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Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2001 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Qobuz Referentie
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Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 1 januari 1978 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Onderscheidingen The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Qobuz Referentie
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Reggae - Verschenen op 8 mei 1984 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Ideal Audio Discography
Dit is het klassieke Bob Marley-album, die ene die alle mooiweer-reggaefans in de kast hebben staan. Legend bevat 14 van zijn beste nummers, het hele spectrum van "I Shot the Sherrif" tot het meditatieve "Redemption Song" en het niet te versmaden "Three Little Birds". Sommigen zouden kunnen zeggen dat de compilatie geen recht doet aan zijn eerdere, baanbrekende ska-werk of zijn status als politiek commentator, maar dit album is niet bedoeld als onherroepelijke verzameling, het is slechts een introductie tot zijn beste werk. En daarin slaagt het uitstekend: het biedt al zijn genreoverstijgende nummers en illustreert zijn excellerende, warme menselijkheid. De schoonheid en simpelheid van Marleys muziek was net zo belangrijk als zijn boodschap en beiden zijn op deze plaat gevangen. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Reggae - Verschenen op 1 januari 1978 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Hi-Res Audio
The second half of the 1970s was a prolific era for Bob Marley, at the peak of his glory days, during which he was releasing an album a year. After Rastaman Vibration in 1976, Exodus in 1977, the Jamaican artist released this Kaya in 1978, with tracks originating from the same session as Exodus, recorded during the first few months of his exile in London, in early 1977. The album is widely considered as his lightest, no doubt because of its theme, as Kaya means marijuana in Jamaican slang. The album starts off with Easy Skanking’s“Excuse me while I light my spliff”, as if Marley was totally at ease with the B-side nature of these songs. But it would be a mistake to underestimate the hit machines that were the Wailers, as this album features two of their discography’s biggest successes, Is This Love and Satisfy My Soul – certified double platinum in France and gold disc in the USA. Bob Marley also used these sessions to revisit his Lee Perry period, first with the title song Kaya, for which he wrote a chiselled version without Scratch’s wacky flamenco guitar, like a symbol of Island’s influence – some would say to the detriment of romanticism… –, while Sun Is Shining, more ethereal than its original, rose to new heights and spiciness with Junior Marvin’s electric guitar. On the B-side at the time, one could find She’s Gone, a song about an ousted lover, Crisis, which sounds like a spin-off born out of a rehearsal for Is This Love, or the “rastaman chant” Time Will Tell, cadenced by Nyabinghi drumming. The album ends in a deadpan way with Smile Jamaica, a title composed for its namesake concert on December 5th, 1976 at the National Heroes Park in Kingston, Jamaica, in which Bob Marley took part two days after being shot… © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Reggae - Verschenen op 1 januari 2001 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2001 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Reggae - Verschenen op 1 januari 2001 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2001 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2002 | Tuff Gong

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Reggae - Verschenen op 1 januari 2001 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Reggae - Verschenen op 1 januari 2013 | Tuff Gong

