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Duo´s - Verschenen op 19 januari 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 étoiles de Classica
No-one could think that Edgar Moreau and David Kadouch had an easy job in selecting the programme for this album, which begins with the expansive and impressive Grand Dramatic Sonata (Grande sonate dramatique) "Titus et Bérénice", by Rita Strohl (1865-1941), a pseudonym of Aimée Marie Marguerite Mercédès Larousse La Villette, a French composer of the same vein as Franck or Saint-Saëns. Rita Strohl has gone down in history as an astounding character: she had the idea of creating a kind of French Bayreuth, La Grange, in Bièvres (!) with the support of Odilon Redon and a number of other artists of the day; it was done in aid of performing Rita's operas - monumental works, more than a match for any of the most colossal excesses of Scriabin: a Christian cycle, a Celtic cycle lasting five days, a Hindu cycle in seven. The sheer size of these projects was overwhelming, to say nothing of other troubles such as the start of the First World War and other personal troubles of Strohl's. All the same, this Sonata reveals in Strohl a figure bursting with talents and ideas, which Moreau and Kadouch bring to life with unstinting devotion. Poulenc's little-performed Sonata for Cello and Piano follows: a delicious taste of Poulenc's "light" output, which almost classes as salon music. The other great moment on the album is Franck's Sonata, as re-written by Jules Desart during the composer's lifetime. The album also offers a little rarity from Fernand de La Tombelle, one of the founding members of the Schola Cantorum, whose score relates to the work of Reynaldo Hahn. This ample album closes with a world-first Poulenc recording (such a thing is still possible!), Souvenirs. It is well-named: the piano part appears to recall (or prefigure) the dramas of Dialogues, while the cello, which only intervenes occasionally, shows off Poulenc's salon voice! © SM/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 23 oktober 2015 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
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Concerten voor cello - Verschenen op 15 februari 2019 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
This concerto begins with a march that is reminiscent of the first act of Beethoven’s Fidelio, which announces the arrival of the sinister character Pizarro - a jest that in turn sets the scene for the soloist's arrival on Jacques Offenbach’s Grand Concerto for Cello in G Major. The piece was tackled by Jérôme Pernoo in 2009 for Archiv Produktion. Twenty-two years his junior, it is the talented Edgar Moreau recording this work here; composed in Paris in 1847, the concerto is presented in a meticulous reconstruction by Jean-Christophe Keck, the undisputed specialist of the German composer. It’s a challenging work for the soloist, testing both virtuosity and stamina with a staggering duration of over forty minutes. Born before his time, the pianist Friedrich Gulda was an expert in musical hybridization, viewing classical music as too constraining. Being open to jazz and all other kinds of music, he wrote a concerto (one of the highlights on this record) for the cellist Heinrich Schiff in 1980. Composed for a varied ensemble of musicians, it mixes a big band with a classical orchestra, using an amp to accentuate the cello's quiet voice. The result is a perplexing score that fuses jazz, waltz (let's not forget that Gulda is Viennese), Ländler and a peaceful “Ranz des Vaches” – traditional melodies played in the Swiss Alps by herdsmen driving cattle. This is a deliciously iconoclastic record that’s as hair-raising as Edgar Moreau's messy locks and the cellist tackles the work with a beautifully playful approach. He is the youngest of a large group of French cellists working today who are perpetuating the appeal of this instrument that has been hugely popular in the western world since replacing the viola da gamba. The carefully selected musicians from the ensemble Les Forces Majeures are conducted with precision and humour by Raphaël Merlin. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 20 november 2020 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
Musical siblings appear to possess a special fascination for audiences, and it's undeniable that the combination of shared DNA and upbringing does often translate into musical partnering of a semi-telepathic closeness that can't be taught. With this is mind, it was perhaps only a matter of time before France's star young cellist, Edgar Moreau, brought his younger siblings into the studio for a first collaboration on the label he's been recording with himself since 2014. So here is “A Family Affair”, with violinists Raphaëlle and David, and pianist Jérémie – an unusual chamber combination of instruments, and thus not the easiest to find strong, original repertoire for; but also therefore an opportunity to stand out with some lesser-recorded fare.First up are Dvořák's Op. 47 Bagatelles. Composed for the domestic market in 1878, shortly after his career-launching Op. 46 Slavonic Dances and drawing equally heavily on Czech folk music, these five charm-filled shorts were originally scored not for piano but for the then-popular harmonium (a small pump organ). The Moreaus' readings are attractively bright-toned, polished and precise, the violins ear-prickingly blended, and with a lovely lilt and singing quality. That said, while these pieces could hardly be described as heavily profound, they do still contain more nuances and undercurrents to be teased out than are heard here. Consequently, anyone specifically after the Bagatelles should still head for the flowing, finely nuanced readings from Frank Braley and Ensemble Explorations on harmonia mundi; or, for especially dark-toned Czech plangency, Josef Suk and friends on Supraphon; or indeed, for a piano recording (the latter two both employ the harmonium), the Busch Trio and Maria Milstein bring a great combination of delicacy and folk kick to the proceedings.It's a pleasant surprise, therefore, to find that the most convincing interpretation of the two is actually the decidedly meatier Korngold Suite of 1930. This rarely heard work's demanding piano left hand part is a result of it having been commissioned by Paul Wittgenstein, the same pianist who commissioned Ravel's Piano Concerto for the Left Hand having lost his right arm fighting in the First World War, and here its big, bold opening piano cadenza is compellingly and commandingly brought off, followed by an equally compelling strings entry. Moving forwards, there's plenty more to admire: warmly luminous string tones, with some especially impeccable blending between the violins; a lovely Viennese grace to the Waltz; a real edge-of-the-seat urgency to the Groteske scherzo, its virtuosities cleanly, sparklingly, excitingly despatched; a long-lined, radiantly singing Lied; and the four always superbly tightly together as a conversing chamber family.Tucked between the two ensemble works are a pair of aria transcriptions for cello, including a beautifully understated Dvořák Song to the Moon.Moreau fans certainly shouldn't hesitate, and by anyone's standards it's a strong Korngold Suite. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 3 maart 2014 | Warner Classics International

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 19 januari 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 15 februari 2019 | Warner Classics International

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 3 maart 2014 | Warner Classics International