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Operafragmenten - Verschenen op 5 oktober 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - Qobuzism
For her first recital with orchestra album, young Franco-Danish soprano Elsa Dreisig had the idea of presenting five pairs of songs in which each part of the pair is ambiguously related to the other, like a mirror’s reflection. This process leads to striking juxtapositions of different musical styles, dramatic moments, historical periods and contrasting voices; classicism and romanticism complement each other, terror answers joy, and the result is a view of the feminine soul all its facets. The first pairing involves two mirrors: the one in which Marguerite from Gounod's Faust admires herself and Thaïs's mirror in Massenet's opera (Thaïs). There follows Puccini's vision of Manon Lescaut, and then Manon (sans Lescaut) as imagined by Massenet. Following this we have Juliette, this is a rather daring pairing of the largely-forgotten early romantic German composer Daniel Steibelt with Gounod's Juliette. Elsa Dreisig then moves onto the two famous Figaros, one from Rossini's Barber (Rosina) and the other from Mozart's Marriage, with the gentle tones of the Countess. Finally, and more daring still, we end with the Salome of the Hérodiade by Massenet, a tender young woman who is not after anyone's head; and then Strauss's Salome, with her sanguinary madness. Probably in order to avoid the temptation of comparisons with other recordings, our singer has opted for the 1907 French version – note that this work by Oscar Wilde was itself originally written in French. This is the most extraordinary selection that one could hope for in a first recording from any artist, all accompanied by the Montpelier Orchestra, conducted by Michael Schønwandt. © SM/Qobuz
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Symfonische muziek - Verschenen op 5 oktober 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
Sir Andrew Davis returns to his exploration of Holst’s orchestral works with the brilliant BBC Philharmonic, a series initiated almost ten years ago by the late Richard Hickox, then taken over by another expert in British repertoire. This selection of orchestral works by Holst provides a remarkable overview of his career, ranging from such early works as A Winder Idyll – composed in 1897 when he was still studying at the Royal College of Music – to the Scherzo of a symphony on which he was working towards the end of his life. None of the music recorded here was published in his lifetime, and the Scherzo – rarely heard though it is – is the only work to have entered the repertoire. A Moorside Suite, originally written for brass band, is featured here in the composer's rarely heard arrangement for strings. The young British cellist Guy Johnston is the soloist in Invocation, one of Holst’s most significant works, calling for a subtle balance of virtuosity and expressive qualities. © Chandos

Symfonische muziek - Verschenen op 5 oktober 2018 | ICA Classics

Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica
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Concerten voor klavier - Verschenen op 12 oktober 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - 5 étoiles de Classica
Staying true to himself, harpsichordist Jean Rondeau stirs up another musical storm. In his interpretation of around fifteen Sonatas by Scarlatti, he unleashes a kind of rawness, a poetic rawness, as if he had invented the sonatas on the spot. But no, no, they are indeed Scarlatti’s sonatas! On the other hand, Domenico's letter to Queen Marie-Barbara de Bragança, found in the accompanying booklet, is factually apocryphal. She was his pupil as early as 1720 and continued to be until her royal marriage to the Spanish court; it seems that it was for her that he wrote his approximately five hundred and fifty-five sonatas, that is to say that he had found a student worthy of his genius. The farce on the ninth track is also apocryphal, which Rondeau uses as an interlude between the two “parts” of his programme. It is a funny little improvisation of jumbled notes and clusters - enough to clean the ears between the two Scarlattis. The instrument used here is quite amazing; it is a harpsichord “based on German models”, built in 2006 by Jonte Knif & Arno Pelto. It offers an extremely rich sound with a rather unusual tone, showing that it takes more than just pressing the keys of a harpsichord to get the desired sound. With his very personal technique, Rondeau makes his harpsichord wonderfully unique, giving the baroque music an incredibly modern feel. © SM/Qobuz
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Missen, passies, requiems - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - 5 étoiles de Classica
The modern-day appreciation of Francesco Bartolomeo Conti takes a decisive turn in the direction of his church music with this early eighteenth-century composer’s Missa Sancti Pauli given an ideal recording on Glossa by György Vashegyi, the Purcell Choir and Orfeo Orchestra. Conti was a Florentine who worked for much of his career in the Imperial Court in Vienna, generating much attention there – the ever-observant Johann Sebastian Bach and Zelenka were both known to have been attracted by his music. Curiously, it was liturgical works like this 1715 Missa Sancti Pauli which kept Conti’s name known until near to the end of the nineteenth century rather than the operas, oratorios and cantatas with which he delighted the Viennese Court and which have hitherto been receiving the attention of artists and record labels today. If Conti’s church music is less fledgling Classical than his dramatic fare, there is much in the way of melodic tunefulness and concertato style – for both voices and instruments – to combine with fugalimitative writing reminiscent of the “stile antico”. The work is a “Credo Mass” (both Mozart and Beethoven were to write examples of this genre, with its rondolike restatement of the word in the Credo section. The tone, control, presence and unity of the Purcell Choir have been amply demonstrated already on Glossa in music of the French Baroque – Rameau and Mondonville in particular – and the singers are given full opportunity to shine in Conti’s mass – as are the orchestra, comprised mainly of strings, and the vocal soloists, who include Adriána Kalafszky, Péter Bárány, Zoltán Megyesi and Thomas Dolié. Bárány and Megyesi are also soloists in two additional works: the motet, Fastos caeli audite and the aria Pie Jesu, ad te refugio. © Glossa
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Metronome

