelenka's music should consider Deutsche Harmonia Mundi's Jan Dismas Zelenka: Missa dei Filii a must; others more generally interested in the sacred choral music of the German Baroque will find it an interesting and pleasing byway. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 20 januari 2017 | Carus

Booklet
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2016 | Orfeo

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Opera - Verschenen op 1 januari 2016 | Orfeo

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 4 december 2020 | Sony Classical

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 28 maart 2014 | Masterworks

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Religieuze vocale muziek - Verschenen op 1 januari 1990 | deutsche harmonia mundi

First revived in the 1970s, Bohemian composer Jan Dismas Zelenka was once touted as the Arcimboldo of music owing to the bizarre twists and turns of his instrumental music, which accounts for only a tiny part of his output. While this was effective marketing and won him a certain avant-garde cachet, the vast majority of Zelenka's music is of the sacred vocal variety, and overall it is probably more useful to view him as a contemporary of Johann Sebastian Bach able to pursue professionally what the proudly Lutheran Bach could only do vicariously: compose Catholic service music. In the case of Zelenka's "Missa ultimae" ZWV 19-21, he composed three masses in the same vicarious manner as Bach with his great Mass in B minor; these works, intended to number six rather than three but left incomplete by Zelenka, were not intended for services but as art music. On Deutsche Harmonia Mundi's Jan Dismas Zelenka: Missa dei Filii, soloists Nancy Argenta, Michael Chance, Christoph Prégardien, and Gordon Jones with the Kammerchor Stuttgart under Frieder Bernius and Tafelmusik with Jeanne Lamon sensitively perform the second of these masses, consisting only of a Kyrie and Gloria. Despite the change of venue, Zelenka's music remains highly original here, even comparable to that of Bach except that it is neither as busy or as ornate, though it remains just as harmonically rich and skillful in its projection of the text -- check out the subtle rhythmic drive and harmonic color of "Qui sedes ad dextaram Patris." The Litaniae Laurentanae "Salus infirmorum," unlike the "Missa ultimae," was written in 1744 to be performed when Electress Maria Josepha of Austria had just recovered from an extended illness -- it was one of Zelenka's very last works. Electress Maria Josepha must have appreciated Zelenka's musical get-well card, as when he died in 1745 she purchased his entire manuscript collection, preserving it intact for posterity. Too bad someone didn't do that for Bach! This Deutsche Harmonia Mundi effort was made in 1989, concurrently with the first publication of Litaniae Laurentanae "Salus infirmorum." Recorded at the Reutlingen Evangelical Church in Gönningen, the recording is a little quiet, though very easy to listen to. About the only negative thing one can say about the performance is that there are tiny lapses of coordination among the members of the Kammerchor Stuttgart here and there, and these are momentary. This is not too surprising, as Zelenka's music is so unfamiliar; one thing about Bach is that you can always tell where he is going, not so with Zelenka. Enthusiasts of Zelenka's music should consider Deutsche Harmonia Mundi's Jan Dismas Zelenka: Missa dei Filii a must; others more generally interested in the sacred choral music of the German Baroque will find it an interesting and pleasing byway. © TiVo
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CD€ 14,49

Klassiek - Verschenen op 19 september 2005 | Sony Classical

From
CD€ 14,49

Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 1990 | deutsche harmonia mundi

First revived in the 1970s, Bohemian composer Jan Dismas Zelenka was once touted as the Arcimboldo of music owing to the bizarre twists and turns of his instrumental music, which accounts for only a tiny part of his output. While this was effective marketing and won him a certain avant-garde cachet, the vast majority of Zelenka's music is of the sacred vocal variety, and overall it is probably more useful to view him as a contemporary of Johann Sebastian Bach able to pursue professionally what the proudly Lutheran Bach could only do vicariously: compose Catholic service music. In the case of Zelenka's "Missa ultimae" ZWV 19-21, he composed three masses in the same vicarious manner as Bach with his great Mass in B minor; these works, intended to number six rather than three but left incomplete by Zelenka, were not intended for services but as art music. On Deutsche Harmonia Mundi's Jan Dismas Zelenka: Missa dei Filii, soloists Nancy Argenta, Michael Chance, Christoph Prégardien, and Gordon Jones with the Kammerchor Stuttgart under Frieder Bernius and Tafelmusik with Jeanne Lamon sensitively perform the second of these masses, consisting only of a Kyrie and Gloria. Despite the change of venue, Zelenka's music remains highly original here, even comparable to that of Bach except that it is neither as busy or as ornate, though it remains just as harmonically rich and skillful in its projection of the text -- check out the subtle rhythmic drive and harmonic color of "Qui sedes ad dextaram Patris." The Litaniae Laurentanae "Salus infirmorum," unlike the "Missa ultimae," was written in 1744 to be performed when Electress Maria Josepha of Austria had just recovered from an extended illness -- it was one of Zelenka's very last works. Electress Maria Josepha must have appreciated Zelenka's musical get-well card, as when he died in 1745 she purchased his entire manuscript collection, preserving it intact for posterity. Too bad someone didn't do that for Bach! This Deutsche Harmonia Mundi effort was made in 1989, concurrently with the first publication of Litaniae Laurentanae "Salus infirmorum." Recorded at the Reutlingen Evangelical Church in Gönningen, the recording is a little quiet, though very easy to listen to. About the only negative thing one can say about the performance is that there are tiny lapses of coordination among the members of the Kammerchor Stuttgart here and there, and these are momentary. This is not too surprising, as Zelenka's music is so unfamiliar; one thing about Bach is that you can always tell where he is going, not so with Zelenka. Enthusiasts of Zelenka's music should consider Deutsche Harmonia Mundi's Jan Dismas Zelenka: Missa dei Filii a must; others more generally interested in the sacred choral music of the German Baroque will find it an interesting and pleasing byway. © TiVo
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Religieuze vocale muziek - Verschenen op 1 juli 2009 | Brilliant Classics

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 januari 1996 | Berlin Classics