Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
CD$18.99

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Associated Labels

Recorded about the same time as Night and Day, his most popular releaseJoe Jackson's brilliant soundtrack to the movie Mike's Murder is consistent in quality to that 1982 pop music masterpiece. Side one contains five pop gems which could have easily fit nicely on the Night and Day album. Side two contains three instrumental tracks. Unfortunately, the movie stiffed, so the record company did not back the record. It's a great album, though. © Tim Griggs /TiVo
From
CD$36.39

Rock - Released June 9, 1978 | Polydor Associated Labels

Distinctions The Absolute Sound: Best Reissued Releases Of The Year
While young punks were stealing the limelight, the Rolling Stones stuck to their guns on Some Girls and proved that they weren’t ready for the nursing home just yet. With its eye-catching album cover by Peter Corriston (who had already designed the cover art for Led Zep's Physical Graffiti) the 1978 album marked Keith Richards’ return to business, having left the helm too much to the showman Mick Jagger on It's Only Rock 'n Roll (1974) and Black & Blue (1976). His riffs add an incredibly human touch, transcending the entirety of this unhoped-for record. When the Whip Comes Down, Some Girls, Lies, Respectable, Before They Make Me Run, Shattered and the immense Beast of Burden prove that basic rock'n'roll could still exist between the punk revolution and the disco tsunami. Though even in this field, the Stones excelled with Miss You. And to perfect this eclecticism, Ron Wood even rolled out the pedal steel on Far Away Eyes for a wonderful country interlude. Some people think that Some Girls was the last great Rolling Stones record. With hindsight, they might not be wrong... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
CD$26.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2011 | Polydor Associated Labels

While young punks were stealing the limelight, the Rolling Stones stuck to their guns on Some Girls and proved that they weren’t ready for the nursing home just yet. With its eye-catching album cover by Peter Corriston (who had already designed the cover art for Led Zep's Physical Graffiti) the 1978 album marked Keith Richards’ return to business, having left the helm too much to the showman Mick Jagger on It's Only Rock 'n Roll (1974) and Black & Blue (1976). His riffs add an incredibly human touch, transcending the entirety of this unhoped-for record. When the Whip Comes Down, Some Girls, Lies, Respectable, Before They Make Me Run, Shattered and the immense Beast of Burden prove that basic rock'n'roll could still exist between the punk revolution and the disco tsunami. Though even in this field, the Stones excelled with Miss You. And to perfect this eclecticism, Ron Wood even rolled out the pedal steel on Far Away Eyes for a wonderful country interlude. Some people think that Some Girls was the last great Rolling Stones record. With hindsight, they might not be wrong... © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
CD$6.39

Pop - Released September 29, 2008 | Polydor Associated Labels

From
CD$6.39

Alternative & Indie - Released December 8, 2008 | Polydor Associated Labels

From
CD$39.59

Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Associated Labels

To coincide with their 30th anniversary reunion tour in 2007 the Police released the anthology The Police, the first two-CD retrospective ever assembled on the group. They may not have had a double compilation to their credit, but they had single discs and box sets, which may raise the question of whether they need a set like this -- and the answer is yes, but this set falls just a bit short of being the definitive Police double disc. At only 28 tracks, this feels a little too slim. It may be twice as long as 1995's Every Breath You Take: The Classics (and, in a way, that was only 12 tracks, since that contained the 1986 remake of "Don't Stand So Close to Me" and a classic rock mix of "Message in a Bottle," which were little more than padding), but there are a handful of Police staples that are missing, including "Born in the '50s," "The Bed's Too Big Without You," "Shadows in the Rain," and "Rehumanize Yourself," and the heavy emphasis on Synchronicity (all but three songs from the LP are present; yes, Andy Summers' bizarro "Mother" is one of the tunes missing in action) threatens to overwhelm the second disc. That said, Synchronicity does deserve such a heavy exposure, given that it's the band's biggest album, and it's hard to argue with the rest of the selections here since it covers all the familiar hits and most, but not all, of the second-tier classics including "Truth Hits Everybody," "Bring on the Night," "Canary in a Coalmine," "Driven to Tears," and their first single, "Fallout." It may not seem like much, but if those aforementioned four tunes were here, The Police would have all the core songs from the trio and this would be truly definitive, but as it stands this collection stands as simply an excellent overview. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$26.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Associated Labels

