Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
HI-RES$110.29
CD$84.79

Soul - To be released July 30, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$50.79
CD$54.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 23, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
From
CD$2.99

Rock - Released July 23, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
CD$2.99

Jazz - Released July 16, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
CD$2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released July 9, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
HI-RES$17.29
CD$14.79

Soul - Released June 25, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
Coming as it did on the heels of Roberta Flack's groundbreaking First Take debut, and devoid of any iconic tracks like that set's "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face," Chapter Two has long suffered from an undeserved lack of attention that's made it seem like something of a sophomore slump in this legendary singer's catalog. Nothing could be further from the truth. Chapter Two is one of the rawest and most effective demonstrations of Flack's incomparable voice and her equally impressive taste in material and presentation. Opening with the defiantly and intensely sensual "Reverend Lee"—in which Flack deftly threads the needle between sacred and profane—Chapter Two immediately seeks to stake a claim beyond the more genteel and cosmopolitan approach of its predecessor. If First Take was a soulful take on jazz vocals, Chapter Two sets out to explore the bluesier side of that style. Although it exists in a similarly lush milieu, with plenty of horn and string arrangements, Chapter Two is simultaneously more restrained and understated, with a sense of spacious atmospherics and liminal implications; both Flack's voice and the accompanying instrumentation seem as attuned to the sound between the notes as they are to the expertly crafted harmonies and melodies in the foreground. Perhaps this is due to the upgrade in collaborators; those arrangements were all handled by William S. Fischer on First Take, but on Chapter Two, a team of four arrangers is on hand, with Eumir Deodato handling strings and horns, while Donny Hathaway (who also contributes piano) and co-producers King Curtis and Joel Dorn oversee the whole affair. Even the most robustly constructed songs—a slow-galloping take on Jimmy Webb's "Do What You Gotta Do," an appropriately melodramatic version of "The Impossible Dream," a gut-wrenchingly climatic interpretation of the Impressions' "Gone Away"—have an almost ephemeral quality as the production manages to not so much "put you in the room with the performance" as it amplifies the ethereal collision of sophistication and soulfulness that gives these songs so much life. This warmly remastered 50th Anniversary Edition tacks on just one bonus track, but it's a doozy: an incredible version of Joni Mitchell's rejected theme for Midnight Cowboy, a song which is otherwise unreleased except for a version that Flack produced for soul singer Donal Leace's 1972 Atlantic album. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
From
HI-RES$23.29
CD$20.29

Soul - Released June 25, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
Quiet Fire proves to be an apt title, as Flack's MOR-informed jazz and gospel vocals simmer just below the surface on the eight sides here. Forgoing the full-throttled delivery of, say, Aretha Franklin, Flack translates the pathos of gospel expression into measured intensity and sighing, elongated phrases. There's even a bit of Carole King's ashen tone in Flack's voice, as manifested on songs like "Let Them Talk," Van McCoy's "Sweet Bitter Love," and a meditative reworking of King's "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow." The album's other high-profile cover, "Bridge Over Troubled Waters," features the ideal setting for Flack's airy pipes with a tasteful backdrop of strings and a chorus featuring soul songstress Cissy Houston (Whitney's mom). Switching from this hushed sanctity, Flack digs into some groove-heavy southern soul on "Go Up Moses," "Sunday and Sister Jones," and an amazing version of the Bee Gees hit "To Love Somebody" (this perennial number has been done by everyone from Rita Marley to Hank Williams, Jr.). Flack finally completes the modern triumvirate of southern music, adding the country tones of Jimmy Webb's "See You Then" to the Quiet Fire's stock of gospel and soul. And thanks to top players like guitarist Hugh McCracken, organist Richard Tee, bassist Chuck Rainey, and drummer Bernard Purdie, the varied mix all comes off sounding seamless. One of Flack's best. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
From
HI-RES$23.29
CD$20.29

Pop - Released June 25, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
From
CD$2.99

Soul - Released June 23, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
CD$12.29

