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Don't You Want Me

Human League

Dance - Released November 19, 2021 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Don't You Want Me

Human League

Dance - Released November 19, 2021 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Peace Or Love

Kings Of Convenience

Pop - Released June 18, 2021 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Though they never really went away, emerging for the occasional live performance or an ill-fated start at an album, Kings of Convenience -- the Norwegian duo of singer/guitarists Erik Glambek Bøe and Erlend Øye -- nonetheless ended up with a 12-year gap between their Billboard 200-charting fourth album (depending on how you count), Declaration of Dependence, and 2021's Peace or Love. The project's gentle, acoustic-centered approach and sophisticated harmonic textures don't skip a beat, however, on a set that connects the dots between wistful indie pop, airy, syncopated bossa nova, and singer/songwriter folk traditions. Some of the album's standouts include the warm, silky bossa outing "Angel," an eyebrow-raising, whispery ode to an object of affection ("Though she might be/Just slightly/Promiscuous"). The more somber opener "Rumours" showcases the duo's elegant vocal harmonies, while the melancholy, uncertain "Killers" relies on a solo vocal over their interlaced fingerstyle guitar lines. These are further highlighted by pair of duets with Feist; the spacious "Love Is a Lonely Thing" dispenses with vulnerable relationship advice as the singers trade lines, only coming together for the words "Once you've known that magic/Who can live without it?" Later, "Catholic Country," which was co-written with the Staves, offers further Gilberto-inspired stylings and a brisker tempo on a duet softly fleshed out by piano and percussion. While Kings of Convenience don't cover fresh territory with Peace or Love, they do what they do as impeccably as ever here and offer a handful of changeups and hummable tunes along the way. It should serve as a welcome return for any established fans. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Peace Or Love

Kings Of Convenience

Pop - Released June 18, 2021 | Virgin Records Ltd

Though they never really went away, emerging for the occasional live performance or an ill-fated start at an album, Kings of Convenience -- the Norwegian duo of singer/guitarists Erik Glambek Bøe and Erlend Øye -- nonetheless ended up with a 12-year gap between their Billboard 200-charting fourth album (depending on how you count), Declaration of Dependence, and 2021's Peace or Love. The project's gentle, acoustic-centered approach and sophisticated harmonic textures don't skip a beat, however, on a set that connects the dots between wistful indie pop, airy, syncopated bossa nova, and singer/songwriter folk traditions. Some of the album's standouts include the warm, silky bossa outing "Angel," an eyebrow-raising, whispery ode to an object of affection ("Though she might be/Just slightly/Promiscuous"). The more somber opener "Rumours" showcases the duo's elegant vocal harmonies, while the melancholy, uncertain "Killers" relies on a solo vocal over their interlaced fingerstyle guitar lines. These are further highlighted by pair of duets with Feist; the spacious "Love Is a Lonely Thing" dispenses with vulnerable relationship advice as the singers trade lines, only coming together for the words "Once you've known that magic/Who can live without it?" Later, "Catholic Country," which was co-written with the Staves, offers further Gilberto-inspired stylings and a brisker tempo on a duet softly fleshed out by piano and percussion. While Kings of Convenience don't cover fresh territory with Peace or Love, they do what they do as impeccably as ever here and offer a handful of changeups and hummable tunes along the way. It should serve as a welcome return for any established fans. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Fever

Kings Of Convenience

Pop - Released May 28, 2021 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Rocky Trail

Kings Of Convenience

Pop - Released April 30, 2021 | Virgin Records Ltd

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I’ll Get There (The Other Side)

Emeli Sandé

Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | Virgin Records Ltd

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I’ll Get There (The Other Side)

Emeli Sandé

Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Live Before I Die

Naughty Boy

Pop - Released November 15, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Live Before I Die

Naughty Boy

Pop - Released November 15, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Doom Days

Bastille

Alternative & Indie - Released April 25, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd

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After confronting global corruption on 2016's Wild World, it's only natural that the men of Bastille would feel the need for escape that they express on Doom Days. It's as necessary to take moments to just exist as it is to resist the world's injustices, and the band's third album follows a night out with friends and possible lovers, from singing along with the radio on the way to the party to waking up on the floor the next morning. However, their attempts to ignore the world around them on Doom Days are even more relatable because they can't shut it out entirely. "We never knew what we had," Dan Smith sings on "Quarter Past Midnight," capturing the way it's possible to be nostalgic for a moment before it has passed. Though Bastille's choruses are as rousing as ever, on this song and throughout the album there's a newfound intimacy to their music as they explore everyday loneliness and hope in a time of crisis. On the title track, Smith recites a litany of 2010s disasters ("I'm livestreaming the final days of Rome" once again harks back to the band's smash hit "Pompeii"), but chooses to stay present instead of worrying about the latest bad news. Similarly, the celebratory pulse of "Nocturnal Creatures" reaffirms that good times shine all the brighter when people live in the constant shadow of something ominous. Thanks to its concept, Doom Days is easily the group's most cohesive album yet, but as they tighten their focus, they also expand their sound. Alongside quintessentially heartfelt Bastille songs like "Another Place" are tracks such as "4AM," which moves from a cozy acoustic singalong to brass and beats with the seamless flow of their mixtapes, and "Million Pieces," which sets Doom Days' escapist heights to rhythms that evoke '90s garage. On "Joy," the band draws on the power of a gospel choir to give the album a happy ending that feels well-earned, even if it's only temporary. This need to seize the moment has been one of Bastille's main messages since "Pompeii," and with Doom Days, they prove they can deliver it in increasingly eloquent and relatable ways. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Doom Days

Bastille

Alternative & Indie - Released April 25, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd

