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Country - Verschenen op 23 maart 2001 | Lucky Dog

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Blues - Verschenen op 20 november 2020 | Yep Roc Records

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 21 juni 2011 | Yep Roc Records

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Pop - Verschenen op 15 juni 2004 | Yep Roc Records

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Folk - Verschenen op 15 augustus 2000 | HighTone Records

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Pop - Verschenen op 30 mei 2006 | Yep Roc Records

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Country - Verschenen op 16 juni 1998 | HighTone Records

Dave Alvin earned his crown as "the King of California" the hard way. A fourth-generation Californian, Alvin worked his way through various incarnations in order to arrive at this point. A longstanding monumental force in Los Angeles and California music, Alvin is essentially a blues player who writes and performs what he terms "American folk music." From Celtic and British folk tunes to early rock & roll, from classic blues and country & western to the Bakersfield sound, Alvin knows his stuff. Gleaning from all the genres, Alvin sits firmly upon his throne, creating a brand of music that is intelligent, insightful, and broad in scope. With Alvin at peace with his creative direction, Blackjack David picks up where King of California left off in 1994. More electric, Blackjack David almost rocks in places, as on "Abilene" and "New Highway." It ambles along nicely in other spots, too. The title cut, a traditional tune hundreds of years old, is given new life under the deft Alvin touch and a new arrangement. This effectively connects the past and the present in terms of Alvin and his place in musical history. "1968," written with fellow "405 Freeway Boy" Chris Gaffney, reveals a country twist. As interesting as anything either of them have written individually, the Tom Russell co-write "California Snow" is startling in its intensity. The final cut, "Tall Trees," is haunting and mysterious, displaying all of Alvin's power as a writer and communicator in a subtle fashion that demands attention. A Renaissance man, Dave Alvin continues to make and record music of integrity. © Jana Pendragon /TiVo
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Blues - Verschenen op 3 juni 2014 | Yep Roc Records

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Folk - Verschenen op 26 mei 2009 | Yep Roc Records

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Country - Verschenen op 28 oktober 2008 | HighTone Records

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 17 april 2012 | Yep Roc Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 1 mei 1994 | Craft Recordings

From the time the Blasters began making waves on the California rock scene, the standard line always was that Dave Alvin was the group's great songwriter and Phil Alvin was the great singer. And when Dave launched his solo career in 1987, he was frequently saddled with the criticism that he wasn't much of a vocalist compared to his brother. While dozens of blues and roots rock performers have built solid careers without singing any better than Dave Alvin, it's true that on Romeo's Escape and Blue Blvd his rough, flinty voice lacked the natural grace and projection of Phil's work with the Blasters. But on 1994's King of California, Alvin recorded a few new songs alongside a stack of classics from his back catalog (and some well-chosen covers) with a small acoustic combo backing him up. Suddenly freed from having to shout over a high-powered rock band, Alvin proved on this release just how good of a vocalist he really was. While Alvin's natural instrument still shows certain limitations on King of California, when allowed to play with the nooks and crannies of his voice he reveals a subtle but dramatic sense of phrasing and a marvelous feel for the characters he created; he's still no Al Green, but as a musical storyteller he's mighty impressive. Of course, it helps that he has a bunch of superb songs to work with here, including "Barn Burning," "Fourth of July," "Border Radio," and "Little Honey," and that the great Greg Leisz is on hand to anchor the band, produce the sessions, and play marvelous slide guitar. While King of California was often lumped in with the then-fashionable unplugged craze, in retrospect it was the album where Dave Alvin's abilities as a performer began to catch up with his gifts as a songwriter, pointing the way for his later albums Blackjack David and Public Domain. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 1 mei 1994 | Craft Recordings

Folk - Verschenen op 16 juni 1998 | Shout!

