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Electronic - Released December 4, 2007 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Electronic - Released April 7, 2008 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

What with Vince Clarke living in semi-retirement in rural Maine and New Order suddenly realizing after 30 years that they don't like each other all that much, it's a hard time to be a fan of synthesizer dance pop from the '80s. Until the Presets' second album comes on, that is. The Sydney-based duo of singer Julian Hamilton and synthesist Kim Moyes is straight-ahead old-fashioned electro-pop circa 1984, when the fusion of the Human League and Giorgio Moroder was complete but the cold, hard demands of techno and house hadn't yet asserted themselves outside of Detroit and Chicago. Tracks like first single "My People" and its surging follow-up, "This Boy's in Love," have the characteristic blend of steely synths, thumping electronic beats, and Motown-derived soul-tinged vocals that characterized the predominant strain of mid-'80s synth pop. It's not entirely retro -- "Eucalyptus," the Daft Punk-like "Talk Like That," and the soaring "A New Sky" would sound at home in any mainstream club DJ's set circa 2008 -- but the overall feel of the album from its arrangements to the sci-fi-themed cover art and even the album title (which several artists used for songs back in the day, from the Monochrome Set and Lords of the New Church to the Motels and Mental as Anything) harks back to the day when the Fairlight CMI was the height of musical sophistication and Jellybean Benitez and Arthur Baker were the hottest remixers on the block. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Electronic - Released April 11, 2008 | Modular

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Electronic - Released April 11, 2008 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Dance - Released April 12, 2008 | Modular

What with Vince Clarke living in semi-retirement in rural Maine and New Order suddenly realizing after 30 years that they don't like each other all that much, it's a hard time to be a fan of synthesizer dance pop from the '80s. Until the Presets' second album comes on, that is. The Sydney-based duo of singer Julian Hamilton and synthesist Kim Moyes is straight-ahead old-fashioned electro-pop circa 1984, when the fusion of the Human League and Giorgio Moroder was complete but the cold, hard demands of techno and house hadn't yet asserted themselves outside of Detroit and Chicago. Tracks like first single "My People" and its surging follow-up, "This Boy's in Love," have the characteristic blend of steely synths, thumping electronic beats, and Motown-derived soul-tinged vocals that characterized the predominant strain of mid-'80s synth pop. It's not entirely retro -- "Eucalyptus," the Daft Punk-like "Talk Like That," and the soaring "A New Sky" would sound at home in any mainstream club DJ's set circa 2008 -- but the overall feel of the album from its arrangements to the sci-fi-themed cover art and even the album title (which several artists used for songs back in the day, from the Monochrome Set and Lords of the New Church to the Motels and Mental as Anything) harks back to the day when the Fairlight CMI was the height of musical sophistication and Jellybean Benitez and Arthur Baker were the hottest remixers on the block. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Electronic - Released April 12, 2008 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

What with Vince Clarke living in semi-retirement in rural Maine and New Order suddenly realizing after 30 years that they don't like each other all that much, it's a hard time to be a fan of synthesizer dance pop from the '80s. Until the Presets' second album comes on, that is. The Sydney-based duo of singer Julian Hamilton and synthesist Kim Moyes is straight-ahead old-fashioned electro-pop circa 1984, when the fusion of the Human League and Giorgio Moroder was complete but the cold, hard demands of techno and house hadn't yet asserted themselves outside of Detroit and Chicago. Tracks like first single "My People" and its surging follow-up, "This Boy's in Love," have the characteristic blend of steely synths, thumping electronic beats, and Motown-derived soul-tinged vocals that characterized the predominant strain of mid-'80s synth pop. It's not entirely retro -- "Eucalyptus," the Daft Punk-like "Talk Like That," and the soaring "A New Sky" would sound at home in any mainstream club DJ's set circa 2008 -- but the overall feel of the album from its arrangements to the sci-fi-themed cover art and even the album title (which several artists used for songs back in the day, from the Monochrome Set and Lords of the New Church to the Motels and Mental as Anything) harks back to the day when the Fairlight CMI was the height of musical sophistication and Jellybean Benitez and Arthur Baker were the hottest remixers on the block. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Dance - Released September 27, 2008 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Dance - Released March 23, 2009 | Modular

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Dance - Released September 17, 2012 | Modular

Australian electro duo the Presets create a kind of temporal convergence, blending electronic music's past with its present on their third album, Pacifica. Making modern dance music with the feel of synth pop, the pair are able to pull off an interesting sonic trick, delivering an album that feels distinctly '80s without actually sounding like it's from that era. While Pacifica's production is crisp and clear, the album has a dark vibe running through it, adding a vaguely unsettling feeling to the songs' pulsing rhythms to give the whole thing a nocturnal feeling. This approach goes a long way in helping the album feel like something new rather than just a rehash of the past, giving a nod to groups like New Order without lifting anything directly out of their playbook. While the album might be shrouded in a veneer of synth pop, the nuts and bolts come straight from the world of progressive house/trance, providing Pacifica with the necessary propulsion to send the album racing off into the dark unknown, making it the ideal soundtrack to the after party after the after party. While the murky atmosphere and late-night pulse of songs like "Push" and "Fast Seconds," might not immediately scream fun, there's something undeniably engaging about them, highlighting the Presets' knack for hooking straight into that part of the brain that demands you hit the floor and dance until the sun comes crawling over the horizon. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Dance - Released June 29, 2012 | Modular

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Electronic - Released September 7, 2012 | Modular

Booklet
Australian electro duo the Presets create a kind of temporal convergence, blending electronic music's past with its present on their third album, Pacifica. Making modern dance music with the feel of synth pop, the pair are able to pull off an interesting sonic trick, delivering an album that feels distinctly '80s without actually sounding like it's from that era. While Pacifica's production is crisp and clear, the album has a dark vibe running through it, adding a vaguely unsettling feeling to the songs' pulsing rhythms to give the whole thing a nocturnal feeling. This approach goes a long way in helping the album feel like something new rather than just a rehash of the past, giving a nod to groups like New Order without lifting anything directly out of their playbook. While the album might be shrouded in a veneer of synth pop, the nuts and bolts come straight from the world of progressive house/trance, providing Pacifica with the necessary propulsion to send the album racing off into the dark unknown, making it the ideal soundtrack to the after party after the after party. While the murky atmosphere and late-night pulse of songs like "Push" and "Fast Seconds," might not immediately scream fun, there's something undeniably engaging about them, highlighting the Presets' knack for hooking straight into that part of the brain that demands you hit the floor and dance until the sun comes crawling over the horizon. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Dance - Released September 14, 2012 | Modular

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Dance - Released December 7, 2012 | Modular

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Dance - Released May 10, 2013 | Modular

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Dance - Released March 7, 2014 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Dance - Released August 1, 2014 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Dance - Released August 1, 2014 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Electronic - Released December 15, 2017 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

Electronic - Released February 9, 2018 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Electronic - Released February 9, 2018 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.