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Jazz - Verschenen op 26 februari 2013 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - Hi-Res Audio
Hagar's Song is a deeply intimate, intuitive offering from saxophonist Charles Lloyd and pianist Jason Moran, who has been a key part of Lloyd's quartet since 2007. The program is a collection of standards and originals, as well as one thorny, angular free improvisation ("Pictogram"). The title piece is a five-part suite dedicated to the memory of Lloyd's great-great grandmother, who spent most of her life as a slave. Its various sections reflect the harshness of that life, as well as moments of hope and determination. This work is not always "comfortable" to listen to, and it's not meant to be, but it is musically rich and emotionally taut. Lloyd has always celebrated his deep love of jazz and pop traditions, and those are in abundance here. The near-symbiotic dialogue the pair share on Billy Strayhorn's "Pretty Girl" and George Gershwin's "Bess You Is My Woman Now" offers both dialogic imagination as well as deep listening. (On the latter, Lloyd reveals how supple his tonal reach remains on the tenor as he nears 75; he sweeps from its middle register to something closer to the alto's.) The swinging read of "Mood Indigo" commences conventionally, but Moran's deft, blues-drenched, physical stride lends an urgency to the conversation. Likewise his punchy approach on Earl Hines' "Rosetta," where Lloyd takes the melody and opens up its joy vein, while Moran pumps it with rhythmic and lyric invention courtesy of his amazing left hand. Lloyd's love of rock and pop has its place here, too. On Bob Dylan's ballad "I Shall Be Released," Moran begins with a single repeating note, then a lone chord, as Lloyd tentatively states the melody. But by the second verse, he's quoting from Leon Russell's "A Song for You," as Moran moves its harmonic base to the modal. Lloyd brings it back via an emotional blues, but his tenor moves through its registers picking bits and pieces of the lyric line to meditate upon and explore with Moran. The closer, a reading of Brian Wilson's "God Only Knows" is just gorgeous. Moran's elaboration on the harmony in the intro sets it up outside its known parameters. Lloyd quotes the refrain and then takes the lyric line, exploring time and memory -- Lloyd ran around with the Beach Boys in Southern California in the late '60s. Satisfied, he turns it over to Moran to finish with a close, tender harmonic statement that whispers to a finish. Hagar's Song finds Lloyd and Moran at their most naturally curious and deeply attentive best, offering a conversation so intimate the listener may occasionally feel she is eavesdropping. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 28 augustus 2000 | ECM

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Verschenen op 28 februari 2020 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 4F de Télérama
Saxophonist and composer Charles Lloyd celebrated his 80th birthday in 2018. His wife and manager Dorothy Darr decided to commemorate it with a series of shows that would, in and of themselves, be remarkable celebrations. 8: Kindred Spirits Live at the Libero was cut at the 150-year-old Libero Theater in Santa Barbara on March 15 (his actual birthday). Lloyd was in the company of a stellar band that included longtime drummer Eric Harland, and more recent companions pianist Gerald Clayton, bassist Reuben Rogers, and guitarist Julian Lage. He was joined during the second set by organist Booker T. Jones and Blue Note boss Don Was. The full show was released as an expensive, limited-edition package that included three LPs, two compact discs, and a DVD of the entire performance, along with a whopping 96-page hardcover book and a pair of photo prints. This standard version contains both an audio disc and a DVD (or a pair of LPs) and a visual disc that features the concert’s first set sans guests, but it's quite strong on its own. It opens with Lloyd's biggest "hit," a 20-plus minute version of "Dream Weaver," originally recorded in the mid-'60s. Its first five minutes are spent in warm yet abstract improvisation; Lloyd engages sound more than song. Clayton's ostinato ring & roll prompts Lage to deliver tight arpeggios atop Rogers' modal bass and Harland's intricate cymbal and snare play. At five minutes, Lloyd delivers a mantra-like phrase three times then engages the tune's melody. The band finds it quickly and settles into a simmering, song-like exchange; all players wind through and around one another, taking turns soloing before returning to the lucid groove. "Requiem," issued on Notes from Big Sur in 1992, finds the saxophonist delving deeply into the blues in both the intro and his solo, while Lage delivers a shadowy exercise in post-bop's scalar harmonics. The Mexican folk standard "La Llorona" has been with Lloyd since the beginning, though he didn't cut it in the studio until 2016. The frontline of Clayton (who at times gets his piano to sound like a marimba) and Lage offers a quiet drama and tension like a spell, until Harland sets it all free with his consummate fills and accents. The saxophonist enters at 5:33 and moans through his own lyric statement of the theme, adding whispers and wails, and turning it into an emotional watershed, especially when he quotes form "'Round Midnight." The closer, "Part 5: Ruminations," is a relatively new tune. Its early minutes are spent in improvisation, with Lloyd touching on mentors Coltrane, Rollins, Ben Webster, and Coleman Hawkins before Lage and Clayton push into the melody and swing it as Rogers states the groove. There are duo improvs between Lloyd and Lage (the latter's solo is magnificent), the guitarist and Clayton; Harland and Lloyd; Rogers and Lloyd, etc. At over 18 minutes, it is at once exploratory and accessible. This edition comes with its own 40-page hardbound book of photos that include stirring moments of now-absent figures from Lloyd's long life: pianist Michel Petrucciani, guitarist John Abercrombie, and drummer Billy Higgins. Arguably, this edition of 8: Kindred Spirits, though only a first set, is one of Lloyd's strongest live offerings to date. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 11 maart 2008 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Verschenen op 17 mei 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Verschenen op 26 februari 2013 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
Hagar's Song is a deeply intimate, intuitive offering from saxophonist Charles Lloyd and pianist Jason Moran, who has been a key part of Lloyd's quartet since 2007. The program is a collection of standards and originals, as well as one thorny, angular free improvisation ("Pictogram"). The title piece is a five-part suite dedicated to the memory of Lloyd's great-great grandmother, who spent most of her life as a slave. Its various sections reflect the harshness of that life, as well as moments of hope and determination. This work is not always "comfortable" to listen to, and it's not meant to be, but it is musically rich and emotionally taut. Lloyd has always celebrated his deep love of jazz and pop traditions, and those are in abundance here. The near-symbiotic dialogue the pair share on Billy Strayhorn's "Pretty Girl" and George Gershwin's "Bess You Is My Woman Now" offers both dialogic imagination as well as deep listening. (On the latter, Lloyd reveals how supple his tonal reach remains on the tenor as he nears 75; he sweeps from its middle register to something closer to the alto's.) The swinging read of "Mood Indigo" commences conventionally, but Moran's deft, blues-drenched, physical stride lends an urgency to the conversation. Likewise his punchy approach on Earl Hines' "Rosetta," where Lloyd takes the melody and opens up its joy vein, while Moran pumps it with rhythmic and lyric invention courtesy of his amazing left hand. Lloyd's love of rock and pop has its place here, too. On Bob Dylan's ballad "I Shall Be Released," Moran begins with a single repeating note, then a lone chord, as Lloyd tentatively states the melody. But by the second verse, he's quoting from Leon Russell's "A Song for You," as Moran moves its harmonic base to the modal. Lloyd brings it back via an emotional blues, but his tenor moves through its registers picking bits and pieces of the lyric line to meditate upon and explore with Moran. The closer, a reading of Brian Wilson's "God Only Knows" is just gorgeous. Moran's elaboration on the harmony in the intro sets it up outside its known parameters. Lloyd quotes the refrain and then takes the lyric line, exploring time and memory -- Lloyd ran around with the Beach Boys in Southern California in the late '60s. Satisfied, he turns it over to Moran to finish with a close, tender harmonic statement that whispers to a finish. Hagar's Song finds Lloyd and Moran at their most naturally curious and deeply attentive best, offering a conversation so intimate the listener may occasionally feel she is eavesdropping. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 13 april 2015 | Blue Note (BLU)

