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Teodor Currentzis - Mahler : Symphony No. 6

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Mahler : Symphony No. 6

MusicAeterna - Teodor Currentzis

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With Symphony No.6 in A Minor "Tragic" written in 1904 (the title, for once, is not a publisher's gimmick, but was indeed given by Mahler in the programme for the first performance in Vienna in 1906), Mahler almost returns to the classical symphony format; we find more voices in the score (a technique that he had already used in No. 5) and a four-movement structure (whereas No. 5 was articulated in five movements thrown into three "parts", with the absence of a programme or philosophical content). Admittedly, the orchestra remains huge, with four woodwinds, eight horns, and six trumpets, not to mention an impressive arsenal of percussion instruments including alpine bells, hammer and xylophone, which he never used elsewhere; in this respect, Mahler contributed to putting an end to the late romantic trend of gigantic works for titanic orchestras. It must be said that the last movement, which lasts at least half an hour, is of a truly tragic expression with its indelible darkness. This frightened the critics, who found the work somewhat bloated. It is therefore up to the conductor to make the score as transparent as possible, the contrapuntal lines readable and the orchestral colours perceptible through the orchestral immensity. Equipped with his MusicAeterna, Teorod Currentzis embarks on the adventure. © SM/Qobuz

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Mahler : Symphony No. 6

Teodor Currentzis

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Symphony No. 6 in A Minor (Gustav Mahler)

1
I. Allegro energico, ma non troppo 00:24:56

MusicAeterna - Teodor Currentzis, Conductor - Gustav Mahler, Composer - (Giovanni Prosdocimi, Producer - Damien Quintard, Recording Engineer)

© 2018 Sony Music Entertainment - ℗ 2018 Sony Music Entertainment

2
II. Scherzo 00:12:36

MusicAeterna - Teodor Currentzis, Conductor - Gustav Mahler, Composer - (Giovanni Prosdocimi, Producer - Damien Quintard, Recording Engineer)

© 2018 Sony Music Entertainment - ℗ 2018 Sony Music Entertainment

3
III. Andante moderato 00:15:39

MusicAeterna - Teodor Currentzis, Conductor - Gustav Mahler, Composer - (Giovanni Prosdocimi, Producer - Damien Quintard, Recording Engineer)

© 2018 Sony Music Entertainment - ℗ 2018 Sony Music Entertainment

4
IV. Finale. Sostenuto - Allegro moderato - Allegro energico 00:31:07

MusicAeterna - Teodor Currentzis, Conductor - Gustav Mahler, Composer - (Giovanni Prosdocimi, Producer - Damien Quintard, Recording Engineer)

© 2018 Sony Music Entertainment - ℗ 2018 Sony Music Entertainment

Album Description

With Symphony No.6 in A Minor "Tragic" written in 1904 (the title, for once, is not a publisher's gimmick, but was indeed given by Mahler in the programme for the first performance in Vienna in 1906), Mahler almost returns to the classical symphony format; we find more voices in the score (a technique that he had already used in No. 5) and a four-movement structure (whereas No. 5 was articulated in five movements thrown into three "parts", with the absence of a programme or philosophical content). Admittedly, the orchestra remains huge, with four woodwinds, eight horns, and six trumpets, not to mention an impressive arsenal of percussion instruments including alpine bells, hammer and xylophone, which he never used elsewhere; in this respect, Mahler contributed to putting an end to the late romantic trend of gigantic works for titanic orchestras. It must be said that the last movement, which lasts at least half an hour, is of a truly tragic expression with its indelible darkness. This frightened the critics, who found the work somewhat bloated. It is therefore up to the conductor to make the score as transparent as possible, the contrapuntal lines readable and the orchestral colours perceptible through the orchestral immensity. Equipped with his MusicAeterna, Teorod Currentzis embarks on the adventure. © SM/Qobuz

Details of original recording : Recorded at Dom Zvukozapisi (House of Audio Recording), Malaya Nikitskaya Street 24, Moscow, Russia, July 3–9, 2016

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