After confronting global corruption on 2016's Wild World, it's only natural that the men of Bastille would feel the need for escape that they express on Doom Days. It's as necessary to take moments to just exist as it is to resist the world's injustices, and the band's third album follows a night out with friends and possible lovers, from singing along with the radio on the way to the party to waking up on the floor the next morning. However, their attempts to ignore the world around them on Doom Days are even more relatable because they can't shut it out entirely. "We never knew what we had," Dan Smith sings on "Quarter Past Midnight," capturing the way it's possible to be nostalgic for a moment before it has passed. Though Bastille's choruses are as rousing as ever, on this song and throughout the album there's a newfound intimacy to their music as they explore everyday loneliness and hope in a time of crisis. On the title track, Smith recites a litany of 2010s disasters ("I'm livestreaming the final days of Rome" once again harks back to the band's smash hit "Pompeii"), but chooses to stay present instead of worrying about the latest bad news. Similarly, the celebratory pulse of "Nocturnal Creatures" reaffirms that good times shine all the brighter when people live in the constant shadow of something ominous. Thanks to its concept, Doom Days is easily the group's most cohesive album yet, but as they tighten their focus, they also expand their sound. Alongside quintessentially heartfelt Bastille songs like "Another Place" are tracks such as "4AM," which moves from a cozy acoustic singalong to brass and beats with the seamless flow of their mixtapes, and "Million Pieces," which sets Doom Days' escapist heights to rhythms that evoke '90s garage. On "Joy," the band draws on the power of a gospel choir to give the album a happy ending that feels well-earned, even if it's only temporary. This need to seize the moment has been one of Bastille's main messages since "Pompeii," and with Doom Days, they prove they can deliver it in increasingly eloquent and relatable ways. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Doom Days

Bastille

Alternative & Indie - Released June 14, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd

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After confronting global corruption on 2016's Wild World, it's only natural that the men of Bastille would feel the need for escape that they express on Doom Days. It's as necessary to take moments to just exist as it is to resist the world's injustices, and the band's third album follows a night out with friends and possible lovers, from singing along with the radio on the way to the party to waking up on the floor the next morning. However, their attempts to ignore the world around them on Doom Days are even more relatable because they can't shut it out entirely. "We never knew what we had," Dan Smith sings on "Quarter Past Midnight," capturing the way it's possible to be nostalgic for a moment before it has passed. Though Bastille's choruses are as rousing as ever, on this song and throughout the album there's a newfound intimacy to their music as they explore everyday loneliness and hope in a time of crisis. On the title track, Smith recites a litany of 2010s disasters ("I'm livestreaming the final days of Rome" once again harks back to the band's smash hit "Pompeii"), but chooses to stay present instead of worrying about the latest bad news. Similarly, the celebratory pulse of "Nocturnal Creatures" reaffirms that good times shine all the brighter when people live in the constant shadow of something ominous. Thanks to its concept, Doom Days is easily the group's most cohesive album yet, but as they tighten their focus, they also expand their sound. Alongside quintessentially heartfelt Bastille songs like "Another Place" are tracks such as "4AM," which moves from a cozy acoustic singalong to brass and beats with the seamless flow of their mixtapes, and "Million Pieces," which sets Doom Days' escapist heights to rhythms that evoke '90s garage. On "Joy," the band draws on the power of a gospel choir to give the album a happy ending that feels well-earned, even if it's only temporary. This need to seize the moment has been one of Bastille's main messages since "Pompeii," and with Doom Days, they prove they can deliver it in increasingly eloquent and relatable ways. © Heather Phares /TiVo
From
CD$26.99

Doom Days

Bastille

Alternative & Indie - Released June 14, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd

After confronting global corruption on 2016's Wild World, it's only natural that the men of Bastille would feel the need for escape that they express on Doom Days. It's as necessary to take moments to just exist as it is to resist the world's injustices, and the band's third album follows a night out with friends and possible lovers, from singing along with the radio on the way to the party to waking up on the floor the next morning. However, their attempts to ignore the world around them on Doom Days are even more relatable because they can't shut it out entirely. "We never knew what we had," Dan Smith sings on "Quarter Past Midnight," capturing the way it's possible to be nostalgic for a moment before it has passed. Though Bastille's choruses are as rousing as ever, on this song and throughout the album there's a newfound intimacy to their music as they explore everyday loneliness and hope in a time of crisis. On the title track, Smith recites a litany of 2010s disasters ("I'm livestreaming the final days of Rome" once again harks back to the band's smash hit "Pompeii"), but chooses to stay present instead of worrying about the latest bad news. Similarly, the celebratory pulse of "Nocturnal Creatures" reaffirms that good times shine all the brighter when people live in the constant shadow of something ominous. Thanks to its concept, Doom Days is easily the group's most cohesive album yet, but as they tighten their focus, they also expand their sound. Alongside quintessentially heartfelt Bastille songs like "Another Place" are tracks such as "4AM," which moves from a cozy acoustic singalong to brass and beats with the seamless flow of their mixtapes, and "Million Pieces," which sets Doom Days' escapist heights to rhythms that evoke '90s garage. On "Joy," the band draws on the power of a gospel choir to give the album a happy ending that feels well-earned, even if it's only temporary. This need to seize the moment has been one of Bastille's main messages since "Pompeii," and with Doom Days, they prove they can deliver it in increasingly eloquent and relatable ways. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Can’t Fight This Feeling

Bastille

Alternative & Indie - Released November 19, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Can’t Fight This Feeling

Bastille

Alternative & Indie - Released November 19, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Live Before I Die

Naughty Boy

Pop - Released November 15, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Another Place

Bastille

Alternative & Indie - Released November 1, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Million Pieces

Bastille

Alternative & Indie - Released September 27, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd

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Honest

Emeli Sandé

Pop - Released September 10, 2019 | Virgin Records Ltd