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
François Couperin was the most illustrious member of a dynasty of musicians comparable to that of the Bach family. There is every reason to believe that his name "Couperin the Great", first found in writing in 1780, had already been bestowed upon him during his lifetime to distinguish him from the other musicians in his family. In addition to his duties as the King's organist at Versailles, Couperin taught the harpsichord to many students from the royal family and the ranks of the nobility and, at the turn of the century, he was as active a composer as he was a performer. His work for harpsichord represents the most prominent part of his musical production with his pedagogical work L'Art de toucher le clavecin, or “The Art of Playing the Harpsichord” in English. The work was published in 1716 and deals with ornamentation, fingering, the general position of the body, – particularly focusing on the wrists - the touch, the character of the instrument, and so on. Also from this fruitful period we find his twenty-seven "orders" - a term he used to refer to a group of pieces with similar tonalities, halfway between a suite and an anthology. The work is divided into four volumes, published between 1713 and 1730. He develops a world of poetic fantasy that takes on the form of simple dance movements, portraits, "character pieces", pastoral paintings or theatrical miniatures. Here the Swedish harpsichordist Carole Cerasi offers us the complete works, spread over ten albums including L'Art de toucher le clavecin and the four Books, which she distributes over six different harpsichords.The first volume opens with L'art, which Cerasi performs on an Antwerp Ruckers model from 1624; it continues with the First Book which also covers the second and third volumes. This book contains five orders; it was published in 1713, although several of the pieces it contains had been written years earlier. For the First Book , Carole Cerasi plays an Antwerp harpsichord by Andreas Ruckers, built in 1636 and reworked in 1763 in Paris by Henri Hemsch, giving a Franco-Flemish sound! © SM/Qobuz
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Metronome

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
François Couperin was the most illustrious member of a dynasty of musicians comparable to that of the Bach family. There is every reason to believe that his name "Couperin the Great", first found in writing in 1780, had already been bestowed upon him during his lifetime to distinguish him from the other musicians in his family. In addition to his duties as the King's organist at Versailles, Couperin taught the harpsichord to many students from the royal family and the ranks of the nobility and, at the turn of the century, he was as active a composer as he was a performer. His work for harpsichord represents the most prominent part of his musical production with his pedagogical work L'Art de toucher le clavecin, or “The Art of Playing the Harpsichord” in English. The work was published in 1716 and deals with ornamentation, fingering, the general position of the body, – particularly focusing on the wrists - the touch, the character of the instrument, and so on. Also from this fruitful period we find his twenty-seven "orders" - a term he used to refer to a group of pieces with similar tonalities, halfway between a suite and an anthology. The work is divided into four volumes, published between 1713 and 1730. He develops a world of poetic fantasy that takes on the form of simple dance movements, portraits, "character pieces", pastoral paintings or theatrical miniatures. Here the Swedish harpsichordist Carole Cerasi offers us the complete works, spread over ten albums including L'Art de toucher le clavecin and the four Books, which she distributes over six different harpsichords. The first volume opens with L'art, which Cerasi performs on an Antwerp Ruckers model from 1624; it continues with the First Book which also covers the second and third volumes. This book contains five orders; it was published in 1713, although several of the pieces it contains had been written years earlier. For the First Book , Carole Cerasi plays an Antwerp harpsichord by Andreas Ruckers, built in 1636 and reworked in 1763 in Paris by Henri Hemsch, giving a Franco-Flemish sound! © SM/Qobuz
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Liederen (Duitsland) - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Orfeo