Onderscheidingen 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Wild Man Dance marks Charles Lloyd's return to Blue Note after nearly 30 years. The work, a six-part suite, was commissioned by the Jazztopad Festival in Wrocĺaw, Poland in 2013 and premiered and was recorded there. The composer is accompanied by an international cast. The American rhythm section -- pianist Gerald Clayton, bassist Joe Sanders, and longtime drummer Eric Harland -- are appended by Greek lyra player Sokratis Sinopoulos and Hungarian Miklos Lukacs on cimbalom. The music here seamlessly melds creative, modally influenced jazz and folk forms, a near classical sense of dynamics, and adventurous improvisation. The long opener "Flying Over the Odra Valley" opens with mysterious interplay between cimbalom and lyra before the bass, drum, and Clayton's elliptical piano enter in a collective rhythmic improvisation on folk drones. Lloyd begins his solo a little over three minutes in. He finds a melody from the heart of the droning center and begins to elaborate upon it as the other instruments gradually rise to meet him. Harland's gently rolling tom-toms, kick drum, and whispering cymbals accent Sanders, who takes a woody solo. It is framed by gently dissonant piano chords that erect themselves into a labyrinthine solo flight. When Lloyd re-enters, it is to re-establish the melodic modal center before Sinopoulos takes it out and helps to introduce "Gardner." Throughout the suite, Lloyd juxtaposes jazz with vanguard textures and the ghosts of sounds and musics from antiquity. Clayton introduces "Lark" with a solo that recalls the meditative yet expressive questioning of Olivier Messiaen's bird songs before bowed bass, lyra, and cimbalom lushly illustrate it without sacrificing the tune's spectral quality. "River" contains a gentle intro, which becomes the vehicle for knotty, swinging post-bop, and later, pulsing free group improvisation highlighted by killer playing by Clayton, Harland, and Lukacs. And while the title track closer also begins slowly, with gorgeous Webster-esque ballad playing from Lloyd, it winds out into a kinetic, freewheeling exploration of tone, timbre, and color and a wonderful solo by Sinopoulos. Wild Man Dance is a success on virtually every level. Its vision is vast, but never indulgent; Lloyd's music is relatable and communicative throughout. It spreads farther than ever before to embrace other musical forms without forsaking jazz. Though Wild Man Dance is on Blue Note, it nonetheless reflects the spiritual and aesthetic qualities nurtured during Lloyd's 16-album tenure at Manfred Eicher's ECM, and extends them with musical restlessness and fearless willingness. This inspiring suite is a landmark in an already extensive creative journey that readily embraces the unknown. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Verschenen op 21 oktober 2002 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 26 augustus 2011 | ECM

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Bebop - Verschenen op 10 juni 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

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Jazz - Verschenen op 12 februari 1999 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 12 mei 1997 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 4 april 2006 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 5 april 2013 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 februari 1990 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 22 maart 2004 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 3 september 2001 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 4 april 2005 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 1 april 1992 | ECM

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Jazz - Verschenen op 26 augustus 1966 | Columbia - Legacy

Artiest

Charles Lloyd in het magazine
  • Charles Lloyd, still going strong
    Charles Lloyd, still going strong Lyrical, spiritual and free, the live recording of the great American saxophonist's 80th birthday celebration has just been released on Blue Note...
  • ECM turns 50!
    ECM turns 50! Manfred Eicher’s Munich-born music label celebrates half a century of jazz different from the norms, bringing the traditionally African-American genre to Europe and beyond…