Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Patricia Kopatchinskaja - Deux (Bartók, Poulenc & Ravel)

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Deux (Bartók, Poulenc & Ravel)

Patricia Kopatchinskaja, Polina Leschenko

Digital booklet

Available in
logo Hi-Res
24-Bit 96.0 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

The least that one could say about the art of Moldavian violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja is that one cannot be left indifferent by it - so completely does she set herself apart from her "smoother", more mainstream peers. One only needs to hear her explosive reading of Ravel's Tzigane, where she is particularly daring: the result is extravagant, but in reality, it is wholly in keeping with the spirit of this score, which too many violinists play prissily: after listening to this, you'll not want to hear it played any other way. Kopatchinskaja murmurs, rages, dreams, swoons, surges, explodes, caresses, grips, undulates, chirrups and slaps through the ten minutes of this humorous, provocative, bravura performance. Doubtless the serious Bartók wouldn't have relished Ravel's pseudo-Hungarian allusions - not understanding that the French composer was simply lampooning the Viennese pseudo-Hungarian-Tzigane style - going by his Second Sonata for Violin and Piano, which is both dogmatically Magyar and Bartókian, a rather gruff piece all in all. Much less gruff is the sumptuous Sonata by Poulenc, written in 1943 in a tone which is sometimes tragic - even if the facetious Poulenc undertakes his own personal Resistance by working into each of his three movements a quotation from Tea for Two, a song forbidden under the Occupation. Pianist Polia Leschenko offers the violinist a breather with the short but efficient waltz  Coppelia by Dohnanyi, a little Franco-Hungarian wink, a prelude to the big wink Tzigane, which crowns the album. © SM/Qobuz

More info

Deux (Bartók, Poulenc & Ravel)

Patricia Kopatchinskaja

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Violin Sonata, FP 119: I. Allegro con fuoco
Patricia Kopatchinskaja
00:06:09

Francis Poulenc, Composer - Polina Leschenko, MainArtist - Patricia Kopatchinskaja, MainArtist

2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France 2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France

2
Violin Sonata, FP 119: II. Intermezzo. Très lent et calme
Patricia Kopatchinskaja
00:05:51

Francis Poulenc, Composer - Polina Leschenko, MainArtist - Patricia Kopatchinskaja, MainArtist

2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France 2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France

3
Violin Sonata, FP 119: III. Presto tragico. Strictement la double plus lent
Patricia Kopatchinskaja
00:05:16

Francis Poulenc, Composer - Polina Leschenko, MainArtist - Patricia Kopatchinskaja, MainArtist

2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France 2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France

4
Coppélia: Waltz (Arr. for Piano by Ernst von Dohnányi)
Polina Leschenko
00:04:57

Léo Delibes, Composer - Polina Leschenko, MainArtist

2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France 2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France

5
Violin Sonata No. 2, Sz. 76: I. Molto moderato
Patricia Kopatchinskaja
00:08:40

Bela Bartok, Composer - Polina Leschenko, MainArtist - Patricia Kopatchinskaja, MainArtist

2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France 2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France

6
Violin Sonata No. 2, Sz. 76: II. Allegretto
Patricia Kopatchinskaja
00:11:49

Bela Bartok, Composer - Polina Leschenko, MainArtist - Patricia Kopatchinskaja, MainArtist

2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France 2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France

7
Tzigane, M. 76
Patricia Kopatchinskaja
00:10:09

Maurice Ravel, Composer - Polina Leschenko, MainArtist - Patricia Kopatchinskaja, MainArtist

2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France 2017 Alpha Classics / Outhere Music France

