Albums

818444 albums gesorteerd op Price: from most expensive to least expensive en gefilterd op Pop/Rock
€ 304,99

Rock - Verschenen op 10 januari 2014 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

€ 284,99
€ 247,49

Pop - Verschenen op 7 juni 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res
€ 192,49

Pop - Verschenen op 30 oktober 2006 | WM France

€ 167,99

Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2010 | EMI Catalogue

Booklet
€ 187,49
€ 162,49

Rock - Verschenen op 17 december 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res
€ 162,49

Pop - Verschenen op 26 februari 2016 | Rhino

€ 202,49
€ 177,49

Pop - Verschenen op 1 juli 2014 | Rhino

Hi-Res
€ 162,49

Pop - Verschenen op 4 juli 2011 | WM Sweden

€ 162,49

Rock - Verschenen op 1 april 2017 | Albert Productions

€ 147,49

Rock - Verschenen op 29 mei 2009 | Reprise

€ 172,49
€ 147,49

Pop - Verschenen op 7 oktober 2016 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

Hi-Res
€ 147,49

Progressieve rock - Verschenen op 11 november 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

€ 139,99

Metal - Verschenen op 2 november 2018 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

As if coming up with a worthy successor to the incomparable monument Masters Of Puppets wasn't daunting enough, Metallica had to go through the loss of Cliff Burton, who was more than just a bassist: he was a kind of spiritual and musical guide. Although they would later call on the services of a psychiatrist (see the film Some Kind Of Monster), it was when they started work on this fourth album that Lars Ulrich, James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett really needed the services of a shrink. Poor old Jason Newsted probably could have done with some help as well, coming to terms with becoming the group's whipping boy, especially on this album where he was simply "eliminated" from the mix. Although Lars and James swore that they'd never remix the bass back into ...AJFA it's clearly much more present on this remastery and on the numerous live tracks that feature on this re-release. Consciously or not, the three survivors of the tour bus accident that killed Cliff on 27 September 1986 were trying to record an album that the he would have liked. With Cliff, the group's horizons had widened, and they had become a sophisticated band whose tastes ran from Bach to the high-flying prog rock of Rush, King Crimson or Yes, from the bluesy hard rock of Thin Lizzy to the southern rock of Lynyrd Skynyrd or Allman Brothers… It's clear that Lars and James took Metallica forward in this period, but they pushed their convoluted compositions to their outer limit, with the result being that …AJFA feels like a gigantic cabinet with countless compartments and drawers. Throughout the development period of the nine tracks on this double album (which dates from the last halcyon days of vinyl), things were never easy for Kirk or Jason, which is made clear by the many offcuts and first drafts included in this re-release (running from James's first audio cassettes in 1986 all the way through to the sessions with the whole band from October 1987 to January  1988). While Cliff's shadow hangs over this album, which is surely Metallica's most "progressive" album, the group was soon to take a turn in another direction. After all, it would have been hard for them to go much further into experimental madness. The paradox is that …AJFA brought the four-piece their first "mainstream" success with One. The the cut-down version made it onto the airwaves and MTV thanks to Metallica's first ever music video. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
€ 139,99

Metal - Verschenen op 10 november 2017 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Onderscheidingen Best New Reissue
Metallica, a band stronger than The Beatles? Without a doubt if you consider sound power, but in terms of remastered editions featuring “a few” bonuses, the award might also go to the Four Horsemen if you compare the “Deluxe” edition of their third album to the Fab Four’s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band Anniversary (Super Deluxe Edition). In it, you’ll find the equivalent of no less than ten fully-packed CDs for this Master Of Puppets that many consider, rightly or wrongly, as Metallica’s own Sgt. Pepper's. Well, it’s true that you’ll struggle finding any defect in the armour of such a monument. And its lengthy gestation period, highlighted through archives at various stages of development, will no doubt reinforce the belief that the band was touched by grace at this very moment in their history. A few rare critics begrudge this album for not having been as surprising as its two predecessors. Indeed the general structure of Master… , as well as the majority of its titles, can be compared with Ride The Lightning from the first frantic title Battery, in the same vein as Fight Fire With Fire, to the epic final of Damage Inc., wildly evoking a sped-up version of Creeping Death. There is also a false ballad halfway through, Welcome Home (Sanitarium), reusing in essence the same ingredients as Fade To Black and the finely chopped instrumental of Orion, with a very vague similarity with The Call Of Ktulu… However while this third attempt can be seen as a synthesis of the previous two, Master… is by far the most accomplished in the sense that, for the first time, Metallica had the time and means to refine and polish their compositions to the point of almost perfection. Even when compared with recent productions, the album is technically inevitable and unrivalled. In detail, the value of this remastered edition is not so much the lifting done to the original work, but rather everything else around it. Ever since Metallica’s first official live album Live Shit: Binge & Purge, we’ve been used to them not doing things halfway. But this goes beyond everything you could have imagined, even when compared with the remastered versions of Kill 'em All and Ride The Lightning. The band emptied all their drawers and sorted them out to enrich the album − in every sense of the word. First and foremost you’ll be delighted with the numerous drafts, which can certainly be recommended to aspiring musicians. The same applies to demoes, at different levels of development, and instrumental versions, which reveal numerous hidden details. You’ll probably not listen to James (and his “wananananas”) and Kirk’s personal tapes or the “writing in progress” versions recorded in Metallica’s famous “garage” over and over again, but the two highlights of these archives − The Prince, in a quite accomplished first approach to the title borrowed from Diamond Head, and the cover of Fang’s The Money Will Roll Right In, which was abandoned on the way – are both worth several listens. The colossal album only brings division among fans when discussing its ranking among Metallica’s best albums − although it would always make the podium. The new approach offered here might sway a few more votes for the first position. But beyond a well deserved and convincing highlight of the quality of Master…, this album is also the undeniable accomplishment of the Cliff Burton era. An easily discernable period in the sense that the bass was beautifully put forward. And for good reason! Far from being a simple bass player, Cliff was both a driving force in terms of creativity and inspiration as and a generous and calm character, balancing and “harmonising” the relations within Metallica. As we’ll see later, his mediating role would have more than once been useful between Lars Ulrich and James Hetfield. Some even wonder if Kirk Hammett didn’t just stop getting better after this album, without Cliff’s mental and instrumental boosts. The bass player’s role is obvious in the concerts featured in this edition with, for some of them, an exceptional sound quality. It’s also worth noting that Cliff’s very last concert is featured in this edition, at Stockholm’s Solnahallen on September 26th, 1986, a few hours before the tour bus accident that claimed his life. In this instance no one will complain about the “bootleg” quality of the recording. No matter what Jason Newsted – whose auditions and first concert with Metallica are included – brought to the table, it’s clear the band lost much more than a simple musician with Cliff Burton. The main argument of those who place Master… at the top of their ranking is precisely what …And Justice For All and the “Black Album” (Metallica) are missing: Cliff Burton, period! With the great care given to this remastered version of Master…, it is obvious that Lars, James and Kirk wanted to pay tribute to the one who brought them so much. © JPS/Qobuz
€ 139,99

Rock - Verschenen op 20 oktober 2017 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet
Each year, fans of Frank Zappa didn’t celebrate Halloween like any other Americans. No. Before passing away at only 52 on December 4, 1993, their idol had developed the habit of offering relentless marathon concerts. First scheduled in Passaic, New Jersey then in Chicago, they took place in New York starting from 1974. From 28th to 31st October, 1977, in the Palladium hall, Zappa and his wacky band gave six concerts that have made history. Everything has of course be recorded and four of these shows have even been filmed (Baby Snakes). To celebrate the fortieth birthday of this great event unlike any other, the entirety of this party has finally been published. 158 remastered tracks, and more than 15 hours of music! Alongside Zappa, the faithful Terry Bozzio (drums), Tommy Mars and Peter Wolf (keyboards), Adrian Belew (guitar), Ed Mann (percussion) and Patrick O’Hearn (bass) are there to cover an almost eleven-year career and dig in albums as emblematic as Hot Rats, Over-Nite Sensation, Bongo Fury, One Size Fits All or even Zoot Allures. © CM/Qobuz
€ 139,99

Alternative en Indie - Verschenen op 16 november 2017 | Frank Zappa Catalog

Booklet
€ 139,99

Rock - Verschenen op 1 januari 2009 | Virgin EMI

€ 147,49
€ 127,49

Pop - Verschenen op 30 april 2013 | Rhino - Elektra

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Hi-Res Audio
€ 147,49
€ 127,49

Pop - Verschenen op 7 mei 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
€ 127,49

Pop - Verschenen op 5 december 2018 | WM Japan