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
Finally, a happy record! It’s a simple recipe: take four experienced singers who know each other well, add two complicit pianists, then pick out some works that are bursting with happiness. It’s rare to find such happiness in Schumann and Brahms’ work. The two composers shared a tendency to lean towards melancholic music, a "Sehnsucht" style which is so characteristic of German romanticism. Schumann wrote Spanisches Liederspiel Op. 74 in 1849. It’s a kind of love story, the first steps towards happiness. The work requires a theatrical and playful performance, which was perfectly accomplished here at this concert from the end of the 1974 Salzburg Festival, once the press had left the establishment. While there are few written traces that remain of this concert, the recording has preserved it for us. Here, Orfeo brings us this little miracle with four soloists at the top of their game, accompanied by two pianists who are well accustomed to the difficult task of supporting the singers. Shumann’s rare work is complemented by Brahms' famous eighteen vocal waltzes, given the collective title of Liebeslieder-Walzer Op. 52. An exceptional musical achievement. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Metronome

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
François Couperin was the most illustrious member of a dynasty of musicians comparable to that of the Bach family. There is every reason to believe that his name "Couperin the Great", first found in writing in 1780, had already been bestowed upon him during his lifetime to distinguish him from the other musicians in his family. In addition to his duties as the King's organist at Versailles, Couperin taught the harpsichord to many students from the royal family and the ranks of the nobility and, at the turn of the century, he was as active a composer as he was a performer. His work for harpsichord represents the most prominent part of his musical production with his pedagogical work L'Art de toucher le clavecin, or “The Art of Playing the Harpsichord” in English. The work was published in 1716 and deals with ornamentation, fingering, the general position of the body, – particularly focusing on the wrists - the touch, the character of the instrument, and so on. Also from this fruitful period we find his twenty-seven "orders" - a term he used to refer to a group of pieces with similar tonalities, halfway between a suite and an anthology. The work is divided into four volumes, published between 1713 and 1730. He develops a world of poetic fantasy that takes on the form of simple dance movements, portraits, "character pieces", pastoral paintings or theatrical miniatures. Here the Swedish harpsichordist Carole Cerasi offers us the complete works, spread over ten albums including L'Art de toucher le clavecin and the four Books, which she distributes over six different harpsichords.Volumes 4, 5 and the first half of the 6th include the entire Second Book, published in 1717. His seven orders, which vary hugely in size, contain some pieces that have become famous outside their context: Les Moissoneurs and Les Baricades Mistérieuses. Anna Magdalena Bach had included the Bergeries in her Clavierbüchlein dating from 1725 - proof that Bach held Couperin in very high esteem. In the Eleventh Order we find the satirical piece Les Fastes de la Grande et Ancienne Mxnxstrxndxsx, a joke by Couperin which we should read as "Ménéstrandise.” This was a brotherhood of musicians founded in 1321 who tried to impose a tax on musicians who were not members, including harpsichordists. Couperin was one of those who protested before the King and the Ménéstrandise was dissolved. The Second Book is divided between two harpsichords, a copy of a Parisian instrument by Antoine Vater (1738) and the copy of the 1624 Ruckers harpsichord again, which had been used for L'Art de toucher le clavecin. © SM/Qobuz
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Metronome

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
François Couperin was the most illustrious member of a dynasty of musicians comparable to that of the Bach family. There is every reason to believe that his name "Couperin the Great", first found in writing in 1780, had already been bestowed upon him during his lifetime to distinguish him from the other musicians in his family. In addition to his duties as the King's organist at Versailles, Couperin taught the harpsichord to many students from the royal family and the ranks of the nobility and, at the turn of the century, he was as active a composer as he was a performer. His work for harpsichord represents the most prominent part of his musical production with his pedagogical work L'Art de toucher le clavecin, or “The Art of Playing the Harpsichord” in English. The work was published in 1716 and deals with ornamentation, fingering, the general position of the body, – particularly focusing on the wrists - the touch, the character of the instrument, and so on. Also from this fruitful period we find his twenty-seven "orders" - a term he used to refer to a group of pieces with similar tonalities, halfway between a suite and an anthology. The work is divided into four volumes, published between 1713 and 1730. He develops a world of poetic fantasy that takes on the form of simple dance movements, portraits, "character pieces", pastoral paintings or theatrical miniatures. Here the Swedish harpsichordist Carole Cerasi offers us the complete works, spread over ten albums including L'Art de toucher le clavecin and the four Books, which she distributes over six different harpsichords. Volumes 4, 5 and the first half of the 6th include the entire Second Book, published in 1717. His seven orders, which vary hugely in size, contain some pieces that have become famous outside their context: Les Moissoneurs and Les Baricades Mistérieuses. Anna Magdalena Bach had included the Bergeries in her Clavierbüchlein dating from 1725 - proof that Bach held Couperin in very high esteem. In the Eleventh Order we find the satirical piece Les Fastes de la Grande et Ancienne Mxnxstrxndxsx, a joke by Couperin which we should read as "Ménéstrandise.” This was a brotherhood of musicians founded in 1321 who tried to impose a tax on musicians who were not members, including harpsichordists. Couperin was one of those who protested before the King and the Ménéstrandise was dissolved. The Second Book is divided between two harpsichords, a copy of a Parisian instrument by Antoine Vater (1738) and the copy of the 1624 Ruckers harpsichord again, which had been used for L'Art de toucher le clavecin. © SM/Qobuz
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Metronome

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
François Couperin was the most illustrious member of a dynasty of musicians comparable to that of the Bach family. There is every reason to believe that his name "Couperin the Great", first found in writing in 1780, had already been bestowed upon him during his lifetime to distinguish him from the other musicians in his family. In addition to his duties as the King's organist at Versailles, Couperin taught the harpsichord to many students from the royal family and the ranks of the nobility and, at the turn of the century, he was as active a composer as he was a performer. His work for harpsichord represents the most prominent part of his musical production with his pedagogical work L'Art de toucher le clavecin, or “The Art of Playing the Harpsichord” in English. The work was published in 1716 and deals with ornamentation, fingering, the general position of the body, – particularly focusing on the wrists - the touch, the character of the instrument, and so on. Also from this fruitful period we find his twenty-seven "orders" - a term he used to refer to a group of pieces with similar tonalities, halfway between a suite and an anthology. The work is divided into four volumes, published between 1713 and 1730. He develops a world of poetic fantasy that takes on the form of simple dance movements, portraits, "character pieces", pastoral paintings or theatrical miniatures. Here the Swedish harpsichordist Carole Cerasi offers us the complete works, spread over ten albums including L'Art de toucher le clavecin and the four Books, which she distributes over six different harpsichords.The Fourth Book was published in 1730, when the composer was sixty-two years old and his health was deteriorating. He stated in his preface, "as my health is getting worse from day to day, my friends have advised me to stop working and I have not written any major works since". It is composed of eight orders, but it should be noted that these sequences become shorter and shorter, with only four or five movements in some of them – miniscule if we compare them, for example, to the First Order from Book One which had about twenty! To bid farewell to the life and music of the great Couperin, Carole Cerasi selected a French instrument by Antoine Vater from 1738 - around the same time as the publication of his final Book, which covers the eighth, ninth and tenth (last) volumes of this complete work. © SM/Qobuz
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Metronome

