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Klassiek - Verschijnt op 8 oktober 2021 | Sony Classical

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Klassiek - Verschijnt op 1 oktober 2021 | Profil

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 3 september 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 3 september 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 23 april 2021 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
«Clearly Bruckner’s music is like the wind that bloweth where it listeth in a world far removed from capitals and concert halls. The music that Bruckner wrote was not chic and sophisticated but elemental, radical and uncompromising. In spite of all its art, there is a powerful affinity with nature, with the mysticism of nature and with a sense of autochthonous earthiness, notably in Bruckner’s dance movements: as Thielemann says, Bruckner is no poseur; his music is never pretentious. There is a closeness, finally, with the open countryside, with an endless expanse, with extended journeys and with slowness.» (© Wolfgang Stähr / Sony Classical)

Klassiek - Verschenen op 27 februari 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 11 februari 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Opera - Verschenen op 5 februari 2021 | Orfeo

Booklet
This live recording of Ariadne auf Naxos in October 2014 took place not only at the site of the opera premiere of the version of the opera that we are best familiar with these days, but it also testifies Christian Thielemann’s first conducting engagement of a scenic performance of a Strauss opera at the opera house on the Ring. The cast includes Soile Isokoski as Ariadne, Johan Botha – in one of his latest performances before his untimely death – as Bachus, Daniela Fally as Zerbinetta, Sophie Koch as the composer, Jochen Schmeckenbecher as the music teacher and Peter Matic as the dancing master. Many attendees of the premiere of Strauss‘ first version of Ariadne - which was intended to succeed Moliere’s Le Bourgeois gentilhomme and for this reason was six hours long – felt that they had just been part of a first-rate funeral. It had become obvious that this third cooperational work with Hugo von Hofmannsthal needed some restructuring. As a consequence, the Moliere piece was replaced with the Prologue, and premiered four years later on 4 October 1916 at Vienna’s Court Opera (today’s State Opera). In March 2021, Ariadne returns to the Vienna State Opera’s playing schedule. © Orfeo

Klassiek - Verschenen op 9 januari 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 20 november 2020 | Profil

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen 5 de Diapason
To say that Christian Thielemann's early March 2020 Gurre-Lieder at the Semperoper Dresden didn't take place a moment too soon is something of an understatement, when less than a fortnight later Europe's international-level live music making scene had been reduced to solo recitals self-filmed on mobile phones and posted onto social media. Equally fortuitously, it was recorded live, meaning we can now all listen to this ambitious project with its international line-up that would, had 2020 turned out differently, have received a second airing the following month at the Salzburg Easter Festival.Broad brushstrokes first, and in orchestral terms there's a wonderful transparency to the sound from the Staatskapelle Dresden bolstered by members of the Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra. As for tone colour, think silvery luminosity from the upper strings and woodwind, balanced by warm, rounded richness from the brass and lower strings - it's both luxuriously warm and sharply defined, making for a heavenly Prelude and Zwischenspiel, and full-throttle drama for the conclusion of Part 2. As for the chorus, there's some thrilling singing from the MDR-Rundfunkchor and Staatsopernchor Dresden, and while “Seht die Sonne” would possibly have packed even more of a punch when heard in the hall (they are perhaps slightly further back in the sound than a studio recording might have given us), “Gegrüßt, o König, an Gurre-Seestrand!” is unequivocally edge-of-the-seat stuff. Thielemann's overall architecture is also eminently satisfying, including a notably seamless-feeling transition over the stylistic shift between parts two and three.On to the soloists, and Camilla Nylund's Tove is warm and supple, losing not an iota of its mellow roundedness as she soars up high, with the climax of her “Du sendest mir einen Liebesblick” truly tingle-inducing. Dark-toned Stephen Gould as Waldemar is ardent in love, and especially compelling in despair, always in control of his own high-register leaps. Christa Mayer's Woodtaube is rich-voiced and passionate, and Kwangchul Youn's Bauer ringing and energetic. Wolfgang Ablinger-Sperrhacke makes for a colourful and enjoyably semi- raucous Klaus-Narr; and while Franz Grundheber may no longer be in his baritone prime, his voice is deliciously expressive and multicoloured in his sprechstimme Speaker role, and with a flexibility and strength thoroughly belying his eighty-plus years.If this cast ever gets reunited post-Covid then you should beg, borrow or steal a ticket. In the meantime, crank up the volume on this, and revel in it. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 23 oktober 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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The global spread of the Covid-19 pandemic has had disastrous consequences across many domains, particularly culture and music. Concerts and festivals have been cancelled worldwide and it has required a great deal of ingenuity for artists and organisers to find a way to spread their message. The Bayreuth Festival was no exception to the crisis’ wrath, but Christian Thielemann decided to hold a virtual festival (in which operas are filmed and shown online) with a real-life concert in Villa Wahnfried, built by Wagner to house his entire family within close proximity to the Festival Theatre (thanks to the generosity of King Louis II of Bavaria). The audience, masked and installed in the garden, respect social distancing and follow the concert on large video screens. The anecdote is well-known, Siegrief-Idyll was composed as a birthday present for Cosima Wagner-Liszt and was played on Christmas morning 1870 by thirteen musicians in Tribschen, where the soon-to-be wedded couple were staying next to Lake Lucerne. This original and intimate interpretation by Christian Thielemann is played with a collection of musicians that were set to play the 2020 Festival. For the occasion, German composer and arranger, Andreas N. Tarkmann, has realised a deft instrumentation of Wesendonck-Lieder which is played by the same musicians. The works are sung by the great Wagner soprano Camilla Nylund, who was also unable to perform at the 2020 festival like the rest of her colleagues. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 23 oktober 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
The global spread of the Covid-19 pandemic has had disastrous consequences across many domains, particularly culture and music. Concerts and festivals have been cancelled worldwide and it has required a great deal of ingenuity for artists and organisers to find a way to spread their message. The Bayreuth Festival was no exception to the crisis’ wrath, but Christian Thielemann decided to hold a virtual festival (in which operas are filmed and shown online) with a real-life concert in Villa Wahnfried, built by Wagner to house his entire family within close proximity to the Festival Theatre (thanks to the generosity of King Louis II of Bavaria). The audience, masked and installed in the garden, respect social distancing and follow the concert on large video screens. The anecdote is well-known, Siegrief-Idyll was composed as a birthday present for Cosima Wagner-Liszt and was played on Christmas morning 1870 by thirteen musicians in Tribschen, where the soon-to-be wedded couple were staying next to Lake Lucerne. This original and intimate interpretation by Christian Thielemann is played with a collection of musicians that were set to play the 2020 Festival. For the occasion, German composer and arranger, Andreas N. Tarkmann, has realised a deft instrumentation of Wesendonck-Lieder which is played by the same musicians. The works are sung by the great Wagner soprano Camilla Nylund, who was also unable to perform at the 2020 festival like the rest of her colleagues. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 16 oktober 2020 | Sony Classical