On their singles and EPs, the Horrors proved they'd done their post-punk and freakbeat homework. With their debut album, Strange House, they push their sound forward, distill it to its rawest essence, and give it a few funhouse mirror twists and turns for good measure. Almost half of the songs on the album already appeared on previous Horrors releases, but the ever-so-slightly cleaner production here gives more definition to their black-on-black sound. The band kicks off Strange House by revisiting their cover of Screaming Lord Sutch's "Jack the Ripper," which begins at a zombie-slow pace, then suddenly speeds up halfway through, transforming into a hurtling roller coaster of a song that makes a great introduction to Strange House's mix of campy humor, energy, and menace. With its dive-bombing noise barely held together by Faris Badwan's shouting and the faintest hint of a melody, "Sheena Is a Parasite" is still the Horrors' best and most radical song, although several other tracks here rival its black-hearted thrills. Once again, Spider Webb's vicious keyboards are the band's not-so-secret weapon, especially on the fantastic, strutting "She Is the New Thing," which blurs the line between girls and trends, flings and boredom, with macabre flair. On Strange House's wildest tracks, the Horrors channel their idol Joe Meek's love of wild sounds. "Thunderclaps" grafts galloping rhythms, twangy guitars, and chanted backing vocals together, Frankenstein-style, while "Little Victories" brandishes noisy onslaughts and turns them off just as quickly. The very end of the album gets even weirder and more deconstructed: "Gil Sleeping"'s woozy organs and jazzy drumming and "A Train Roars"' ominous, loping rhythms show that the Horrors are committed to pushing the boundaries of their sound, even if these experiments aren't quite as immediate as their more song-based work. The Horrors are unabashedly arty and stylish, but they're a great example of the kind of art-school band that lurks in the shadows of British rock (and of which there have been too few in the 2000s). If you like what the Horrors do, then Strange House is an album that can never be loud enough. © Heather Phares /TiVo
From
CD$11.79

Rock - Released July 24, 2007 | Polydor Associated Labels

Halfway between Fever to Tell's saucy rave-ups and the somber, slower sound of Show Your Bones, the Is Is EP is a welcome reminder of how potent the Yeah Yeah Yeahs are when they're firing on all cylinders. It also reaffirms that the Yeah Yeah Yeahs may be at their best on their EPs: Is Is delivers sleekly nasty rockers and vulnerable moments that are often more focused than the band's album tracks. Though the songs here are balanced between the extremes of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs' sound, their performances sound wilder than they have in a while, and the production -- which is neither too raw nor overcooked with studio fussing -- shows them off perfectly. "Tell Me What Rockers to Swallow" is savage and spare, taking hairpin turns from precision to chaos as Karen O unleashes vocals befitting her rep as one of the iconic women in rock of the 2000s. Nick Zinner and Brian Chase sound just as fiery and inspired on "Kiss Kiss," one of the soaring, earnest songs the Yeah Yeah Yeahs deliver from time to time just to show that they're not too cool to sound excited. Is Is's slower songs keep the energy and focus of the louder tracks: despite its dominatrixy title, "Down Boy" sounds a little like a slowed-down version of Show Your Bones' "Phenomenon" -- or even a little bit like a much slower cover of Franz Ferdinand's "Take Me Out" -- and "10 X 10" shows that O's prettier style of singing can fit into the Yeah Yeah Yeahs' sound just as well as her feral side. Not surprisingly, Is Is' title track is the standout, a majestic, fiery, and heartbroken epic that feels like the opposite of "Maps." Most of the songs here were written in the time between Fever to Tell and Show Your Bones and seemed to disappear after they were previewed on the Tell Me What Rockers to Swallow concert DVD, so it's nice to see them get a proper release. Is Is may not be the Yeah Yeah Yeahs' most immediately accessible music, but it is some of their most compelling work in some time. © Heather Phares /TiVo
From
CD$6.39

Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Associated Labels

From
CD$3.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Associated Labels

From
CD$6.39

Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Associated Labels

From
CD$4.79

Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Polydor Associated Labels

From
CD$39.59

Pop - Released October 16, 2006 | Polydor Associated Labels

Chris Rea was a rock star with the sort of gravel voice that was ideally suited to singing the blues, or was he a blues star who occasionally lent his talent to performing rock. The Road to Hell & Back was his 28th album in total including five different greatest-hits compilations, but was his first live album. Recorded at various venues during his 2006 tour from Warsaw to Moscow and Plymouth, Oxford and Brighton, all the tracks show a tight, together band, the Fireflies led by Chris Rea, not in the best of health but enjoying performing to appreciative, sometimes too polite audiences, who applaud in all the right places (at the end of each song). Amazingly for an artist with such a famous repertoire of songs, he had only ever hit the Top Ten of the singles chart with one song, "The Road to Hell. Pt. 2" and along with its slower precursor, "Pt. 1," is included here along with Chris Rea favorites, "Josephine," "Stainsby Girls," "On the Beach," (on which he broke into some Bob Marley type reggae), "Let's Dance," and his first-ever hit single "Fool If You Think It's Over." Opening the set with a Jools Holland type of boogie-woogie with the track "Jazzy Blue," the band, almost as if in keeping with the politeness of the audiences, play a minimalist set, almost acoustic. "Josephine" takes almost four minutes to warm up, and "Stony Road" chugs slowly along until the guitar breaks in after nearly three minutes, but the tracks are given time to mature and develop. Both "I Can Hear Your Heartbeat" with its Dire Straits type guitar licks, and the two parts of "The Road to Hell" are over ten minutes each and "Stainsby Girls" and "Somewhere Between Highway 61 And 49" are both extended to over eight minutes, the former showing that the band can most definitely rock, and the latter giving the blues a chance to really grind the audience into believing they could really be somewhere in the Mississippi Delta instead of the Moscow Kremlin Palace watching a man from Middlesbrough, a town in the North East of England. © Sharon Mawer /TiVo
From
CD$26.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | Polydor Associated Labels

Chris Rea was a rock star with the sort of gravel voice that was ideally suited to singing the blues, or was he a blues star who occasionally lent his talent to performing rock. The Road to Hell & Back was his 28th album in total including five different greatest-hits compilations, but was his first live album. Recorded at various venues during his 2006 tour from Warsaw to Moscow and Plymouth, Oxford and Brighton, all the tracks show a tight, together band, the Fireflies led by Chris Rea, not in the best of health but enjoying performing to appreciative, sometimes too polite audiences, who applaud in all the right places (at the end of each song). Amazingly for an artist with such a famous repertoire of songs, he had only ever hit the Top Ten of the singles chart with one song, "The Road to Hell. Pt. 2" and along with its slower precursor, "Pt. 1," is included here along with Chris Rea favorites, "Josephine," "Stainsby Girls," "On the Beach," (on which he broke into some Bob Marley type reggae), "Let's Dance," and his first-ever hit single "Fool If You Think It's Over." Opening the set with a Jools Holland type of boogie-woogie with the track "Jazzy Blue," the band, almost as if in keeping with the politeness of the audiences, play a minimalist set, almost acoustic. "Josephine" takes almost four minutes to warm up, and "Stony Road" chugs slowly along until the guitar breaks in after nearly three minutes, but the tracks are given time to mature and develop. Both "I Can Hear Your Heartbeat" with its Dire Straits type guitar licks, and the two parts of "The Road to Hell" are over ten minutes each and "Stainsby Girls" and "Somewhere Between Highway 61 And 49" are both extended to over eight minutes, the former showing that the band can most definitely rock, and the latter giving the blues a chance to really grind the audience into believing they could really be somewhere in the Mississippi Delta instead of the Moscow Kremlin Palace watching a man from Middlesbrough, a town in the North East of England. © Sharon Mawer /TiVo
From
CD$26.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | Polydor Associated Labels

Chris Rea was a rock star with the sort of gravel voice that was ideally suited to singing the blues, or was he a blues star who occasionally lent his talent to performing rock. The Road to Hell & Back was his 28th album in total including five different greatest-hits compilations, but was his first live album. Recorded at various venues during his 2006 tour from Warsaw to Moscow and Plymouth, Oxford and Brighton, all the tracks show a tight, together band, the Fireflies led by Chris Rea, not in the best of health but enjoying performing to appreciative, sometimes too polite audiences, who applaud in all the right places (at the end of each song). Amazingly for an artist with such a famous repertoire of songs, he had only ever hit the Top Ten of the singles chart with one song, "The Road to Hell. Pt. 2" and along with its slower precursor, "Pt. 1," is included here along with Chris Rea favorites, "Josephine," "Stainsby Girls," "On the Beach," (on which he broke into some Bob Marley type reggae), "Let's Dance," and his first-ever hit single "Fool If You Think It's Over." Opening the set with a Jools Holland type of boogie-woogie with the track "Jazzy Blue," the band, almost as if in keeping with the politeness of the audiences, play a minimalist set, almost acoustic. "Josephine" takes almost four minutes to warm up, and "Stony Road" chugs slowly along until the guitar breaks in after nearly three minutes, but the tracks are given time to mature and develop. Both "I Can Hear Your Heartbeat" with its Dire Straits type guitar licks, and the two parts of "The Road to Hell" are over ten minutes each and "Stainsby Girls" and "Somewhere Between Highway 61 And 49" are both extended to over eight minutes, the former showing that the band can most definitely rock, and the latter giving the blues a chance to really grind the audience into believing they could really be somewhere in the Mississippi Delta instead of the Moscow Kremlin Palace watching a man from Middlesbrough, a town in the North East of England. © Sharon Mawer /TiVo
From
CD$26.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2006 | Polydor Associated Labels

Many bands break up at the right time, or at least a little past it, but the Lemonheads' disbandment seemed premature, particularly because it didn't seem like they officially broke up; they just faded away. For Lemonheads leader Evan Dando, it was a surprisingly quick fall from glory -- or at least from being a Sassy star and one of People's Most Beautiful People, touted as the next big thing after Kurt Cobain, to being alt-rock's most notorious also-ran. Not long after the group's fourth album for Atlantic, 1996's Car Button Cloth, he quietly pulled the plug on the group and slinked away from the spotlight, taking a long, long time to recharge. After seven years, he resurfaced with a sleepy but likeable solo debut called Baby I'm Bored in 2003, and that activity apparently lit a fire underneath Dando, since three years later he reunited the Lemonheads, releasing an eponymous album that fall. The album only confirms the suspicion that the group should never have broken up -- unless that Dando needed the time to sober up and get refocused, since he certainly couldn't have made a record as tight and direct as this in the mid-'90s. Lord knows he tried, but for as wonderful as much of 1993's Come on Feel the Lemonheads and Car Button Cloth are, both are ragged and filled with aimless filler, two things thankfully missing from The Lemonheads. Like the 1992 power pop classic It's a Shame About Ray, this is brief, lively, and tuneful, filled with two-to-three-minute songs that make their point and then get out of the way. If this isn't as incandescent, joyful, and effervescent as It's a Shame About Ray, that's because this is the work of a different band, one that's a bit older and not quite as exuberant, but one that nevertheless displays a renewed vigor and sense of purpose. And not only does the band sound excellent -- whether they're working as a trio or being goosed along by J Mascis, who provides typically excellent guitar on occasion here -- but they have a good batch of songs here that add up to Dando's most consistent album in years. They're zippier and catchier than anything on Baby I'm Bored, and even if there aren't any outright immediate classics along the lines of "If I Could Talk I'd Tell You," song for song this builds into not only a strong comeback, but one of the group's better records. The best thing that can be said about The Lemonheads is that it sounds like the album Dando and company should have released in 1995 -- and that it sounds like they could turn another of these out soon and that it'd be every bit as good. Which is the right kind of return for a band that should never have gone away in the first place. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$26.99

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released January 1, 2004 | Polydor Associated Labels

From
CD$26.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | Polydor Associated Labels

Sting scored a moderate comeback success greater than most had imagined possible with 1999's Brand New Day, reestablishing himself as a viable commercial artist instead of merely settling for "living legend" status. Part of this success was due to "Desert Rose," featuring vocalist Farhat Bouallagui's careening cadences that garnered attention, particularly when they were showcased in a car commercial that kicked the album into high commercial gear. Sting picks up on this, adding three guest vocalists to the ten-track Sacred Love album (the 11th track is a remix of the lead single, "Send Your Love" -- which happens to be better, since it eliminates the rather annoying Indian-styled hook) -- Vicente Amigo and Anoushka Shankar are paired with Mary J. Blige, who in this context is presented as a world music artist. None of the guests makes much of an impression here, but neither does Sting, since this is an album that puts sound over song or performance. Sacred Love is to Brand New Day what Mercury Falling was to Ten Summoner's Tales -- a fussy, overworked stab at maturity, one that has impeccable craft but is obscured by its own meticulousness. It is professional to a fault, using its maturity and preciseness to obscure the fact that the songs don't really work. Sting isn't always hemmed-in, even ending "Inside" with a hysterical rant that makes him seem like a madman, but it has the effect of making the rest of the album seeming too deliberate and far from adventurous. It's far from a bad listen, nor is it embarrassing, but it's entirely too predictable, coming across as nothing more than well-tailored, expensive mood music, which is certainly far less than what Sacred Love could have been. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$26.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | Polydor Associated Labels

Sheryl Crow was one of the key artists of the '90s, if the yardstick is capturing the sound and spirit of the time. A former backing vocalist for Michael Jackson -- an association that led to dubious tabloid headlines romantically linking her with the singer long before she was a star in her own right -- she rode the first great wave of Women in Rock hysteria of the alt-rock explosion to fame with her first album, Tuesday Night Music Club, in 1994, settling into the weary aftermath of the post-grunge years with her brilliant eponymous second album in 1996, riding out the end years of the Clinton administration with the measured, mature Globe Sessions in 1998, and then defying the gloom of the W years by soaking up the sun on 2002's C'mon C'mon. It was a body of work that defined the times without getting too much critical respect (similar to Billy Joel in that respect, even if the music is totally dissimilar), and while her albums were always good and occasionally terrific, she made her greatest mark as a singles artist on the ever-morphing world of '90s radio. Released in late 2003, The Very Best of Sheryl Crow is the first attempt to summarize those years, and it does a pretty good job of it. All of the big hits are here: the deceptively effervescent "All I Wanna Do," the defiantly effervescent "Soak Up the Sun," the sweet resignation of "My Favorite Mistake," the giddy "Everyday Is a Winding Road," the evocative "Leaving Las Vegas," the sexily exhausted "If It Makes You Happy," the soccer-mom anthem "A Change Would Do You Good," the absurd escapism of the heavily Pro Tooled "Steve McQueen," and best of all, "Picture," a superb country duet with Kid Rock previously unavailable on any of Crow's albums. If the collection seems to be missing songs, it's because it is. Like most contemporary hits collection, it chooses to highlight album tracks ("Home," "The Difficult Kind," "I Shall Believe") in lieu of minor hits -- a tactic that is highly debatable, since those album tracks may be favorites of the artist or the concert-attending audience yet those who follow an artist via the radio will find many songs absent, some more noteworthy than others. In this case, "Run Baby Run," "Can't Cry Anymore," "D'yer Mak'er," "Anything but Down," "Sweet Child O Mine," and "C'Mon C'Mon" are all missing in action, with "Can't Cry Anymore," "Anything but Down," and maybe "Run Baby Run" being truly missed (the covers of Zeppelin and Guns N' Roses being the byproduct of the '90s pop climate where major and minor artists alike had more contributions to soundtracks, benefit albums, and tribute records than could be counted; some hit the charts, as in this case, but most didn't). This is a minor quibble, since it effects the general texture and feel of the album more than the overall effect, but it's enough to keep it from being the unqualified home run that it should have been. Even so, The Very Best of Sheryl Crow does capture her biggest and best songs, adding two good new songs to the mix (a cover of Cat Stevens' "The First Cut Is the Deepest," which uses Rod Stewart's version as the starting point, and the solid new song "Light in Your Eyes"), that in turn capture the feel of the '90s by proxy. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$26.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | Polydor Associated Labels