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
The second half of the 1970s was a prolific era for Bob Marley, at the peak of his glory days, during which he was releasing an album a year. After Rastaman Vibration in 1976, Exodus in 1977, the Jamaican artist released this Kaya in 1978, with tracks originating from the same session as Exodus, recorded during the first few months of his exile in London, in early 1977. The album is widely considered as his lightest, no doubt because of its theme, as Kaya means marijuana in Jamaican slang. The album starts off with Easy Skanking’s “Excuse me while I light my spliff”, as if Marley was totally at ease with the B-side nature of these songs. But it would be a mistake to underestimate the hit machines that were the Wailers, as this album features two of their discography’s biggest successes, Is This Love and Satisfy My Soul – certified double platinum in France and gold disc in the USA. Bob Marley also used these sessions to revisit his Lee Perry period, first with the title song Kaya, for which he wrote a chiselled version without Scratch’s wacky flamenco guitar, like a symbol of Island’s influence – some would say to the detriment of romanticism… –, while Sun Is Shining, more ethereal than its original, rose to new heights and spiciness with Junior Marvin’s electric guitar. On the B-side at the time, one could find She’s Gone, a song about an ousted lover, Crisis, which sounds like a spin-off born out of a rehearsal for Is This Love, or the “rastaman chant” Time Will Tell, cadenced by Nyabinghi drumming. The album ends in a deadpan way with Smile Jamaica, a title composed for its namesake concert on December 5th, 1976 at the National Heroes Park in Kingston, Jamaica, in which Bob Marley took part two days after being shot… © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2002 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Wereldmuziek - Verschenen op 1 januari 2002 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Reggae - Verschenen op 1 januari 1978 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
The second half of the 1970s was a prolific era for Bob Marley, at the peak of his glory days, during which he was releasing an album a year. After Rastaman Vibration in 1976, Exodus in 1977, the Jamaican artist released this Kaya in 1978, with tracks originating from the same session as Exodus, recorded during the first few months of his exile in London, in early 1977. The album is widely considered as his lightest, no doubt because of its theme, as Kaya means marijuana in Jamaican slang. The album starts off with Easy Skanking’s “Excuse me while I light my spliff”, as if Marley was totally at ease with the B-side nature of these songs. But it would be a mistake to underestimate the hit machines that were the Wailers, as this album features two of their discography’s biggest successes, Is This Love and Satisfy My Soul – certified double platinum in France and gold disc in the USA. Bob Marley also used these sessions to revisit his Lee Perry period, first with the title song Kaya, for which he wrote a chiselled version without Scratch’s wacky flamenco guitar, like a symbol of Island’s influence – some would say to the detriment of romanticism… –, while Sun Is Shining, more ethereal than its original, rose to new heights and spiciness with Junior Marvin’s electric guitar. On the B-side at the time, one could find She’s Gone, a song about an ousted lover, Crisis, which sounds like a spin-off born out of a rehearsal for Is This Love, or the “rastaman chant” Time Will Tell, cadenced by Nyabinghi drumming. The album ends in a deadpan way with Smile Jamaica, a title composed for its namesake concert on December 5th, 1976 at the National Heroes Park in Kingston, Jamaica, in which Bob Marley took part two days after being shot… © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Reggae - Verschenen op 1 januari 2012 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Onderscheidingen Qobuz Referentie
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Reggae - Verschenen op 3 juni 1977 | Tuff Gong

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After the success of 1974's Natty Dread and 1976's Rastaman Vibration, Bob Marley was not only the most successful reggae musician in the world, he was one of the most powerful men in Jamaica. Powerful enough, in fact, that he was shot by gunmen who broke into his home in December 1976, days before he was to play a massive free concert intended to ease tensions days before a contentious election for Jamaican Prime Minister. In the wake of the assassination attempt, Marley and his band left Jamaica and settled in London for two years, where he recorded 1977's Exodus. Thematically, Exodus represented a subtle but significant shift for Marley; while he continued to speak out against political corruption and for freedom and equality for Third World people, his lyrics dealt less with specifics and more with generalities and the need for peace and love (though "So Much Things to Say," "Guiltiness," and "The Heathen" demonstrate the bullets had taken only so much sting out of Marley's lyrics). And while songs like "Exodus" and "One Love/People Get Ready" were anthemic, they also had less to say than the more pointed material from Marley's earlier albums. However, if Marley had become more wary in his point of view (and not without good cause), his skill as a songwriter was as strong as ever, and Exodus boasted more than a few classics, including the title song, "Three Little Birds," "Waiting in Vain," and "Turn Your Lights Down Low," tunes that defined Marley's gift for sounding laid-back and incisive at once. His gifts as a vocalist were near their peak on these sessions, bringing a broad range of emotional color to his performances, and this lineup of the Wailers -- anchored by bassist Aston "Family Man" Barrett, drummer Carlton Barrett, and guitarist Julian "Junior" Murvin -- is superb, effortlessly in the pocket throughout. Exodus was recorded at a time when Bob Marley was learning about the unexpected costs of international stardom, but it hadn't yet sapped his creative strengths, and this is one of the finest albums in his stellar catalog. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Reggae - Verschenen op 1 januari 2007 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Reggae - Verschenen op 1 januari 2013 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