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
François Couperin was the most illustrious member of a dynasty of musicians comparable to that of the Bach family. There is every reason to believe that his name "Couperin the Great", first found in writing in 1780, had already been bestowed upon him during his lifetime to distinguish him from the other musicians in his family. In addition to his duties as the King's organist at Versailles, Couperin taught the harpsichord to many students from the royal family and the ranks of the nobility and, at the turn of the century, he was as active a composer as he was a performer. His work for harpsichord represents the most prominent part of his musical production with his pedagogical work L'Art de toucher le clavecin, or “The Art of Playing the Harpsichord” in English. The work was published in 1716 and deals with ornamentation, fingering, the general position of the body, – particularly focusing on the wrists - the touch, the character of the instrument, and so on. Also from this fruitful period we find his twenty-seven "orders" - a term he used to refer to a group of pieces with similar tonalities, halfway between a suite and an anthology. The work is divided into four volumes, published between 1713 and 1730. He develops a world of poetic fantasy that takes on the form of simple dance movements, portraits, "character pieces", pastoral paintings or theatrical miniatures. Here the Swedish harpsichordist Carole Cerasi offers us the complete works, spread over ten albums including L'Art de toucher le clavecin and the four Books, which she distributes over six different harpsichords.The Fourth Book was published in 1730, when the composer was sixty-two years old and his health was deteriorating. He stated in his preface, "as my health is getting worse from day to day, my friends have advised me to stop working and I have not written any major works since". It is composed of eight orders, but it should be noted that these sequences become shorter and shorter, with only four or five movements in some of them – miniscule if we compare them, for example, to the First Order from Book One which had about twenty! To bid farewell to the life and music of the great Couperin, Carole Cerasi selected a French instrument by Antoine Vater from 1738 - around the same time as the publication of his final Book, which covers the eighth, ninth and tenth (last) volumes of this complete work. © SM/Qobuz
HI-RES€ 14,99
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Metronome

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
François Couperin was the most illustrious member of a dynasty of musicians comparable to that of the Bach family. There is every reason to believe that his name "Couperin the Great", first found in writing in 1780, had already been bestowed upon him during his lifetime to distinguish him from the other musicians in his family. In addition to his duties as the King's organist at Versailles, Couperin taught the harpsichord to many students from the royal family and the ranks of the nobility and, at the turn of the century, he was as active a composer as he was a performer. His work for harpsichord represents the most prominent part of his musical production with his pedagogical work L'Art de toucher le clavecin, or “The Art of Playing the Harpsichord” in English. The work was published in 1716 and deals with ornamentation, fingering, the general position of the body, – particularly focusing on the wrists - the touch, the character of the instrument, and so on. Also from this fruitful period we find his twenty-seven "orders" - a term he used to refer to a group of pieces with similar tonalities, halfway between a suite and an anthology. The work is divided into four volumes, published between 1713 and 1730. He develops a world of poetic fantasy that takes on the form of simple dance movements, portraits, "character pieces", pastoral paintings or theatrical miniatures. Here the Swedish harpsichordist Carole Cerasi offers us the complete works, spread over ten albums including L'Art de toucher le clavecin and the four Books, which she distributes over six different harpsichords. The first volume opens with L'art, which Cerasi performs on an Antwerp Ruckers model from 1624; it continues with the First Book which also covers the second and third volumes. This book contains five orders; it was published in 1713, although several of the pieces it contains had been written years earlier. For the First Book , Carole Cerasi plays an Antwerp harpsichord by Andreas Ruckers, built in 1636 and reworked in 1763 in Paris by Henri Hemsch, giving a Franco-Flemish sound! © SM/Qobuz
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Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Metronome

