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Rock - Verschenen op 25 augustus 1975 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 2 juni 1978 | Columbia

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Rock - Verschenen op 20 september 1982 | Columbia

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
There is an adage in the record business that a recording artist's demos of new songs often come off better than the more polished versions later worked up in a studio. But Bruce Springsteen was the first person to act on that theory, when he opted to release the demo versions of his latest songs, recorded with only acoustic or electric guitar, harmonica, and vocals, as his sixth album, Nebraska. It was really the content that dictated the approach, however. Nebraska's ten songs marked a departure for Springsteen, even as they took him farther down a road he'd already been traveling. Gradually, his songs became darker and more pessimistic, and those on Nebraska marked a new low. They also found him branching out into better developed stories. The title track was a first-person account of the killing spree of mass murderer Charlie Starkweather. (It can't have been coincidental that the same story was told in director Terrence Malick's 1973 film Badlands, also used as a Springsteen song title.) That song set the tone for a series of portraits of small-time criminals, desperate people, and those who loved them. Just as the recordings were unpolished, the songs themselves didn't seem quite finished; sometimes the same line turned up in two songs. But that only served to unify the album. Within the difficult times, however, there was hope, especially as the album went on. "Open All Night" was a Chuck Berry-style rocker, and the album closed with "Reason to Believe," a song whose hard-luck verses were belied by the chorus -- even if the singer couldn't understand what it was, "people find some reason to believe." Still, Nebraska was one of the most challenging albums ever released by a major star on a major record label. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 9 november 1973 | Columbia

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Rock - Verschenen op 20 september 1982 | Columbia

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography
There is an adage in the record business that a recording artist's demos of new songs often come off better than the more polished versions later worked up in a studio. But Bruce Springsteen was the first person to act on that theory, when he opted to release the demo versions of his latest songs, recorded with only acoustic or electric guitar, harmonica, and vocals, as his sixth album, Nebraska. It was really the content that dictated the approach, however. Nebraska's ten songs marked a departure for Springsteen, even as they took him farther down a road he'd already been traveling. Gradually, his songs became darker and more pessimistic, and those on Nebraska marked a new low. They also found him branching out into better developed stories. The title track was a first-person account of the killing spree of mass murderer Charlie Starkweather. (It can't have been coincidental that the same story was told in director Terrence Malick's 1973 film Badlands, also used as a Springsteen song title.) That song set the tone for a series of portraits of small-time criminals, desperate people, and those who loved them. Just as the recordings were unpolished, the songs themselves didn't seem quite finished; sometimes the same line turned up in two songs. But that only served to unify the album. Within the difficult times, however, there was hope, especially as the album went on. "Open All Night" was a Chuck Berry-style rocker, and the album closed with "Reason to Believe," a song whose hard-luck verses were belied by the chorus -- even if the singer couldn't understand what it was, "people find some reason to believe." Still, Nebraska was one of the most challenging albums ever released by a major star on a major record label. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Rock - Verschenen op 30 juli 2002 | Columbia

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Rock - Verschenen op 5 januari 1973 | Columbia

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Rock - Verschenen op 31 maart 1992 | Columbia

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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 16 november 2010 | Columbia

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Sélection Les Inrocks
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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 25 april 2006 | Columbia

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Rock - Verschenen op 31 maart 1992 | Columbia

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Rock - Verschenen op 6 maart 2012 | Columbia

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Sélection Les Inrocks
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Pop/Rock - Verschenen op 27 januari 2009 | Columbia

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Rock - Verschenen op 22 april 2014 | Columbia

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Rock - Verschenen op 23 oktober 2020 | Columbia

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The arc of creative genius is predictable. In popular music, the simple answer is no one writes great songs forever. Success tends to dull raging emotions and satiate once endless hunger. In popular music few outside the Beatles can claim a run of success like that of Bruce Springsteen. From 1973's Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J. to 1987's Tunnel of Love, The Boss wrote album after album's worth of truly great songs. His muse returned on 1995's acoustic The Ghost of Tom Joad and 2002's 9/11 influenced triumph The Rising but has been sporadic ever since. Always a searcher, Springsteen has now been re-energized as a songwriter by the twin calamities of loss and mortality. Letter To You, his 20th album, bears the impact not only of Clarence Clemons' passing but also the recent revelation that he is now the last man alive from his first band, The Castiles. The man who once launched himself off PA towers with wild abandon, proclaiming his stone desire, has become a 71-year-old who's finally played the ace card he's had all along: a return to the studio with the E Street Band. Recorded live with the band at his Stone Hill Studio near his New Jersey home, Letter To You—unlike marathon Springsteen sessions from the past—was tracked in a mere five days. The sound is not the crisp digital world of his solo projects but the full-bodied band sound chock-full of guitar chords, organs, glockenspiels, harmonicas, Roy Bittan's piano and the welcome pounding of the mighty Max Weinberg. Clarence's nephew Jake Clemons provides ghostly echoes of his uncle's horn. After opening with the acoustic solo number "One Minute You're Here" with the singer laying his penny down on the tracks, the E Street vibe floods in on the title track. The acoustic piano-led "House of a Thousand Guitars," speaks for "good souls near and far," while "Rainmaker" hints at politics where "folks need to believe in something so bad." Three old songs written in the '70s anchor the album. "Janey Needs a Shooter," written for Darkness on the Edge of Town and later loosely covered by Warren Zevon, has long been one of the strongest Bruce outtakes. He reaches back further, all the way to Greetings, for "If I Was the Priest," and "Song for Orphans." Both are solid and Dylanesque, filled with the dense often jabberwocky wordplay of his long-ago debut. Once exhilarating signs that a great talent was rising, these songs now indicate that after exploring many artistic sideroads, that same virtuoso has taken a step forward by returning to his roots. © Robert Baird/Qobuz
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Rock - Verschenen op 4 juni 1984 | Columbia

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In 1982, The Boss amazed everyone with Nebraska. Leaving his powerful rock’n’roll band (the E Street Band) to one side, Springsteen went in the opposite direction; much to everyone's surprise, he released a masterpiece of all-acoustic purity, crafted from a guitar and a harmonica... How would he follow this album up two years later? By bringing out the heavy artillery! Leaving his acoustic guitar and cheap magneto in the basement, The Boss and his E Street Band returned with a bang: lumberjack drums, howling saxophones, bulging guitars and stadium anthems galore. Springsteen found his calling as a spokesman for the marginalised. Tackling themes such as unemployment, poverty, the aftermath of Vietnam and general doom and gloom, the electric poet from New Jersey made new sparks fly with his no-frills rock'n'roll, his relentless melodies and his choruses that packed a punch. There’s nothing chauvinistic on Born In The USA (what a title… and what an album cover!), just a deep instinct to be the voice for the marginalised masses, the neglected proletarians, all the people who make up the starred banner; even when it is rather wrinkled... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Verschenen op 14 juni 2019 | Columbia

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A few months before his 70th birthday, the Boss has released an album that’s totally out of step with his usual sound. Bye-bye to the E Street Band, his loyal backing band that gets entire stadiums up and dancing, and hello strings, brass and choirs! With Western Stars, Bruce Springsteen transforms himself into a kind of third millennium Glen Campbell. In fact, the singer who died in 2017 often comes to mind; building bridges between pop, country and soul with a voice as iconic as that of Sinatra or Elvis, Campbell topped the charts with hits like Gentle on My Mind, By the Time I Get to Phoenix, Wichita Lineman, Galveston, Rhinestone Cowboy.Much like his deceased elder, Springsteen detaches himself from the present and comes across as innocent and nonchalant rather than resistant or distrustful. In addition to a kitsch atmosphere that harkens back to California of the late sixties/early seventies (the Boss has clearly been playing Jimmy Webb, Harry Nilsson and Burt Bacharach on loop), we find an almost cinematic feel thanks to Ron Aniello's silky production. He’s not new to the job, having already worked with Springsteen on Wrecking Ball (2012) and High Hopes (2014). Here, Springsteen moves away from pure rock’n’roll and drenches his songs in melancholy. Western Stars is not just a compilation of thirteen tracks. It feels more like a novel or a film - one that you could watch over and over again and still find something new every time. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Rock - Verschenen op 16 oktober 2015 | Columbia - Legacy

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Rock - Verschenen op 17 oktober 1980 | Columbia

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Rock - Verschenen op 27 februari 1995 | Columbia - Legacy

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Artiest

Bruce Springsteen in het magazine
  • Bruce has still got it!
    Bruce has still got it! The arc of creative genius is predictable. In popular music, the simple answer is no one writes great songs forever. Success tends to dull raging emotions and satiate once endless hunger. In popula...