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Vilde Frang - Nielsen: Violin Concerto Op. 33 / Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto Op. 35

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Nielsen: Violin Concerto Op. 33 / Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto Op. 35

Vilde Frang, Danish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Eivind Gullberg Jensen

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Langue disponible : anglais

Norwegian violinist Vilde Frang made her debut in 2010 with a pairing of concertos by Sibelius and Prokofiev. She repeats the formula here with works by Nielsen and Tchaikovsky, a somewhat risky move. But the fact is that she's exceptionally good in these repertories. Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, is in a way a work constrained by its tremendous virtuosity and the long performing tradition of which it is a part. It's hard to come up with something really new to say to it, but Frang makes a strong contribution with a graceful reading that avoids the tendency to push the big passages of the outer movement to a point just short of (or, in concert, just past) where a string breaks from the effort to get maximum volume out of it. Instead she favors detailed shaping of complicated stretches of passagework. It's quite distinctive, but the real news here is the Nielsen Violin Concerto, Op. 33, which had its premiere in 1912 and is not terribly often performed. It's a complex work in a mixture of idioms, from what annotator David Fanning calls neo-Baroque (actually much of it anticipates the sparkling neo-Mozartian language of the opera Maskarade), to developing figuration that anticipates the structures of Nielsen's symphonic works, to Tchaikovskian passages. These last help tie the program together in a novel way: how did Nielsen, a generation after Sibelius, react to the sounds of Tchaikovsky in his head? The Danish Radio Symphony Orchestra under Eivind Gullberg Jensen is not much more than workmanlike, but this is overall a fresh treatment of some highly familiar music and some that is less so.

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Nielsen: Violin Concerto Op. 33 / Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto Op. 35

Vilde Frang

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1
Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 35: I. Allegro moderato 00:18:34

Vilde Frang, Violin, MainArtist - Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Composer - Jørn Pedersen, Producer - Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jan Oldrup, Balance Engineer - Eivind Gullberg Jensen, Conductor

2012 EMI Records Ltd. 2012 Parlophone Records Limited, a Warner Music Group Company

2
Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 35: II. Canzonetta (Andante) 00:06:27

Vilde Frang, Violin, MainArtist - Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Composer - Jørn Pedersen, Producer - Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jan Oldrup, Balance Engineer - Eivind Gullberg Jensen, Conductor

2012 EMI Records Ltd. 2012 Warner Classics, Warner Music UK Ltd

3
Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 35: III. Finale (Allegro vivacissimo) 00:10:10

Vilde Frang, Violin, MainArtist - Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Composer - Jørn Pedersen, Producer - Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jan Oldrup, Balance Engineer - Eivind Gullberg Jensen, Conductor

2012 EMI Records Ltd. 2012 Warner Classics, Warner Music UK Ltd

4
Violin Concerto, Op. 33, FS 61: I. (a) Praeludium (Largo) 00:06:47

Vilde Frang, Violin - Carl Nielsen, Composer - Jørn Pedersen, Producer - Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jan Oldrup, Balance Engineer - Eivind Gullberg Jensen, Conductor - Vilde Frang/Eivind Gullberg Jensen/Danish National Symphony Orchestra, MainArtist

2012 EMI Records Ltd. 2012 Warner Classics, Warner Music UK Ltd

5
Violin Concerto, Op. 33, FS 61: I. (b) Allegro cavalleresco 00:13:10

Vilde Frang, Violin - Carl Nielsen, Composer - Jørn Pedersen, Producer - Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jan Oldrup, Balance Engineer - Eivind Gullberg Jensen, Conductor - Vilde Frang/Eivind Gullberg Jensen/Danish National Symphony Orchestra, MainArtist

2012 EMI Records Ltd. 2012 Warner Classics, Warner Music UK Ltd

6
Violin Concerto, Op. 33, FS 61: II. (a) Poco Adagio 00:06:15

Vilde Frang, Violin - Carl Nielsen, Composer - Jørn Pedersen, Producer - Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jan Oldrup, Balance Engineer - Eivind Gullberg Jensen, Conductor - Vilde Frang/Eivind Gullberg Jensen/Danish National Symphony Orchestra, MainArtist

2012 EMI Records Ltd. 2012 Warner Classics, Warner Music UK Ltd

7
Violin Concerto, Op. 33, FS 61: II. (b) Rondo (Allegretto scherzando) 00:10:26

Vilde Frang, Violin - Carl Nielsen, Composer - Jørn Pedersen, Producer - Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra - Jan Oldrup, Balance Engineer - Eivind Gullberg Jensen, Conductor - Vilde Frang/Eivind Gullberg Jensen/Danish National Symphony Orchestra, MainArtist

2012 EMI Records Ltd. 2012 Warner Classics, Warner Music UK Ltd

Album Description

Norwegian violinist Vilde Frang made her debut in 2010 with a pairing of concertos by Sibelius and Prokofiev. She repeats the formula here with works by Nielsen and Tchaikovsky, a somewhat risky move. But the fact is that she's exceptionally good in these repertories. Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, is in a way a work constrained by its tremendous virtuosity and the long performing tradition of which it is a part. It's hard to come up with something really new to say to it, but Frang makes a strong contribution with a graceful reading that avoids the tendency to push the big passages of the outer movement to a point just short of (or, in concert, just past) where a string breaks from the effort to get maximum volume out of it. Instead she favors detailed shaping of complicated stretches of passagework. It's quite distinctive, but the real news here is the Nielsen Violin Concerto, Op. 33, which had its premiere in 1912 and is not terribly often performed. It's a complex work in a mixture of idioms, from what annotator David Fanning calls neo-Baroque (actually much of it anticipates the sparkling neo-Mozartian language of the opera Maskarade), to developing figuration that anticipates the structures of Nielsen's symphonic works, to Tchaikovskian passages. These last help tie the program together in a novel way: how did Nielsen, a generation after Sibelius, react to the sounds of Tchaikovsky in his head? The Danish Radio Symphony Orchestra under Eivind Gullberg Jensen is not much more than workmanlike, but this is overall a fresh treatment of some highly familiar music and some that is less so.

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