Jazz - Released June 11, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

Fascinating snapshots of musical evolution, live jazz albums capture improvisation as it happens. Famed as a "battle of the saxes," this set by the inimitable composer/bassist/bandleader Charles Mingus and his working sextet was originally released as a single disc, containing only the two long jams on the Duke Ellington standards, "Perdido" and "C Jam Blues" that closed the show. The reasons why the opening four tracks of that January 19, 1974 concert—"Peggy's Blue Skylight," "Celia" "Fables of Faubus" and "Big Alice"—were left unreleased until now remain unknown. Most likely it was the fear that a double LP would never sell. (But one with a pair of 20-minute tracks would?) The four songs (and spoken introduction) that were the first half of the concert have now been restored and are a welcome addition to the Mingus canon. Always a magnet for great talent because of his prolific composing and expansive artistic vision, the bassist here leads his spry working sextet of Don Pullen (piano), George Adams (tenor saxophone), Jon Faddis (trumpet), Hamiet Bluiett (baritone saxophone) and Dannie Richmond (drums). Those robust instrumental voices are reinforced in the two Ellington numbers by Charles McPherson (alto saxophone), John Handy (alto & tenor saxophone) and the ever-amazing Rahsaan Roland Kirk (on tenor saxophone and a straight alto sax he called stritch). Despite the age of the original tapes, the ringing, uncomplicated sound here makes Carnegie Hall's famous acoustics vividly audible. As live recordings go, the uncredited mix engineer did a fabulous job of balancing all the horns while never allowing Pullen's piano nor Mingus' bass to slide entirely into the background. The new remastering has brought out a brighter, more dynamic sonic image. The Mingus compositions heard in the first half are all classic examples of his swing and bebop-influenced devotion to melody counterbalanced by a rhythmic vitality that's unique in jazz. In opener "Peggy's Blue Skylight," each member glides through their solos with great elan. In "Celia" a tune named for the bassist's wife at the time, cacophony unravels into bravura passages with an expansive big band feel. Pianist Pullen is the star of "Fables of Faubus." Closing what was the original first set, Pullen's "Big Alice" is a funky, joyous, almost Second Line romp with Adams, Bluiett and Faddis all chipping in raucous solos. The much-ballyhooed sax fray on the pair of Ellington standards is a Fourth of July explosion of horn madness, playful and serious, squonking and legato, highlighted again by marvelous energetic solos by Kirk that at one point sound like an oncoming locomotive. Still not as essential as many of his studio albums, the story of this concert is now at least rightly told from the beginning instead of the end. © Robert Baird/Qobuz
From
CD$2.99

Rock - Released June 8, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
CD$2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 21, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
HI-RES$68.99
CD$63.59

Rock - Released May 14, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res
During the era in which even grocery stores had large, well-stocked LP sections, it was a not-uncommon occurrence for Déjà Vu to be mistaken for a greatest hits collection. From the "family photo album" vibe of the cover (nobody at the grocery store knew who Dallas Taylor or Greg Reeves were) and the title itself, to the ridiculously front-loaded song sequence and the fact that it was often one of the only (if not the only) albums in the "CSN(&Y)" section, Déjà Vu gave the impression that it was designed to be representative of the very best that this group had to offer. Maybe in some weird, "underground" record store, a bunch more albums credited to the group could be found, but for regular folks, Déjà Vu was a sufficiently high-quality distillation of their creative output. Of course, Déjà Vu is not a greatest hits album, but one could be forgiven for making the mistake: three of the record’s 10 tracks were generation-defining top 10 hits ("Woodstock," "Teach Your Children," "Our House"), a fourth ("Carry On") was a radio staple, and four others (Crosby's "Almost Cut My Hair" and "Déjà Vu," Young's "Helpless" and "Country Girl") were iconic additions to their authors' oeuvres. Still, it was only the second album recorded by Crosby, Stills, and Nash, and the first to which Neil Young was invited to participate, so the lines were blurred between "follow-up," "debut," and "supergroup outing." And considering that each member of the ad hoc quartet brought their A-game to the sessions, it's none too surprising that the album made the impact that it did. Of course, those sessions were rough sledding—even for a group renowned for a toxic in-studio blend of extraordinary talent, high expectations, tense competitiveness, and dizzyingly poor interpersonal relationship skills, the work that went into Déjà Vu was exceptionally exhausting. This remarkable deluxe edition documents an illuminating chunk of that work, compiling demos, outtakes, and alternate takes that demonstrate how much revision and editing went into Déjà Vu. The demos disc features five of the album cuts plus a dozen songs that didn't make the record, mostly with just the primary singer and a guitar or piano, but occasionally with more players and singers; you should skip directly to the wobbly, home-recorded version of "Our House" with Graham Nash, a laughing Joni Mitchell, and a tinkly piano. A treasure trove of more fully built-out numbers comprise the outtakes disc. Notably devoid of any Young-penned tunes, many of the cuts here are Stills' ("Bluebird Revisited" would show up the next year on his second solo album; this version is looser and far superior), but Nash ("Horses Through A Rainstorm") and Crosby ("Laughing") also left some high-quality work on the table when it came to making Déjà Vu. The alternate versions of the album cuts are less enlightening, but still essential to understanding the labor that went into making this masterpiece. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
From
CD$2.99

Rock - Released April 28, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
CD$2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 22, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
CD$2.99

Rock - Released April 14, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
CD$30.79

Metal - Released April 9, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
CD$2.99

Rock - Released March 31, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
CD$2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 25, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic

From
CD$2.99

Rock - Released March 17, 2021 | Rhino Atlantic