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Reggae - Verschenen op 12 juni 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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1977 was the year that Bob Marley became a superstar, but it was also the year that marked the beginning of the end. In January, Bob was exiled to London after being shot in Jamaica and recorded his new album, Exodus, in the Island studios. Packed with hits (One Love, Jamming, Three Little Birds, to name but a few), the album received universal acclaim after its release – its title track became No. 1 in England and Germany – and finally got him noticed by black American music stations. On 10th May 1977, the Wailers kicked off their international tour in Paris. During their stay in the French capital, Bob injured his foot and as the wound worsened, it was revealed that he had skin cancer. The tour was cut short, ending abruptly in London with four shows at the Rainbow Theatre.The performance on June 4th, which was also captured on video, has now been re-released on this album. Bob Marley is joined on stage by his legendary rhythm section composed of Carlton and Aston Barrett (drums and bass), Tyrone Downie on keyboards, Alvin “Seeco” Patterson on percussion, Junior Marvin – who turned down an offer from Stevie Wonder to join the Jamaican – on guitar, and the I Threes on backing vocals. The tracklist is an extravaganza of his greatest hits (Trenchtown Rock, I Shot the Sheriff, No Woman No Cry and Lively Up Yourself, featuring a deeply soulful blues solo by Marvin). Also included are three excerpts from their newest album, The Heathen, Jamming and finally, Exodus for a frenetic finale expertly led by Tyrone Downie. A beautiful piece of history. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Reggae - Verschenen op 3 september 2021 | Mercury Studios

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In America in 1973, unless you were a serious music obsessive, chances were good you were not familiar with reggae music and hadn't heard of Bob Marley & the Wailers. That said, the critical acclaim that greeted their first two albums for Island Records, Catch a Fire and Burnin', and the buzz generated by their first U.S. tour was starting to change that. Producer Denny Cordell was ahead of the curve; he was a fan after hearing Marley's early Jamaican releases, and his label Shelter Records gave the Wailers their first American release, a single of their Lee "Scratch" Perry-produced classic "Duppy Conqueror" in 1971 (though the label misspelled it "Doppy Conqueror"). When the Wailers were wrapping up an American tour in October 1973 with a pair of concerts in San Francisco, Cordell invited them to play a private show in Los Angeles, booking the Capitol Records recording studio, bringing in a camera crew to videotape the set, and inviting friends and fans to cheer on the band. The Capitol Session '73 gives this performance its first authorized release after the long-lost tapes were rediscovered. It also captures the Wailers in a unique moment: Bunny Wailer had quit, and Joe Higgs, who had mentored the Wailers in their early days, joined the tour to fill his spot in the harmonies. And though Peter Tosh was still on board, within months he'd leave to go solo. The Capitol Session '73 preserves an evening where the original Wailers fading out and Marley's era as unquestioned leader would soon begin, and one of the things most striking about this material is how strong the Wailers were as a band. Marley clearly had the voice and the charisma to be a frontman, but here he's fully integrated with the other musicians, and the vocal spots from Tosh bring a welcome contrast, with Tosh's ominous cool complementing Marley's warmth and passion. Tosh's guitar work is equally strong here, and Earl "Wire" Lindo's keyboards support the melodies while turning up the tension. The peerless rhythm section of Aston "Family Man" Barrett and his brother Carlton Barrett is a model of sinewy, efficient groove, and while it takes a few songs for the band to fully hit their mark, by the time they swing into "Burnin' and Lootin'" and "Midnight Ravers," they sound unstoppable, and the finale of "Get Up, Stand Up" tells you all you need to know about why this band became legendary. The set list is also a welcome corrective to the overly simplified image of Marley as a ganga-fortified merchant of sunny vibes; despite the veneer of Rasta calm, this is music of protest, and all the more powerful for its rebellious heart. While 1975's Live! remains the definitive document of Marley on-stage, The Capitol Session '73 is a welcome reminder of the joyous power of the Wailers, not just Marley, and it's a valuable addition to their catalog. © Mark Deming /TiVo