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Pop - Verschenen op 21 augustus 2020 | Mute

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Pop - Verschenen op 28 november 1988 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Pop - Verschenen op 12 maart 2021 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Pop - Verschenen op 14 oktober 1991 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Pop - Verschenen op 16 oktober 1989 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Pop - Verschenen op 23 september 2014 | Mute

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Pop - Verschenen op 13 december 1999 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Pop - Verschenen op 6 juli 2018 | Mute

After more than thirty years, Erasure is still filling up the Apollo Hammersmith, in London. The British synth-pop duo holds an endless supply of hit songs, sign of their power. Things come in threes: following World Be Gone in 2017 and World Beyond in 2018, Andy Bell and Vince Clarke complete their trilogy with World Be Live. Twenty-four titles to walk you through their entire career. An electro pop that puts emphasis on love, choirs that harmonise with Bell’s vocals, and a crowd in complete harmony. Right from the show’s opening with the disco anthem Oh L’Amour, the listener is blissfully thrown right back in the 1990s. Over an hour and a half of roller coasters between electro ballads and dance pop, effortlessly switching between Blue Savannah and a cover of Blondie’s Atomic. Getting to Stop, Erasure merge with their audience who sing at the top of their voice for each chorus. Nothing here is ironic. The irregular and unusual beats, the beauty of arrangements and the ability to simulate the presence of an orchestra on stage all turn this timeless duo into an inimitable band. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
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Pop - Verschenen op 18 april 2020 | Mute, a BMG Company

Pop - Verschenen op 8 november 2013 | Mute

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If the holidays are a time of miracles, it's only fitting that Snow Globe at one point combines Kraftwerk beats with a 16th century song, and all by way of Steeleye Span. The track where it happens, "Gaudete", is the same carol that the Span had a hit with in the '70s, but the miracle bit is that Erasure's thoroughly modern take on the cut could warm the heart of a deep space robot, echoing into the vacuum with sequencers, sacred vocals, church bells, and not the slightest hint of cheese. It's vocalist Andy Bell's triumphant and sincere performance of the carol that really sells it, and with years of seeing poignancy and camp as two sides of the same coin, he's set up for a win on Snow Globe, a holiday album that's nostalgic for the animated Christmas television specials of the past with its artwork, but bold enough to drop "I don't believe in your religion/I only know what I can see" during its opening number "Bells of Love (Isabelle's of Love)". There are many original holiday songs here, vividly depicting the time of year when many reflect and roll wistfully through the nostalgic thoughts in their head, all in an effort to gather some spiritual warmth after being driven inside by cold days and long nights. Vince Clarke's brand of electro-pop is the ghosts of Christmases future, past, and present all at once, with the crispness of the MP3 age meeting bleeps and bloops that could have been on Erasure album number one (1986). Old favorites get the Erasure spin as "Silent Night" is delivered dramatically as if it was Dylan Thomas' "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night", while "White Christmas" is an almost audio verite piece, covering Bell's scratchy record performance with a Pachinko bar worth of downtown Tokyo sounds.That's much more effort than veteran acts usually pour into a holiday album, but with odd, quirky, and cheeky ideas popping in and out, Snow Globe is still for those predisposed to the duo. Think of it as a personal and meaningful gift for fans, not just some "didn't think much about it" trinket or faceless gift certificate. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 1 oktober 2021 | Mute

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Pop - Verschenen op 13 december 1999 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 19 mei 2017 | Mute

