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Herbert Blomstedt|Schubert: Symphonies Nos. 8 "Unfinished" & 9 "The Great"

Schubert: Symphonies Nos. 8 "Unfinished" & 9 "The Great"

Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Herbert Blomstedt

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Woe betide the music writer who alludes to "valedictory" recordings by conductor Herbert Blomstedt, who at age 95 makes his debut on the Deutsche Grammophon label (perhaps he didn't want to peak too soon there) with the orchestra that premiered Schubert's Symphony No. 9 in C major, D. 944, the Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig. The man is unstoppable, and though he has recorded these works before, these are not retreads of the earlier recordings. Blomstedt takes all the repeats (which he has not done in the past), posing a significant physical challenge to the players. Bernard Haitink famously said it would kill his musicians, and he wasn't going to do that, but with a 95-year-old on the podium, chugging along, who was going to ask for a break? In Blomstedt's big-boned interpretation, it works. Things get off to a quick start, partly because Blomstedt follows the now generally accepted cut time for the symphony's opening bars. He sustains the momentum through all the repeats, emphasizing the brass and looking toward the big hinges on which Schubert's structure rests. It's not that Blomstedt avoids lyricism; the second theme of the first movement in the "Unfinished" symphony yields to none in Viennese tunefulness, but the Symphony No. 9 in Blomstedt's hands is a vast canvas that looks toward the future. The sound from the Gewandhaus is another major attraction in a recording that fully takes its place in the orchestra's storied history.
© James Manheim /TiVo

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Schubert: Symphonies Nos. 8 "Unfinished" & 9 "The Great"

Herbert Blomstedt

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Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 "Unfinished" (Franz Schubert)

1
I. Allegro moderato
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
00:14:48

Franz Schubert, Composer - René Möller, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Herbert Blomstedt, Conductor, MainArtist - Gewandhausorchester, Orchestra, MainArtist - Eike Boehm, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Toni Schlesinger, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Bernhard Guettler, Producer, Mixer, Editor, StudioPersonnel

℗ 2022 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

2
II. Andante con moto
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
00:11:06

Franz Schubert, Composer - René Möller, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Herbert Blomstedt, Conductor, MainArtist - Gewandhausorchester, Orchestra, MainArtist - Eike Boehm, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Toni Schlesinger, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Bernhard Guettler, Producer, Mixer, Editor, StudioPersonnel

℗ 2022 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

Symphony No. 9 in C major, D. 944 "The Great" (Franz Schubert)

3
I. Andante - Allegro ma non troppo
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
00:15:20

Franz Schubert, Composer - René Möller, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Herbert Blomstedt, Conductor, MainArtist - Gewandhausorchester, Orchestra, MainArtist - Eike Boehm, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Toni Schlesinger, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Bernhard Guettler, Producer, Mixer, Editor, StudioPersonnel

℗ 2022 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

4
II. Andante con moto
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
00:14:37

Franz Schubert, Composer - René Möller, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Herbert Blomstedt, Conductor, MainArtist - Gewandhausorchester, Orchestra, MainArtist - Eike Boehm, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Toni Schlesinger, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Bernhard Guettler, Producer, Mixer, Editor, StudioPersonnel

℗ 2022 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

5
III. Scherzo. Allegro vivace
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
00:15:10

Franz Schubert, Composer - René Möller, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Herbert Blomstedt, Conductor, MainArtist - Gewandhausorchester, Orchestra, MainArtist - Eike Boehm, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Toni Schlesinger, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Bernhard Guettler, Producer, Mixer, Editor, StudioPersonnel

℗ 2022 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

6
IV. Allegro vivace
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
00:16:22

Franz Schubert, Composer - René Möller, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Herbert Blomstedt, Conductor, MainArtist - Gewandhausorchester, Orchestra, MainArtist - Eike Boehm, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Toni Schlesinger, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Bernhard Guettler, Producer, Mixer, Editor, StudioPersonnel

℗ 2022 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

Album Description

Woe betide the music writer who alludes to "valedictory" recordings by conductor Herbert Blomstedt, who at age 95 makes his debut on the Deutsche Grammophon label (perhaps he didn't want to peak too soon there) with the orchestra that premiered Schubert's Symphony No. 9 in C major, D. 944, the Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig. The man is unstoppable, and though he has recorded these works before, these are not retreads of the earlier recordings. Blomstedt takes all the repeats (which he has not done in the past), posing a significant physical challenge to the players. Bernard Haitink famously said it would kill his musicians, and he wasn't going to do that, but with a 95-year-old on the podium, chugging along, who was going to ask for a break? In Blomstedt's big-boned interpretation, it works. Things get off to a quick start, partly because Blomstedt follows the now generally accepted cut time for the symphony's opening bars. He sustains the momentum through all the repeats, emphasizing the brass and looking toward the big hinges on which Schubert's structure rests. It's not that Blomstedt avoids lyricism; the second theme of the first movement in the "Unfinished" symphony yields to none in Viennese tunefulness, but the Symphony No. 9 in Blomstedt's hands is a vast canvas that looks toward the future. The sound from the Gewandhaus is another major attraction in a recording that fully takes its place in the orchestra's storied history.
© James Manheim /TiVo

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