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Pop - Paru le 13 juillet 2004 | Morr Music

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Électronique - Paru le 13 juillet 2004 | Morr Music

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Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 20 mai 2002 | Fatcat Records

Finally We Are No One est le second album de Mùm. Plus que le sacro-sain « album de la maturité », il faut le voir comme l’album de la confirmation, puisque, sorti sur le label Fat Cat Records en 2002, il est celui qui leur a conféré une place de choix dans le paysage déjà coloré de la musique islandaise. Les petits cousins de Sigur Ros passent donc dans la cour des grands et ne déméritent pas. Mùm propose une pop électronique à la fois douce et légère, presque enfantine, et pourtant dotée d’une vraie personnalité. Les membres du groupe avouent d’ailleurs avoir un rapport très ludique à la composition « Behind Two Hills, a Swimming Pool » ou la féerique « Faraway Swimming pool »  le prouvent.Mais même minimalistes, les trouvailles mélodiques traduisent ici un effort de Mùm pour construire et faire tenir certains morceaux comme des entités indépendantes, plutôt que comme des pistes d’expérimentations. Ainsi peut-on même parler de « chanson », à l’écoute de « We Have a Map of The Piano » portées par les voix éthérés des sœurs Valtysdóttir.Finalement, Finally We Are No One est un excellent album de découverte, que l’on préfère le groupe Mùm dans ce qu’il a de plus hors normes, non-conventionnel, ou bien lorsqu’il tente une approche plus « pop » et se rend donc plus accessible. © ©Copyright Music Story Anne Yven 2021
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Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 15 mars 2004 | Fatcat Records

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Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 4 mai 2004 | Fatcat Records

After the pastoral pop of Finally We Are No One, Múm returned with Summer Make Good, which continues the more organic-sounding trend of the group's previous album, but with a darker and more theatrical feel than any of their other work. "Hú Hviss - A Ship" lasts scarcely more than a minute, but it signals the rest of the album's spooky beauty with a soundscape of wind, creaking wood, and what might as well be whale songs. The album has a sense of drama that is a welcome addition to Múm's sound, especially on "Weeping Rock, Rock," a slow-building epic that makes the most of the electronic-meets-symphonic sound that the band has forged since Yesterday Was Dramatic -- Today Is OK. The song's brass, powerful but intricate drums, and focus on Kristín Anna Valtýsdóttir's distinctive, childlike voice won't diminish the comparisons between Múm and Björk, especially since Múm has made vocals a bigger part of their music with each release. However, Múm's music is more organic and delicate than Björk's is, and Valtýsdóttir's voice is far more ethereal and diffuse. Indeed, her singing is so delicate that the group's decision to emphasize it doesn't always lead to immediately compelling results. That's not to say tracks such as "The Ghosts You Draw on My Back" aren't lovely, but instrumental pieces like the Broadcast-esque "Away" and "Stir," which sounds like eddies of wind chasing each other, tend to be more arresting on first listen. The songs that use Valtýsdóttir's voice as another instrument, including the return to Yesterday Was Dramatic -- Today Is OK-style electronica of "Sing Me Out the Window," also work well. Summer Make Good's melancholy lifts a bit in the middle of the album on the angel-spun "The Islands of the Childrens Children," a gorgeous song that takes the joyful feeling of Finally We Are No One and multiplies it by ten. It makes the song an even sharper contrast to the rest of the album's gentle sadness, which peaks on "Oh, How the Boat Drifts" and the eerily lovely "Will the Summer Make Good for All of Our Sins?" Summer Make Good may be Múm's quietest and most impressionistic album yet; what they're able to do with silence and near-silence is impressive, particularly on the serene, softly rounded "Nightly Cares" and "Abandoned Ship Bells," which drifts the album to a close. Its quietness and moodiness make Summer Make Good Múm's most demanding album, but also, fortunately, a rewarding one too. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 14 septembre 2004 | Fatcat Records

Dusk Log features four songs that are in keeping with the more organic sound of Múm's previous full-length, Summer Make Good. Tracks such as "Kostrzyn" rely even more heavily on acoustic instrumentation -- in this case, rousing horns and strings -- despite the skittering beats and bloopy synths around their peripheries. This song and "This Nothing in the Faraway" are decidedly more tossed-off than anything on the sometimes overdone Summer Make Good, but that's part of their charm, and their cheerier sound makes the EP a more instantly engaging listen than the album was. Dusk Log's immediacy also, arguably, makes a better setting for "Will the Summer Make Good for All of Our Sins?"'s fairytale-like mix of whimsical beauty and potentially dangerous strangeness. The EP comes to a close with "Boots of Fog," one of the most abstract tracks Múm has done in a while: scratchy noises and snippets of melodies drift in and out, and Kristín Anna Valtýsdóttir's vocals pile on top of each other, resulting in fractured, dreamlike folk. The song, like the rest of Dusk Log, is a compact reminder of how good Múm is at hazy, sketchy outlines and intricate sonic doodles. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Électronique - Paru le 1 juin 2005 | klein records

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Électronique - Paru le 1 juin 2005 | klein records

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Électronique - Paru le 1 juin 2005 | klein records

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Électronique - Paru le 1 juin 2005 | klein records

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Ambient - Paru le 4 octobre 2005 | Morr Music

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Électronique - Paru le 26 août 2007 | [PIAS] Recordings Catalogue

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Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 23 septembre 2007 | [PIAS] Recordings Catalogue

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Électronique - Paru le 14 décembre 2007 | [PIAS] Recordings

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Électronique - Paru le 14 décembre 2007 | [PIAS] Recordings Catalogue

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Électronique - Paru le 21 août 2009 | Morr Music

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Pop - Paru le 2 octobre 2009 | Morr Music

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Rock - Paru le 4 mai 2004 | Fatcat Records

After the pastoral pop of Finally We Are No One, Múm returned with Summer Make Good, which continues the more organic-sounding trend of the group's previous album, but with a darker and more theatrical feel than any of their other work. "Hú Hviss - A Ship" lasts scarcely more than a minute, but it signals the rest of the album's spooky beauty with a soundscape of wind, creaking wood, and what might as well be whale songs. The album has a sense of drama that is a welcome addition to Múm's sound, especially on "Weeping Rock, Rock," a slow-building epic that makes the most of the electronic-meets-symphonic sound that the band has forged since Yesterday Was Dramatic -- Today Is OK. The song's brass, powerful but intricate drums, and focus on Kristín Anna Valtýsdóttir's distinctive, childlike voice won't diminish the comparisons between Múm and Björk, especially since Múm has made vocals a bigger part of their music with each release. However, Múm's music is more organic and delicate than Björk's is, and Valtýsdóttir's voice is far more ethereal and diffuse. Indeed, her singing is so delicate that the group's decision to emphasize it doesn't always lead to immediately compelling results. That's not to say tracks such as "The Ghosts You Draw on My Back" aren't lovely, but instrumental pieces like the Broadcast-esque "Away" and "Stir," which sounds like eddies of wind chasing each other, tend to be more arresting on first listen. The songs that use Valtýsdóttir's voice as another instrument, including the return to Yesterday Was Dramatic -- Today Is OK-style electronica of "Sing Me Out the Window," also work well. Summer Make Good's melancholy lifts a bit in the middle of the album on the angel-spun "The Islands of the Childrens Children," a gorgeous song that takes the joyful feeling of Finally We Are No One and multiplies it by ten. It makes the song an even sharper contrast to the rest of the album's gentle sadness, which peaks on "Oh, How the Boat Drifts" and the eerily lovely "Will the Summer Make Good for All of Our Sins?" Summer Make Good may be Múm's quietest and most impressionistic album yet; what they're able to do with silence and near-silence is impressive, particularly on the serene, softly rounded "Nightly Cares" and "Abandoned Ship Bells," which drifts the album to a close. Its quietness and moodiness make Summer Make Good Múm's most demanding album, but also, fortunately, a rewarding one too. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Rock - Paru le 1 juillet 2011 | Fatcat Records

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Rock - Paru le 14 septembre 2004 | Fatcat Records

Dusk Log features four songs that are in keeping with the more organic sound of Múm's previous full-length, Summer Make Good. Tracks such as "Kostrzyn" rely even more heavily on acoustic instrumentation -- in this case, rousing horns and strings -- despite the skittering beats and bloopy synths around their peripheries. This song and "This Nothing in the Faraway" are decidedly more tossed-off than anything on the sometimes overdone Summer Make Good, but that's part of their charm, and their cheerier sound makes the EP a more instantly engaging listen than the album was. Dusk Log's immediacy also, arguably, makes a better setting for "Will the Summer Make Good for All of Our Sins?"'s fairytale-like mix of whimsical beauty and potentially dangerous strangeness. The EP comes to a close with "Boots of Fog," one of the most abstract tracks Múm has done in a while: scratchy noises and snippets of melodies drift in and out, and Kristín Anna Valtýsdóttir's vocals pile on top of each other, resulting in fractured, dreamlike folk. The song, like the rest of Dusk Log, is a compact reminder of how good Múm is at hazy, sketchy outlines and intricate sonic doodles. © Heather Phares /TiVo