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 20 november 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Deutsche Grammophon issued this live Beethoven performance in 2020, putatively in celebration of the 250th anniversary of Beethoven's birth. It's taken from a live recording of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Op. 15, by Rudolf Buchbinder, made at the Philharmonie in Berlin with the Berlin Philharmonic in 2016. This may seem an odd choice in that there already existed a live performance of the concerto by Buchbinder, with the Berlin Philharmonic, in the Philharmonie, on the Sony label. That might seem to make this release of most interest to fans of this legendary pianist, for the two performances are pretty close in tempo and in overall approach. The differences do not amount to a rethinking of the work, but they do have the effect of taking one into Buchbinder's mind a bit. The biggest difference is that on the Sony performance, Buchbinder conducted the performance from the keyboard, while here, the Philharmonic is led by Christian Thielemann. Compare the solo entrances in the Piano Concerto No. 1. In this performance, Buchbinder is a bit more restrained, as if to leave room for interaction between himself and Thielemann, and the orchestra is more assertive, with a strong element of the active timpani that is one of the hallmarks of this concerto. It's a rare example of how a top-flight pianist adjusts a performance to fit the circumstances, and neither version is superior to the other. Another distinctive feature of this album is the strong performance of the Six Variations for piano in F major, Op. 34, an underplayed work in which Beethoven broke new ground in the variation form. Buchbinder captures the work's adventurous quality in a performance of unusually Romantic intensity. That brings the total for the program up to only 49 minutes, and one wonders what else was on the 2016 Philharmonie program. A plus, though, is the superb live sound from the Philharmonie, an act that Deutsche Grammophon's engineers have down pat. Of most interest to Buchbinder fans, but certainly intriguing for anyone. © TiVo
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Klassiek - Verschenen op 20 november 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Deutsche Grammophon issued this live Beethoven performance in 2020, putatively in celebration of the 250th anniversary of Beethoven's birth. It's taken from a live recording of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Op. 15, by Rudolf Buchbinder, made at the Philharmonie in Berlin with the Berlin Philharmonic in 2016. This may seem an odd choice in that there already existed a live performance of the concerto by Buchbinder, with the Berlin Philharmonic, in the Philharmonie, on the Sony label. That might seem to make this release of most interest to fans of this legendary pianist, for the two performances are pretty close in tempo and in overall approach. The differences do not amount to a rethinking of the work, but they do have the effect of taking one into Buchbinder's mind a bit. The biggest difference is that on the Sony performance, Buchbinder conducted the performance from the keyboard, while here, the Philharmonic is led by Christian Thielemann. Compare the solo entrances in the Piano Concerto No. 1. In this performance, Buchbinder is a bit more restrained, as if to leave room for interaction between himself and Thielemann, and the orchestra is more assertive, with a strong element of the active timpani that is one of the hallmarks of this concerto. It's a rare example of how a top-flight pianist adjusts a performance to fit the circumstances, and neither version is superior to the other. Another distinctive feature of this album is the strong performance of the Six Variations for piano in F major, Op. 34, an underplayed work in which Beethoven broke new ground in the variation form. Buchbinder captures the work's adventurous quality in a performance of unusually Romantic intensity. That brings the total for the program up to only 49 minutes, and one wonders what else was on the 2016 Philharmonie program. A plus, though, is the superb live sound from the Philharmonie, an act that Deutsche Grammophon's engineers have down pat. Of most interest to Buchbinder fans, but certainly intriguing for anyone. © TiVo
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Opera - Verschenen op 18 september 2020 | Profil

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Opera - Verschenen op 3 april 2020 | Orfeo

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 29 november 2019 | Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 1 november 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassiek - Verschenen op 14 juni 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
A long break. In the fall of 2018, Renée Fleming sang for Broadway musicals under the BBC Concert Orchestra led by Rob Fisher including the likes of Jerome Kern, Richard Rogers, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Stephen Sondheim, and some lesser-known names. A little unexpected yet welcome, with this new work, the American soprano returns to a more traditional repertoire. To be precise, she puts forward a very beautiful selection of Brahms’ Lieder, the entirety of Schumann’s Fraueliebe und -Leben Op. 42, and finally Mahler’s Rückert-Lieder in an orchestral interpretation led by Christian Thielemann with the Münchner Philharmoniker. Today, Renée Fleming’s tone is perfectly crepuscular, autumnal and suitable for these Lieders filled with melancholy. Harmut Höll’s accompaniments are beautiful (especially in Brahms), and the direction of Thielemann is often poetic