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The Flaming Lips - American Head

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American Head

The Flaming Lips

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The Flaming Lips' catalog includes songs about pink robots invading the planet and drummer Steven Drozd's lie about a staph infection in his hand (it was heroin-related, not a spider bite). But the band may have topped their usual out-there factor with American Head, their 16th album. Written after the 2017 death of Tom Petty, it's a fantasy concept: imagined lost songs recorded by Petty and his early '70s band Mudcrutch, if they'd taken drugs supplied by Lips frontman Wayne Coyne's brother's drug-dealing friends. It also weaves in Coyne's own memories of his youth in Tulsa, OK. If you can suspend your disbelief—and if you're listening to a Flaming Lips record, that likely isn't a problem—it's a free-floating trip of spaced-out bliss. All that floatiness means it's not their catchiest (and this is a band capable of writing a killer hook). But it is lovely, laden with emotionally charged strings and Drozd's commanding percussion. "Will You Return When You Come Down" layers dreamy harmonies and lush piano with earthy guitar and Coyne's trademark wavering warble. "Flowers of Neptune 6" is a hazy celebration of acid experimentation. Admitted LSD fan Kacey Musgraves lends guest vocals to that track as well as "Watching the Light-bugs Glow"; low in the mix, she can be heard talking about one of her own trips. There are two truly epic moments. "Mother I've Taken LSD" is a Syd Barrett-esque ballad—majestic drums, sweeping strings—about Coyne's older brother telling their mom he'd taken acid, and how much this scared a young Coyne. "Mother Please Don't Be Sad" is about Coyne working as a fry cook at Long John Silver's and being held up at gunpoint—and imagining his mom getting the news that he'd died. And it is, against all odds, absolutely gorgeous. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz

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American Head

The Flaming Lips

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1
Will You Return/When You Come Down
00:05:21

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist - Particle Kid, FeaturedArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

2
Watching The Lightbugs Glow
00:02:53

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

3
Flowers Of Neptune 6
00:04:30

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

4
Dinosaurs On The Mountain
00:03:38

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

5
At The Movies On Quaaludes
00:03:41

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

6
Mother I've Taken LSD
00:03:48

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

7
Brother Eye
00:04:23

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

8
You N Me Sellin' Weed
00:04:56

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

9
Mother Please Don't Be Sad
00:03:35

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

10
When We Die When We're High
00:03:39

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

11
Assassins Of Youth
00:04:12

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

12
God And The Policeman
00:02:28

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist - Kacey Musgraves, FeaturedArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

13
My Religion Is You
00:03:33

The Flaming Lips, Composer, MainArtist

2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union 2020 The Flaming Lips, Under License to Bella Union

Album Description

The Flaming Lips' catalog includes songs about pink robots invading the planet and drummer Steven Drozd's lie about a staph infection in his hand (it was heroin-related, not a spider bite). But the band may have topped their usual out-there factor with American Head, their 16th album. Written after the 2017 death of Tom Petty, it's a fantasy concept: imagined lost songs recorded by Petty and his early '70s band Mudcrutch, if they'd taken drugs supplied by Lips frontman Wayne Coyne's brother's drug-dealing friends. It also weaves in Coyne's own memories of his youth in Tulsa, OK. If you can suspend your disbelief—and if you're listening to a Flaming Lips record, that likely isn't a problem—it's a free-floating trip of spaced-out bliss. All that floatiness means it's not their catchiest (and this is a band capable of writing a killer hook). But it is lovely, laden with emotionally charged strings and Drozd's commanding percussion. "Will You Return When You Come Down" layers dreamy harmonies and lush piano with earthy guitar and Coyne's trademark wavering warble. "Flowers of Neptune 6" is a hazy celebration of acid experimentation. Admitted LSD fan Kacey Musgraves lends guest vocals to that track as well as "Watching the Light-bugs Glow"; low in the mix, she can be heard talking about one of her own trips. There are two truly epic moments. "Mother I've Taken LSD" is a Syd Barrett-esque ballad—majestic drums, sweeping strings—about Coyne's older brother telling their mom he'd taken acid, and how much this scared a young Coyne. "Mother Please Don't Be Sad" is about Coyne working as a fry cook at Long John Silver's and being held up at gunpoint—and imagining his mom getting the news that he'd died. And it is, against all odds, absolutely gorgeous. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz

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