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
François Couperin was the most illustrious member of a dynasty of musicians comparable to that of the Bach family. There is every reason to believe that his name "Couperin the Great", first found in writing in 1780, had already been bestowed upon him during his lifetime to distinguish him from the other musicians in his family. In addition to his duties as the King's organist at Versailles, Couperin taught the harpsichord to many students from the royal family and the ranks of the nobility and, at the turn of the century, he was as active a composer as he was a performer. His work for harpsichord represents the most prominent part of his musical production with his pedagogical work L'Art de toucher le clavecin, or “The Art of Playing the Harpsichord” in English. The work was published in 1716 and deals with ornamentation, fingering, the general position of the body, – particularly focusing on the wrists - the touch, the character of the instrument, and so on. Also from this fruitful period we find his twenty-seven "orders" - a term he used to refer to a group of pieces with similar tonalities, halfway between a suite and an anthology. The work is divided into four volumes, published between 1713 and 1730. He develops a world of poetic fantasy that takes on the form of simple dance movements, portraits, "character pieces", pastoral paintings or theatrical miniatures. Here the Swedish harpsichordist Carole Cerasi offers us the complete works, spread over ten albums including L'Art de toucher le clavecin and the four Books, which she distributes over six different harpsichords.Volumes 4, 5 and the first half of the 6th include the entire Second Book, published in 1717. His seven orders, which vary hugely in size, contain some pieces that have become famous outside their context: Les Moissoneurs and Les Baricades Mistérieuses. Anna Magdalena Bach had included the Bergeries in her Clavierbüchlein dating from 1725 - proof that Bach held Couperin in very high esteem. In the Eleventh Order we find the satirical piece Les Fastes de la Grande et Ancienne Mxnxstrxndxsx, a joke by Couperin which we should read as "Ménéstrandise.” This was a brotherhood of musicians founded in 1321 who tried to impose a tax on musicians who were not members, including harpsichordists. Couperin was one of those who protested before the King and the Ménéstrandise was dissolved. The Second Book is divided between two harpsichords, a copy of a Parisian instrument by Antoine Vater (1738) and the copy of the 1624 Ruckers harpsichord again, which had been used for L'Art de toucher le clavecin. © SM/Qobuz
HI-RES€ 14,99
CD€ 9,99

Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Metronome

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
François Couperin was the most illustrious member of a dynasty of musicians comparable to that of the Bach family. There is every reason to believe that his name "Couperin the Great", first found in writing in 1780, had already been bestowed upon him during his lifetime to distinguish him from the other musicians in his family. In addition to his duties as the King's organist at Versailles, Couperin taught the harpsichord to many students from the royal family and the ranks of the nobility and, at the turn of the century, he was as active a composer as he was a performer. His work for harpsichord represents the most prominent part of his musical production with his pedagogical work L'Art de toucher le clavecin, or “The Art of Playing the Harpsichord” in English. The work was published in 1716 and deals with ornamentation, fingering, the general position of the body, – particularly focusing on the wrists - the touch, the character of the instrument, and so on. Also from this fruitful period we find his twenty-seven "orders" - a term he used to refer to a group of pieces with similar tonalities, halfway between a suite and an anthology. The work is divided into four volumes, published between 1713 and 1730. He develops a world of poetic fantasy that takes on the form of simple dance movements, portraits, "character pieces", pastoral paintings or theatrical miniatures. Here the Swedish harpsichordist Carole Cerasi offers us the complete works, spread over ten albums including L'Art de toucher le clavecin and the four Books, which she distributes over six different harpsichords.The Fourth Book was published in 1730, when the composer was sixty-two years old and his health was deteriorating. He stated in his preface, "as my health is getting worse from day to day, my friends have advised me to stop working and I have not written any major works since". It is composed of eight orders, but it should be noted that these sequences become shorter and shorter, with only four or five movements in some of them – miniscule if we compare them, for example, to the First Order from Book One which had about twenty! To bid farewell to the life and music of the great Couperin, Carole Cerasi selected a French instrument by Antoine Vater from 1738 - around the same time as the publication of his final Book, which covers the eighth, ninth and tenth (last) volumes of this complete work. © SM/Qobuz
HI-RES€ 14,99
CD€ 9,99