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Dave Alvin earned his crown as "the King of California" the hard way. A fourth-generation Californian, Alvin worked his way through various incarnations in order to arrive at this point. A longstanding monumental force in Los Angeles and California music, Alvin is essentially a blues player who writes and performs what he terms "American folk music." From Celtic and British folk tunes to early rock & roll, from classic blues and country & western to the Bakersfield sound, Alvin knows his stuff. Gleaning from all the genres, Alvin sits firmly upon his throne, creating a brand of music that is intelligent, insightful, and broad in scope. With Alvin at peace with his creative direction, Blackjack David picks up where King of California left off in 1994. More electric, Blackjack David almost rocks in places, as on "Abilene" and "New Highway." It ambles along nicely in other spots, too. The title cut, a traditional tune hundreds of years old, is given new life under the deft Alvin touch and a new arrangement. This effectively connects the past and the present in terms of Alvin and his place in musical history. "1968," written with fellow "405 Freeway Boy" Chris Gaffney, reveals a country twist. As interesting as anything either of them have written individually, the Tom Russell co-write "California Snow" is startling in its intensity. The final cut, "Tall Trees," is haunting and mysterious, displaying all of Alvin's power as a writer and communicator in a subtle fashion that demands attention. A Renaissance man, Dave Alvin continues to make and record music of integrity. © Jana Pendragon /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 20 augustus 1991 | HighTone Records

The only thing that mars this wonderful, rootsy singer/songwriter album is a heavy production hand and a drum sound attempting to give it a rock edge; consequently, some of the more beautiful songs like the title track suffer under the weight, but the final cut, "Dry River," is alone worth the price of the disc. Alvin's rock & roll pals come out to play -- Dwight Yoakam, David Hidalgo, saxophonist Lee Allen -- making the record essential for anyone interested in the state of California roots music in the early '90s. © Denise Sullivan /TiVo
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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 17 april 2012 | Yep Roc Records

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Rock - Verschenen op 20 september 1993 | HighTone Records

Dave Alvin's vision falters slightly, as none of the songs here are as instantly likable or classic as on previous outings. Perhaps stunted by more than half of the songs being co-writes ("Between the Cracks" with Tom Russell), Alvin's normally clear and simple approach is muddled, but the instrumentation is flawless and his regular all-star cast (John Doe, Syd Straw, and Katy Moffatt) is present. © Denise Sullivan /TiVo

Folk - Verschenen op 1 mei 1994 | Shout!

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From the time the Blasters began making waves on the California rock scene, the standard line always was that Dave Alvin was the group's great songwriter and Phil Alvin was the great singer. And when Dave launched his solo career in 1987, he was frequently saddled with the criticism that he wasn't much of a vocalist compared to his brother. While dozens of blues and roots rock performers have built solid careers without singing any better than Dave Alvin, it's true that on Romeo's Escape and Blue Blvd his rough, flinty voice lacked the natural grace and projection of Phil's work with the Blasters. But on 1994's King of California, Alvin recorded a few new songs alongside a stack of classics from his back catalog (and some well-chosen covers) with a small acoustic combo backing him up. Suddenly freed from having to shout over a high-powered rock band, Alvin proved on this release just how good of a vocalist he really was. While Alvin's natural instrument still shows certain limitations on King of California, when allowed to play with the nooks and crannies of his voice he reveals a subtle but dramatic sense of phrasing and a marvelous feel for the characters he created; he's still no Al Green, but as a musical storyteller he's mighty impressive. Of course, it helps that he has a bunch of superb songs to work with here, including "Barn Burning," "Fourth of July," "Border Radio," and "Little Honey," and that the great Greg Leisz is on hand to anchor the band, produce the sessions, and play marvelous slide guitar. While King of California was often lumped in with the then-fashionable unplugged craze, in retrospect it was the album where Dave Alvin's abilities as a performer began to catch up with his gifts as a songwriter, pointing the way for his later albums Blackjack David and Public Domain. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 24 januari 2006 | Yep Roc Records

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Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 17 april 2012 | Yep Roc Records