Erasure's self-produced 17th studio album, World Be Gone finds the duo honing in on a reflective synth pop befitting the wind-down portion of the dance. Affected by the political upheaval of the period leading up to its release in the spring of 2017, it features a few calls to action amid selections that are more generally about the need for love. The rousing opener, "Love You to the Sky," is a straight-up love song (and classic earworm) that begins with Krupa-like drums, establishing a thumping drumbeat that makes it the closest thing to a club track on the record. More sociopolitical in nature are "Lousy Sum of Nothing," a plea for political engagement and caring, and "Oh What a World." The latter is a darker, gothy entry that opens with the lyrics "I want to be in the witness protection program/I don't like what we've become," later adding "A million voices go unheard/What became of wanting to be free?" It builds to a gospel-tinged chorus for singer Andy Bell, who provides his own choral-style harmonies. "Still It's Not Over" is another song that begs for social change, with "a time for quiet contemplation dying on the steps of city hall." A keyboard ballad with minimal drums, it puts all the focus on Bell's words and the melodic payoff of the chorus. Elsewhere, the lyrics "Please talk to me as if I'm equal" carry a double meaning that works in the context of a relationship or greater society. While the album's tone is certainly restrained, it's hopeful, too; "Sweet Summer Loving" exudes gratitude, and the final track, "Just a Little Love," parts on a bright note and four on the floor. While there's no real dance anthem in the bunch, World Be Gone does deliver on vocals and memorable Vince Clarke melodies, as well as on arrangements that add some oomph to slower tempos. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 23 september 2014 | Mute

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Pop - Verschenen op 3 december 2001 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Pop - Verschenen op 30 november 2018 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Pop - Verschenen op 10 mei 2019 | Mute, a BMG Company

Pop - Verschenen op 4 oktober 2011 | Mute

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Erasure's previous effort returned the synth pop duo to form, so on their 2011 release, and 14th overall, they take the logical step of handing over a bit of their legacy to an outside producer. Electropop enthusiast Frankmusik (Lady Gaga, Pet Shop Boys) is the wise choice made here, and the results are generally quite good, sometimes excellent. Many tracks benefit from the attractive combination of lead singer Andy Bell's increased lyric-writing skills and the hired producer's presentation of the 2011 house music "thwak," as both "I Lose Myself" and "Be with You" are fine acknowledgments of Gaga and Benny Benassi's dancefloor domination. Fans get to experience Vince Clarke’s fingerprints on "Fill Us with Fire" and "When I Start To (Break It All Down)," as the recent reunion of his Yaz project is reflected in the nocturnal synth pop and soul muscle driving these highlights. There's a cohesiveness issue that keeps this one off their top shelf, but Erasure have settled nicely into that groove that the best veteran bands often do. Last time out it was the vital release while this time it's the very attractive diversion, adding new flavors to a group that sounds much more inspired than you'd expect at this point. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Pop - Verschenen op 12 april 2019 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Pop - Verschenen op 22 september 2014 | Mute

Following a holiday album (2013's Snow Globe) with this "return to form" album means veteran duo Erasure are now on the cliched career revival path for aging pop stars, but maybe it's just by chance. Make that "likely," as The Violet Flame gets right down to dancey, inspired business on its opening "Dead of Night," a track that pumps with the beat of any given single off the duo's great 1989 album Wild!. Classic lyrics from Andy Bell speak to the morality play that club night can be ("Too many times you're forgiven/Now you cry like you're the victim") then the chorus is like a pair of bright red cha-cha heels (a joyful stuttering of "D-d-d-dead of night") that won't be ignored. If hearing Bell in his Maleficent costume is a decadent kind of delicious, he's still an excellent Sleeping Beauty as well, as the pumping "Paradise" welcomes a new soul mate with open arms and open heart. Synth man Vince Clarke is simpatico in these back-to-the-future surroundings, as the great "Be the One" sounds like he plundered the computer and found some early sketches of Yaz's "Only You." while "Under the Wave" could be seamlessly mixed with all the minimal bleeping and blooping on Depeche Mode's debut album Speak & Spell, also known as Clarke's last hurrah with the band. The big anthem this time out is "Elevation," a cut with the simplicity of Robin S's "Show Me Love" and lyrics preaching freedom to the dancing masses ("It makes you kinda wonder, what are we supposed to do/When the fate of many, is guided by the hand of few/Who-o-oa."), then there's the closing "Stayed a Little Late Last Night" and the heart-breaking "Smoke and Mirrors," both serving the roles of a soul-filling number that sticks to the bones. With all the elements in place, the late-era The Violet Flame sits on the top shelf of Erasure albums, and considering all the greatness in the back catalog, that's no easy task. © David Jeffries /TiVo

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