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Film Soundtracks - Released January 11, 2000 | Geffen

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 20, 2019 | Sony Classical

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For this feature based on a story from the First World War that his grandfather told him, director Sam Mendes chose to film a two-hour-long sequence shot. The radical cinematic concept could have led the composer Thomas Newman to create a score with only one musical colour and theme. Therefore, in order to accompany this “pedestrian road-movie” telling the story of two British soldiers who are tasked with bringing a crucial message to another squad, the composer behind the score for Skyfall (another Mendes film) chose to play the card of eclecticism, but also of surprise. Before being released into the wild, the characters rush around the famous trenches of the Great War. In Up The Down Trench, Newman incorporates electronic elements (that are therefore anachronistic), in order to accompany this journey filmed by Steadicam. Are we in a modern video game or in a real-life documentary on the First World War? Such is the ambiguity of the cinematic tour de force in which the music plays such an essential part. For other parts of the film, Thomas Newman is slightly more literal, using sonic textures as foggy as the plains of Northern France (The Boche) and incorporating particularly tense, nightmarish moments (Tripwire). Sometimes, the tension is more subtle like in the piece Gehenna, made up of 12 notes played on the piano (then by strings), grouped into four groups of three. Gehenna is a biblical place that signifies hell, which translates this melodic repetition, so discomforting in its strange irregularity. Alongside these atmospheres that are rare in Newman’s work, there are also ideas that conform more to his usual style, especially the tender and dream-like A Bit Of Tin and Come Back To Us. As for The Night Window, it’s probably one of the high points of the score due to its emotional scale. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 16, 2016 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 23, 2015 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 3, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 19, 2012 | Sony Classical

The 2012 film Skyfall represented the 23rd time that James Bond had graced the silver screen, the third time that 007 had been brought to life by Daniel Craig, and the second time that the film's title cut didn't make the official soundtrack. Like Chris Cornell's contribution to 2006's Casino Royale, Adele's "Skyfall" was relegated to downloadable single status, allowing more room for the full score, which in this case was supplied by the talented Thomas Newman, while leaving unassuming listeners bereft of what was traditionally the initial selling point for most of the long-running franchise's soundtracks. Newman, the ninth Bond composer, stays true to the Daniel Craig-era penchant for swapping John Barry's iconic orchestral cues for loop-heavy yet appropriately moody and propulsive electronic elements that would have benefited from a lighter touch, which is surprising considering some of Newman's career highlights (American Beauty, Shawshank Redemption, Road to Perdition). That said, the occasional tips of the hat to the past ("Grand Bazaar, Istanbul," "Breadcrumbs") and some truly explosive ("Tennyson") and somber ("Voluntary Retirement") moments help to balance out the score's more rote passages. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released August 12, 2002 | Decca - London

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Film Soundtracks - Released June 17, 2016 | Walt Disney Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 29, 2021 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released March 29, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released February 24, 2012 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 20, 2003 | Walt Disney Records

While Disney and Pixar's previous films -- Toy Story, Toy Story 2, A Bug's Life, and Monsters Inc. -- relied on the musical gifts of Randy Newman for their scores and charming theme songs, for the undersea adventure Finding Nemo they recruited the skills of another Newman. Academy Award-nominate composer Thomas Newman, to be exact, and his eclectic, slightly ethereal style is an inspired match for the film's aquatic setting. From the "Jaws"-like tension in "Barracuda" to the gentle, rippling "Nemo Egg (Main Title)," Newman captures the wonder, in its most terrifying and playful forms, of the water-dwelling denizens that make up Finding Nemo's cast of characters. Best of all, even though this is music for a so-called children's movie, Newman didn't dumb down his style or try to make it perky and "kid-friendly"; tracks such as "Wow," "First Day," and "Lost in Fog" are just as haunting and complex as anything he would write for a "grown-up" film. That's not to say, however, that Newman didn't have fun writing the music or that listeners won't enjoy more playful tracks like "The Turtle Lope," "Mr. Ray, Scientist," or "...P. Sherman, 42 Wallaby Way, Sydney." From dreamy to scary to silly, each of Newman's 39 cues for Finding Nemo is a wonderfully intricate, miniature composition. While this score may not be quite as dazzling as his work on scores like American Beauty, this is still a thoughtful and rewarding collection of music that is absolutely perfect for the film it supports. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1993 | Varese Sarabande

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 18, 2020 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 25, 2015 | Sony Classical

Directed by Davis Guggenheim (An Inconvenient Truth, It Might Get Loud), He Named Me Malala is a documentary about Pakistani Nobel Peace Prize laureate and girls' education advocate Malala Yousafzai, who was critically wounded by a gunshot on her way home from school at age 15, a target of the Taliban. The film's score, by award-winning composer Thomas Newman (Skyfall, American Beauty, Finding Nemo), tackles the profound subject matter with intimate strings, woodwinds, harp, and piano, as well as more percussive regional Asian influences and atmospheric female vocals ("I Am Malala," "Speak What Is in Your Soul"). Occasionally sentimental but mostly atmospheric and reverent, the score recording provides over 50 minutes of original music. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 19, 2008 | Nonesuch

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2015 | Hollywood Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released February 25, 2011 | Relativity Music Group

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 7, 2014 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 10, 1995 | Sony Classical

Largely overshadowed by The Shawshank Redemption, Thomas Newman's other Academy Award-nominated score from 1994, Little Women nevertheless remains one of the finest efforts of the composer's career, its unsentimental pastoral beauty vividly evoking Louisa May Alcott's indelible frontier world. Employing period instruments including piano, flute and strings, Little Women boasts a homespun charm that wonderfully complements Newman's warm, lilting melodies -- perhaps the most telling tribute one can pay this music is that the original compositions fit interchangeably with the soundtrack's public domain entries from Francis Johnson, Claudio Grafulla and Conrad Kocher, capturing the sound and spirit of early Americana to perfection. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo