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Klassiek - Verschenen op 28 februari 2020 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
Jean-Efflam Bavouzet’s acclaimed series of piano concertos by Mozart reaches its fifth instalment. Concertos Nos. 5, 6, 8, and 9 are complemented by the overtures to Il sogno di Scipione, Lucio Silla, La finta giardiniera, Il re pastore, and Zaide. That all of these works were composed by Mozart between the ages of fifteen and twenty-five serves as a vivid reminder of his unique talents as a child prodigy: these are not childhood efforts but mature works. The Fifth Concerto was actually Mozart’s first, as Nos 1 – 4 are arrangements of works by other composers. As in the previous volumes, Bavouzet is partnered by Manchester Camerata and Gábor Takács-Nagy, all recorded in The Stoller Hall in Manchester. © Chandos
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 november 2019 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
As one of the finest pianists of his era and an improviser of genius, Ludwig van Beethoven’s preferred vehicle for musical exploration was the piano. His earliest composition, from 1782, was a set of piano variations and he continued to compose for solo piano until the last years of his life. His interest in the concerto form diminished as his deafness forced him to retire from performing. Nonetheless, with his five piano concertos composed between 1788 and 1809, Beethoven not only achieved a brilliant conclusion to the Classical piano concerto, but also established a new model for the Romantic era: a sort of symphony with obbligato piano which remained a reference point well into the beginning of the twentieth. Ronald Brautigam has already recorded these seminal works with the Norrköping Symphony Orchestra, in acclaimed performances released between 2008 and 2010. Since then he has also released all of Beethoven’s solo piano music on the fortepiano to universal praise. When Brautigam now returns to the concertos, it is in the company of conductor Michael Alexander Willens and Die Kölner Akademie playing on period instruments. The same team has previously partnered him in an 11-disc survey of Mozart’s piano concertos and it is plain to hear that all involved clearly relish the opportunity to congratulate Beethoven on the eve of his 250th anniversary. © BIS Records
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 30 augustus 2019 | Fanfare Cincinnati

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 15 november 2019 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
Composed three centuries ago, Johann Sebastian Bach’s set of six works for solo violin stands as one of the holy grails of the instrument’s literature – perhaps the holiest. Now the great Austrian musician Thomas Zehetmair makes his own mark in the rich history of this music, revisiting the repertoire on period instruments. Zehetmair is an extraordinary violinist and a consistently inquisitive and self-questioning artist. He has not only played the big concertos but has given close attention to chamber music and new repertory, and has also found an extra calling as a conductor, channeling this varied experience into his return to the formidable cornerstone of Bach’s solo masterpieces. As a young man Zehetmair worked with Nikolaus Harnoncourt in his period ensemble, working with him to prepare for his first recording of the sonatas and partitas on a modern instrument. For this new recording, he draws out exquisite colours from two violins from Bach’s lifetime, both of them by masters in the German tradition, but there is nothing antiquarian in his approach – old instruments, for him, are tools with which to express a modern sensibility: alert, edgy, multivalent. His performance engages, too, with the superb acoustic of the priory church of St Gerold, in Austria where so many legendary ECM recordings have been made. Peter Gülke, in his accompanying essay, refers to the “floating spirituality” of this music, and to how Bach here offers one side of a conversation with the performer, whom he leaves free to determine matters of dynamic shading, phrasing and bowing. Zehetmair brings vividness and intelligence to the conversation on a recording that, deeply steeped in the music and true, is at the same time powerfully original. © ECM New Series
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 10 januari 2020 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
It has been a long time, and probably stretching all the way back to the now-distant, legendary concerts led by Carlos Kleiber in 1989 and 1992, since we have enjoyed a New Year's Concert of such quality. With the Latvian Andris Nelsons (known and liked by the Philharmoniker) conducting, this first concert of 2020 had a fluent elegance, a rhythmical verve which was both light and implacable, and a kind of song that allowed the Viennese strings to show off their incredibly silky texture and profound depth. Andris Nelsons is clearly very much at ease with this repertoire, and brings a very refined approach to this novel programme. Hits sit alongside lesser-known pieces, including Beethoven's Contredanses kicking off the German’s anniversary year with a bang. Nelson gleefully swaps his baton for a trumpet, his favourite instrument, and gets stuck into the Postillon Galop by the "Danish Johann Strauss", Hans Christian Lumbye. This original programme brings us Knall und Fall, a rapid polka from Eduard Strauss, Cupido, a delightful French (slow) polka by Josef Strauss and Joseph Hellmesberger's Gavotte and some other tasty Viennese treats making it into the New Year's Concert for the first time. The ebullient audience was also very keen to hear some more conventional favourites: and no-one was disappointed by the stunning rendition of the famous Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka, played at a diabolical pace, with phenomenal virtuosity from these Viennese musicians, who remain the unchallenged masters of this repertoire. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 3 april 2020 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 22 november 2019 | Printemps des Arts de Monte-Carlo

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 20 maart 2020 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 27 september 2019 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
Michel Dalberto has had a unique career journey. An expert of French repertoire, exemplified with his tetralogy published on Aparté (Debussy, Fauré, Franck and Ravel), he also recorded the somewhat neglected first sonatas by Beethoven in a compilation published by Erato in the 1980s. However, he thereafter dedicated himself mainly to Schubert, saving the Appassionata, Moonlight and Opus 111 for later. This album signals the end of the wait for these iconic pieces in the year of an important anniversary for Beethoven, presenting them to the listener in chronological order. From the Pathétique to Sonata n°32, op. 111, Michel Dalberto seems determined to portray Beethoven as a classical and not a pre-romantic composer, as the musical history books are often known to do. There is a real emphasis on the thematic and motivic logic of the music here. Thus the deliberately slow tempo of the Allegretto of the Sonata n°14, op. 27 manages to deconstruct the score without totally stripping it of its substance. It’s followed by the Presto Agitato, a delirious sprint with devilish articulation which is divinely transparent despite the apprehension in the highs and lows. The formidable changes in register in Beethoven’s opus are interwoven seamlessly thanks to the narrative genius of the performer (Schubert’s influence is not too far away). Indeed, Opus 111’s first movement is remarkable. The Steinway is expectedly robust, cutting even, as the pianist creates moments of orchestral sonority and weightless playing. A result which leaves the listener awestruck. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 7 februari 2020 | Phi

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
Bach’s St. John Passion, with its famous opening chorus traversed by shadows and light, is a powerful musical and spiritual reflection. Dramatic, grandiose, complex, resolutely theatrical: there has been no lack of superlatives to describe this supreme masterpiece of western music. Philippe Herreweghe and Collegium Vocale Gent present an accomplished reading that reflects their knowledge of the composer, based on extensive research and deepened by countless concerts. Soloists Krešimir Stražanac and Maximilian Schmitt demonstrate the breadth of their talents in the roles of Jesus and the Evangelist. © Phi
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 15 november 2019 | Alpha

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - Qobuzism
The final part of this intelligent and well-rounded triptych certainly deserves a Qobuzissime! It has been several years since we have been following this grandiose but relaxed duo, made up of violinist Lorenzo Gatto and pianist Julien Libeer. The Belgian pair have brought their complete collection of Beethoven’s sonatas for violin and piano to a close. There is a lot of spontaneity in this integral work, yet this freshness is not synonymous with offhandedness. On the contrary, the fruit of a well thought-out project, it unfolds as a thrilling story in three parts.The first volume opened like a stage curtain on this landmark of Beethoven with the iconic Kreutzer sonata, a strong score which trumps the expectations of the genre. The vehement drama of the first movement, slow and in a minor key, contrasts with the gentle nature of the second movement and confirms that the sonata is well and truly a format for two instruments on an equal footing and not just a support act to the piano, a Steinway in this instance.The second one delineated the milestones of an expanding genre. From the first to the last sonata, via the most popular nicknamed Spring, we bear witness to a general amplification of style. From Opus 12 to Opus 96, the form expands, the technical difficulty of playing increases and the light-hearted fun gives way to a more energetic rhetoric. For this second album, the duo chose the lustrous power of Chris Maene’s parallel-stringed piano. The instrument affords the necessary resonance to the interpretation of this sometimes outright zesty, sometimes tenderly subtle score.The third volume frames the Steinway’s radiance (Sonatas 6 and 7) with the more ample Maene piano (Sonatas 3 and 8) and is dedicated to the works conceived when the composer’s hearing began to falter. Paradoxically, this nightmare for Beethoven has brought about a gift for his listeners. Varied combinations of timbres, styles and character are constantly renewed in this cycle which Gatto and Libeer faithfully interpret throughout its entirety. Our award of recognition is also a retrospective on the first two milestones of this adventure which has valiantly held its promise. An important integral work to explore and encourage others to do so as well! © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 13 september 2019 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 18 oktober 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 11 oktober 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