Album Description

The least that one could say about the art of Moldavian violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja is that one cannot be left indifferent by it - so completely does she set herself apart from her "smoother", more mainstream peers. One only needs to hear her explosive reading of Ravel's Tzigane, where she is particularly daring: the result is extravagant, but in reality, it is wholly in keeping with the spirit of this score, which too many violinists play prissily: after listening to this, you'll not want to hear it played any other way. Kopatchinskaja murmurs, rages, dreams, swoons, surges, explodes, caresses, grips, undulates, chirrups and slaps through the ten minutes of this humorous, provocative, bravura performance. Doubtless the serious Bartók wouldn't have relished Ravel's pseudo-Hungarian allusions - not understanding that the French composer was simply lampooning the Viennese pseudo-Hungarian-Tzigane style - going by his Second Sonata for Violin and Piano, which is both dogmatically Magyar and Bartókian, a rather gruff piece all in all. Much less gruff is the sumptuous Sonata by Poulenc, written in 1943 in a tone which is sometimes tragic - even if the facetious Poulenc undertakes his own personal Resistance by working into each of his three movements a quotation from Tea for Two, a song forbidden under the Occupation. Pianist Polia Leschenko offers the violinist a breather with the short but efficient waltz  Coppelia by Dohnanyi, a little Franco-Hungarian wink, a prelude to the big wink Tzigane, which crowns the album. © SM/Qobuz

About the album

Distinctions:

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Debussy – Rameau

Víkingur Ólafsson

Debussy – Rameau Víkingur Ólafsson

The Köln Concert (Live at the Opera, Köln, 1975)

Keith Jarrett

Philip Glass: Piano Works

Víkingur Ólafsson

Philip Glass: Piano Works Víkingur Ólafsson

Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No.3 / Ravel: Piano Concerto In G Major

Martha Argerich

More on Qobuz
By Patricia Kopatchinskaja

Francisco Coll: Orchestral Works

Patricia Kopatchinskaja

Francisco Coll: Orchestral Works Patricia Kopatchinskaja

What's Next Vivaldi?

Patricia Kopatchinskaja

What's Next Vivaldi? Patricia Kopatchinskaja

Plaisirs illuminés

Patricia Kopatchinskaja

Plaisirs illuminés Patricia Kopatchinskaja

Schubert: Death and the Maiden

Patricia Kopatchinskaja

Schubert: Death and the Maiden Patricia Kopatchinskaja

Time & Eternity

Patricia Kopatchinskaja

Time & Eternity Patricia Kopatchinskaja
You may also like...

Brahms: Viola Sonatas, Op. 120 - Zwei Gesänge, Op. 91

Antoine Tamestit

Entre Orient & Occident

Virgil Boutellis-Taft

Entre Orient & Occident Virgil Boutellis-Taft

Gade: Sonatas for Violin and Piano

Christina Åstrand

Six Evolutions - Bach: Cello Suites

Yo-Yo Ma

Bach: Little Books

Francesco Corti

Bach: Little Books Francesco Corti
In your panoramas...
François Couperin, the modern harpsichord

A favourite of Louis XIV, François Couperin (1668-1733) was the harpsichord superstar of the 18th century. At the time, the harpsichord was a prestigious instrument which was at the height of its fame (although it would return to obscurity in the following century), and Couperin revolutionised the way it was played, breaking a path that would later be trod by other virtuosos of the period like Dandrieu or Rameau. The Quebecois harpsichordist Olivier Fortin tells Qobuz the story of "Couperin the Great".

Jordi Savall: Music, life and recording

It was a rainy October night in the Bugey. On October nights, it's always raining in the Bugey. It was around midnight. There were fifty of us, waiting in the cold, the wet and the rapt silence at the Ambronay Festival. All of a sudden, and without a sound, Jordi Savall was there, sopping wet in a white raincoat, like Bogart in Casablanca, holding onto a hard case shaped like a human body. Moving slowly, he drew out not a person but a viola de gamba, which he started tuning and stringing with the greatest care. And then the miracle descended upon the auditorium.

Mason Bates' weird and wonderful electronic symphonies

What do you mean, you haven’t heard about Mason Bates (yet)? He is one of the hottest names on the North-American music scene. Born in 1977, Bates is a symphonic and lyrical composer as well as an electro DJ (under the alias DJ Masonic) – two completely opposing genres which he takes great delight in mixing. Around half of his symphonic and lyrical work consists, in one way or another, of electronic sounds. The majority of these sounds are “every day sounds”, which are prerecorded and later put into a score. On the release date of his brilliant opera The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs, Qobuz interviewed this extraordinary person.

In the news...