Kamermuziek - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Metronome

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
François Couperin was the most illustrious member of a dynasty of musicians comparable to that of the Bach family. There is every reason to believe that his name "Couperin the Great", first found in writing in 1780, had already been bestowed upon him during his lifetime to distinguish him from the other musicians in his family. In addition to his duties as the King's organist at Versailles, Couperin taught the harpsichord to many students from the royal family and the ranks of the nobility and, at the turn of the century, he was as active a composer as he was a performer. His work for harpsichord represents the most prominent part of his musical production with his pedagogical work L'Art de toucher le clavecin, or “The Art of Playing the Harpsichord” in English. The work was published in 1716 and deals with ornamentation, fingering, the general position of the body, – particularly focusing on the wrists - the touch, the character of the instrument, and so on. Also from this fruitful period we find his twenty-seven "orders" - a term he used to refer to a group of pieces with similar tonalities, halfway between a suite and an anthology. The work is divided into four volumes, published between 1713 and 1730. He develops a world of poetic fantasy that takes on the form of simple dance movements, portraits, "character pieces", pastoral paintings or theatrical miniatures. Here the Swedish harpsichordist Carole Cerasi offers us the complete works, spread over ten albums including L'Art de toucher le clavecin and the four Books, which she distributes over six different harpsichords.The Third Book was published in 1722, when the composer was fifty-four years old. In the preface he attacks some of the performers rather harshly: "I am always surprised (after the care I have taken to mark the embellishments that suit my Pieces) to hear some people who do not obey them. It is an unforgivable negligence to fail to include these musical flourishes, especially since they have not been added arbitrarily. I therefore declare that my pieces must be executed exactly as I have marked them. They will never make a lasting impression on people with good taste unless everything that I have marked on the scores is observed to the letter, no more no less.". The Third Book and its seven orders is divided between the second half of Carole Cerasi's sixth volume, the seventh, and the first half of the eighth. We find two harpsichords here again; a copy of a Parisian Pascal Taskin from 1769 and a copy of a Jean-Claude Goujon from 1749. © SM/Qobuz
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Opera - Verschenen op 19 oktober 2018 | Supraphon a.s.

Hi-Res Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or
HI-RES€ 17,49
CD€ 12,49

Concerten voor viool - Verschenen op 26 oktober 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
To say that the concerto was one of Haydn's favourite forms would be a bit much, daft even. The man wrote a good hundred symphonies, dozens of quartets, trios, piano sonatas, fifteen or so masses and as many operas, and oratorios... Currently we know of three violin concertos (others being lost or apocryphal), two cello concertos (others... see above), one horn concerto, one for trumpet (there are no others) and at most about ten concertos for piano. Musically, they are fascinating works, but the level of technical skill they demand runs from moderate to a bit tricky. But the First Cello Concerto is not without its moments of difficulty, such as the rapid high notes in the final movement, and it offers some real fireworks. It should also be noted that most of the concertos were written for Esterházy, specifically for the first soloists in the house orchestra of Konzertmeister Luigi Tomasini and first cellist Joseph Weigl. The orchestral accompaniments offered the soloists some fine backdrops: in particular in the second movement of the Concerto for violin in C Major , with the orchestra's string section accompanying the solo violin with a sort of lute-playing that becomes a kind of serenade à la Don Giovanni. Amandine Beyer takes up the violin for this recording, while Marco Ceccato deals with the cello solo – both members of the Gli Incogniti ensemble ("The Unknowns"), a fluid grouping that plays without a conductor. Their leaderless style means that the musicians all listen to one another: it's a lovely way of making music (and sadly rare in the world of orchestras). © SM/Qobuz
CD€ 29,99

Piano solo - Verschenen op 26 oktober 2018 | APR

Booklet Onderscheidingen Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice
When thinking of the great German pianist Wilhelm Backhaus, the image of an old master with a large pale forehead often comes to mind, frozen in his somewhat wise and austere performances. With his fierce young Beethoven-like appearance, Backhaus gave his first recital in 1899 while his last concert, by which time he was a respectable old man, took place on July 5 1969, a week before his death. The miraculous advances in recording preserved this brilliant seventy-year-long career, because, unlike his colleagues Rubinstein and Schnabel who shied away from vinyl, Backhaus was one of the pioneers of the medium, having made his first records in 1908. Created for His Master’s Voice (HMV) between 1925 and 1935 and carefully restored here, these recordings are mainly devoted to Chopin (with the first complete recording of the Études), Liszt and Schumann. In addition, the second part is reserved for the transcriptions that were popular in those distant times. While the young Backhaus’ technique is breathtaking, it also teaches us something about musical history. Styles of playing change over the years and no one today would dare to play at such a dizzying speed. It was after the Second World War that pianists became a little more relaxed and began to abandon the sacred "short pieces" to play Beethoven's or Schubert's great sonatas, finding more gravity in keeping with the spirit of the times. The tempos slowed down significantly while the invention of the microgroove made it possible to capture long pieces of music, more favourable to the outpouring of expression than the 78-rpm sides allowed. It is truly touching to return to these recordings that symbolise a world that was lost forever. © François Hudry/Qobuz