Daniil Trifonov's journey around the world of Rachmaninov is at an end. The pianist has arrived safely into the harbour with Yannick Nézet-Seguin's Philadelphia Orchestra. This finale was inspired by the bells which are ubiquitous in the Great Russian soundscape. Alain Corbin explained their importance to the rhythmic and symbolic scansion of everyday life in 19th Century France in his book Village Bells. To the historian's analysis, we can now add the testimony of the pianist – who, like Rachmaninov, grew up in Novgorod. Russian bells leant Russian music its nobility and colouring of folk nostalgia. Daniil Trifonov hasn't forgotten this, as is clear from his piano transcription of the first episode of Les Cloches. He was wise enough to respect the operatic power of the score and the splendour of its orchestration: harp, celesta and flutes are all truly transformed into bells in the hands of a musician who stays true to the aura of disquieting oddness (with its shades of Edgar Allen Poe) which surrounds the first movement. His technique matches his capricious and bubbling imagination. While we might find ourselves yawning a little at the Vocalise, the first and third Concertos move us from thrilling ecstasies to tears of pleasure. A very fine record, in which the orchestra, perhaps a little distant, fulfils its role as a soundbox for the soloist. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 13 september 2019 | Berlin Classics

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
Céline Moinet is often asked why she decided to become an oboe player. She was adamant: she did not want to play a brass or stringed instrument or even a piano – it had to be woodwind. After having begun, as most children do, with the recorder, she turned at age 7 to the oboe, which had captivated her from the word go. On her new album she takes a look at Johann Sebastian Bach: "Here, the oboe becomes the narrator". Together with the prizewinning instrumental ensemble "l’arte del mondo" under Werner Ehrhardt she combines a historically-informed orchestral sound with her modern Marigaux oboe. The musicians have recorded Bach's three oboe concertos: BWV 1059, 1053r and 1055 as well as the sinfonias to the cantatas Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen and Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis in which the solo oboe is the focus. "Bach's cantatas were my first port of call. They are a rich, sophisticated source of literature for oboists; one might say they are the quintessence of his music", says Moinet. Following on from her last album centred on Schumann's Romances she enters a very different sound world this time round, though not one that is a stranger to her: she heard Alessandro Marcello's Oboe Concerto very early on, the second movement of which Bach ornamented. "I have strong childhood memories of the work". © Berlin Classics
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 7 februari 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
The “discoveries” mentioned in the title of this record are mostly pieces of occasional light music, including a few marches, written by Luigi Cherubini when he was director of the French academy of music in Paris. But the lion’s share of the album conducted by Riccardo Chailly, head of the Filamornica della Scala in Milan, is the Italian composer’s sole symphony commissioned in London as a replacement of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony which could not meet the required deadline. The German composer greatly admired Cherubini. But, unfortunately, Cherubini is not Beethoven and his skillful Symphony in D major, once championed by Arturo Toscanini, cannot bear comparison with Beethoven’s. Maestro Chailly’s performance generates beautiful energy and excitement but the conductor’s effort cannot turn the symphony into a masterpiece. The album is released to celebrate Beethoven’s birthday. It is worth listening to if you want to discover a composer that Beethoven praised and admired. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 18 oktober 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
Don't be fooled: this youthful face belongs to an 18 year old violinist with a wealth of knowledge and a tried-and-tested technique. For proof, just look at his Bach record, which came out before this Tchaikovsky Concerto, also on Deutsche Grammophon. With every new outing, Daniel Lozakovich surrounds himself with famous formations: for Bach, the Bavarian Radio Chamber Orchestra; for Tchaikovsky, the Russian National Philharmonic under Vladimir Spivakov (himself a great violinist who conducted his first recital in 2010). This gutsy concerto is addressed by a musician with an ample, sparkling sound, capable of an intense virtuosity and a very tender melancholy. Alongside Spivakov, who also recorded this score, he is quite at home. The hands-on sound recording seeks out the fullness of lyricism here, without robbing the strings of their bite. Note that the young soloist learned his scales under Eduard Wulfson in Karlsruhe. This student of giants like Henryk Szeryng, Nathan Milstein and Yehudi Menuhin (no less) taught his young disciple the violin of the Russian school.This young artist's voracious curiosity did the rest. And so, the second part of his programme here offers passages where pure melancholy has been distilled into music, as in Lensky's aria from Eugene Onegin, an opera that the violinist adores and knows by heart. His performance is inspired by previous interpretations by Fritz Wunderlich and Ivan Kozlovsky. And no-one could deny it: Daniel Lozakovich's violin sings! © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 13 september 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
Over the past three years, the Montreal Symphony Orchestra (a huge contributor to the Decca label since Charles Dutoit’s lead from 1977-2002) and Kent Nagano have been making an exciting series of recordings, focusing on rare works, namely Honegger-Ibert’s L’Aiglon and Leonard Bernstein’s A Quiet Place. Today, they continue their recording journey on American terrain, with a retrospective entirely dedicated to John Adams. They had left for unknown territory with Bernstein and now they return to town to celebrate one of the popes of minimalism. While Harmonielehre, a vast triptych composed in 1985 (a humble tribute to the early 20th century with perceptible influences from Wagner, Schönberg, Sibelius and Ravel) and the exciting fanfare Short Ride in a Fast Machine composed for orchestra in 1986 have been superbly championed by Sir Simon Rattle (EMI, Birmingham, 1993) as well as Michael Tilson Thomas (San Francisco, 2010-2011), few have recorded Common Tones in Simple Time (the composer’s first work for a large orchestra written in 1979) since Edo de Waart’s recording for Nonesuch in November 1986 at Davies Symphony Hall. The piece recalls Stravinsky’s Petrushka and Kent Nagano’s fluid and gentle touch is perfectly suited to this absolutely fascinating score. Throughout the other works in the programme the American conductor is consistent with his own rather “pointillist” style. In fact, Adams is almost like a modern transcription of Seurat’s paintings. This great clarity in the harmonic superimpositions also reveals the clear influence of Berg and Webern in The Anfortas Wound and allows for new balances in the incipit of the final part of Harmonielehre (Meister Eckhardt and Quackie), one of John Adams’ most striking scores, especially since the tempos and rhythms remain measured here (unlike Michael Tilson Thomas’s interpretation), giving a stirring new version of an unmissable major work. However, the greatest highlight of this anthology is still Common Tones in Simple Time, which almost sounds like a sonic representation of Van Gogh’s Starry Night. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Operafragmenten - Verschenen op 8 november 2019 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
The Franco-Italian tenor Roberto Alagna associates much of his childhood memory with the figure of Enrico Caruso, the first modern tenor. Alagna superimposes the memory of his great grandparents, who knew the illustrious tenor in New York at the beginning of the last century, with that of the Richard Thorpe film The Great Caruso starring Mario Lanza which he watched when he was a little boy. These memories never left him and, with his teacher Rafael Ruiz, a young Roberto listened with passion to Caruso’s recordings while trying to pull apart the art of his singing. And now, fully matured, it makes sense that Alagna should finally dedicate an album to his idol, a project long in the waiting. Respecting the style and vocal delivery of Caruso all while conserving his own vocal identity, Robert Alagna has released here a generous album that endeavours to re-establish the discography of his glorious fellow-singer from 1902 to 1920. All in all, the work consists of twenty tracks that interpret the songs recorded by Caruso: sometimes operatic and sometimes more popular in style, Alagna includes an interpretation of Lucio Dalla’s Caruso, a tune written in 1986 about the final days of the tenor in the Sorrente Vittoria Hotel, with an arrangement by Yvan Cassar that does not undermine the rest of the album. A true 2019 vintage if you will. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 11 oktober 2019 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
Although he's alone on the cover, baritone Christian Gerhaher has given a lot of space over to soprano Camilla Tilling in his Schumann record. And so the original tones – and therefore the cycle's structure – are preserved. The voices mingle and their dialogue reminds us that these Lieder were presented to Clara like a wedding bouquet. The sound recording sometimes plunges both voice and piano into a maelstrom of noise. But happily, the performers offer an amorous reading of these poems borrowed from Goethe, or Rückert, or Burns. Both singers savour each consonant and give the poems a resounding, perfect pronunciation, and an unerring sense of diction (take Camilla Tilling's oh-so-sensual repetition of Kuß in Die Lotosblume, every bit as distracting as Margaret Price's), and of recital (the successive episodes of Hochländers Abschied take life in the hands of Christian Gerhaher, a virtuoso of nuance). With accompaniment from pianist Gerold Huber, they have created a very fine record that brings to life that marvellous poet of sound, Schumann. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz