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Valery Gergiev|Mahler : Symphony No. 4 (HD)

Mahler : Symphony No. 4 (HD)

Valery Gergiev

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Gustav Mahler and the Munich Philharmonic share a very special connection. As a composer he sustainably linked the 19th century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. The world premiere of his Symphony No. 4 took place under his baton on 25 November 1901 in Munich’s Großen Kaim-Saal with the then called Kaim-Orchester, present day Munich Philharmonic. His works have been a substantial part of the Munich Philharmonic’s core repertoire ever since and the orchestra has excelled on many occasions. After the MPHIL release of Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 in September 2016 now follows the release of the Symphony No. 4 with which the orchestra’s history is so closely intertwined. The live concert recording released on this album took place at the Philharmonie im Gasteig in Munich, the orchestra’s home, with Salzburg soprano Genia Kuehmeier. Valery Gergiev has paid the Austro-German repertoire particular attention throughout his career, which ignited a lasting fascination for Gustav Mahler. Over recent decades he has continued to explore the Austro-German repertoire, garnering adulation, especially for his interpretations of Wagner, Strauss, Mahler and Bruckner – music that is at the very heart of the Munich Philharmonic’s repertoire. © Warner Classics

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Mahler : Symphony No. 4 (HD)

Valery Gergiev

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Symphony No. 4 in G major (Gustav Mahler)

1
I. Bedächtig, nicht eilen
Valery Gergiev
00:16:31

Münchner Philharmoniker - Valery Gergiev, Conductor - Gustav Mahler, Composer

© 2017 Münchner Philharmoniker ℗ 2017 Münchner Philharmoniker

2
II. In gemächlicher Bewegung
Valery Gergiev
00:10:17

Münchner Philharmoniker - Valery Gergiev, Conductor - Gustav Mahler, Composer

© 2017 Münchner Philharmoniker ℗ 2017 Münchner Philharmoniker

3
III. Ruhevoll, poco adagio
Valery Gergiev
00:19:53

Münchner Philharmoniker - Valery Gergiev, Conductor - Gustav Mahler, Composer

© 2017 Münchner Philharmoniker ℗ 2017 Münchner Philharmoniker

4
IV. Sehr behaglich, "Wir geniessen die himmlischen Freuden"
Genia Kuehmeier
00:09:58

Genia Kuehmeier, Soprano - Münchner Philharmoniker - Valery Gergiev, Conductor - Gustav Mahler, Composer

© 2017 Münchner Philharmoniker ℗ 2017 Münchner Philharmoniker

Album Description

Gustav Mahler and the Munich Philharmonic share a very special connection. As a composer he sustainably linked the 19th century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. The world premiere of his Symphony No. 4 took place under his baton on 25 November 1901 in Munich’s Großen Kaim-Saal with the then called Kaim-Orchester, present day Munich Philharmonic. His works have been a substantial part of the Munich Philharmonic’s core repertoire ever since and the orchestra has excelled on many occasions. After the MPHIL release of Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 in September 2016 now follows the release of the Symphony No. 4 with which the orchestra’s history is so closely intertwined. The live concert recording released on this album took place at the Philharmonie im Gasteig in Munich, the orchestra’s home, with Salzburg soprano Genia Kuehmeier. Valery Gergiev has paid the Austro-German repertoire particular attention throughout his career, which ignited a lasting fascination for Gustav Mahler. Over recent decades he has continued to explore the Austro-German repertoire, garnering adulation, especially for his interpretations of Wagner, Strauss, Mahler and Bruckner – music that is at the very heart of the Munich Philharmonic’s repertoire. © Warner Classics

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