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Latin - Released September 16, 2014 | UMLE - Fonovisa

Distinctions Grammy Awards
While Los Tigres del Norte were widely celebrated for their 2011 live offering MTV Unplugged: Los Tigres del Norte and Friends, it had already been two years since they had released new studio material. Issued in 2010, El Rugido de Los Tigres del Norte was a compilation of previously released recordings from earlier in the 21st century. That makes Realidades the legendary norteño band's first set of brand-new songs in half a decade. It was worth the wait. The album's title is sobering, underscored by the set's devastating first single, "La Bala," about a seven-year-old child accidentally killed by a troubled teen. Musically, Los Tigres del Norte have remained very close to their tradition and root sound. They are uniquely gifted as storytellers when interpreting others' songs. This is reflected in "Historias de Ciudad" (on the two-disc Deluxe Edition), "La Jefa del Jefe," and the reading of Teodoro Bello's brilliant "El Gallo del Mojado." When assembled, the songs on Realidades offer portraits of life in North American cities from Harlem to Miami, from San Juan to Detroit, from Sinaloa to Los Angeles. But Los Tigres del Norte go deeper than sensationalist tabloid headlines, and their manner of playing and singing reveals the depth of emotion behind the narrative occurrences in the lyrics as they juxtapose narcocorridos and tableaus of gritty criminal life with notions of familial and romantic love -- as in the songs "Hoy le Hablo a Diario," "Así Es el Amor," the romantic "Era Diferente," and the heartbreaking "Necesitamos Conversar." As such, Realidades offers a 360-degree view of modern life that is beyond two-dimensional interpretations. The flavors of sweetness and bitterness, celebration and tragedy, and joy and heartache are all delivered with the soul and conviction that make Los Tigres del Norte so relevant to generation after generation. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Latin - Released July 26, 2019 | UMLE - Fonovisa

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World - Released November 29, 2005 | Iswjdigital

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Latin - Released September 13, 2019 | UMLE - Fonovisa

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Latin - Released March 7, 2006 | UMLE - Disa

When norteño fans are attempting to explain the polka-influenced style to those who know little or nothing about regional Mexican music, they compare it to everything from country to gangsta rap. The country comparison is made because of all the songs about heartache, loneliness, infidelity, and romantic disillusionment; the gangsta rap comparison is inspired by all the narco-corridos (corridos about drug trafficking) that los Tigres del Norte, Grupo Exterminador, the late Chalino Sanchez, and others are known for. And narco-corridos are a high priority on Jefe de Jefes (Boss of Bosses), which went down in history as one of the most essential Tigres albums of the '90s. This 1997 release (a two-CD set that sold over one million copies in the United States alone) was controversial; some Mexicans have accused narco-corridos of glorying the drug trade. But there is nothing on this album that paints drug trafficking in a favorable light -- quite the contrary. "Las Novias del Traficante," "El Dolor de un Padre," and other gems make it clear that los Tigres see drug trafficking for exactly what it is: a plague and a cancer. However, they aren't preachy or whiny about it; humor, in fact, is a prime ingredient on Jefe de Jefes, but the fact that los Tigres use humor to their artistic advantage doesn't mean that they're making light of a very serious and tragic problem. Not everything on Jefe de Jefes is about drug trafficking, and los Tigres are equally compelling when they write about other subjects -- for example, the Mexican immigrant who, on "El Mojado Acaudalado," misses Mexico despite his financial success in los Estados Unidos. Making this release a two-CD set was a questionable move on Fonovisa's part; the 65 minutes' worth of material would have easily fit on a single disc. Regardless, Jefe de Jefes is an excellent, consistently rewarding effort from this norteño powerhouse. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Latin - Released January 31, 2020 | UMLE - Fonovisa

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World - Released January 1, 1995 | Fonovisa

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World - Released January 1, 2001 | Fonovisa

Corrido themes have changed with the times, but the popular Mexican ballad's function has remained the same: recounting events, from the seemingly mundane to the historically significant. Corridos have portrayed the exploits of border heroes like Gregorio Cortez, leaders of the Mexican Revolution, Chiapas rebels, racehorses, Osama bin Laden, and even Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. Focused on drug trafficking in Mexico, the narcocorrido has emerged as a popular subgenre, with los Tigres del Norte among its pioneers. Although los Tigres weren't the first to sing narcocorridos (and corridos about smuggling date back to the 19th century), their 1972 record "Contrabando y Traición" was a pivotal release that inspired countless chroniclers of the badass narco lifestyle. Corridos Prohibidos contained some of their most memorable narco-themed songs and was one of their biggest hits. These bouncy, accordion-driven polkas might sound tame to non-Spanish speakers, but Jorge Hernández sings about gunfights with the police, treachery, retribution, and violent machismo. With its narrative enhanced by innovative (for the genre) sound effects, "La Camioneta Gris" tells of a drug-running couple's flight from los federales and their death under a train. "El Zorro de Ojinaga" concerns Pablo Acosta, who, in addition to funding hospitals and helping the poor, supplied one third of U.S. cocaine in the '80s and died in an FBI-assisted bust. While los Tigres depict modern outlaws, they also provide a sobering account of their legacy: "La Mafia Muere" paints a grim picture of Sinaloa after years of drug-related violence. Indeed, los Tigres have long displayed a social conscience; that's clearest here on "El Gato Félix," a corrido eulogizing Héctor Félix Miranda, the murdered Tijuana journalist renowned for denouncing corruption. Los Tigres' narcocorridos aren't as graphic as those of some of their followers, but Corridos Prohibidos shows why they're considered architects of the genre. © Wilson Neate /TiVo
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World - Released January 1, 1994 | Fonovisa

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World - Released January 1, 1984 | Fonovisa

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Latin - Released January 1, 1994 | Fonovisa

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Latin - Released January 1, 2003 | Fonovisa

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World - Released January 1, 1984 | Fonovisa

Los Tigres del Norte made their name with 1972's "Contrabando y Traición," a song that essentially launched the narcocorrido genre. However, the band's appropriation of the corrido as a vehicle for contemporary tales of drug smuggling is only one of their pioneering contributions to norteño music; another important dimension of Los Tigres' work is their portrayal of the immigrant experience. Jaula de Oro (1984) features two of their most memorable treatments of that topic. The working-class Mexican immigrant's ambivalent relationship with the U.S. -- lured north by the promise of economic progress, nostalgic for Mexico, and yet not belonging fully to either culture -- is part of Los Tigres' own story; in 1968, the barely teenage bandmembers left Sinaloa for California, later settling in San Jose. This album's centerpiece is the title track, which deals with the experience of undocumented immigrants and the irony of life in "the golden cage": the protagonist enjoys the material trappings of U.S. life but is afraid to leave his house lest he be deported; he wants to return to Mexico, but his children reject that heritage. "Pedro y Pablo" tells of the immigrant who, having gone north to fund his brother's education, comes back to discover his sibling has married the fiancée he left behind. Although Los Tigres display a sense of irony when addressing serious issues, elsewhere on Jaula de Oro their intentions are purely comic, as the playful Don Juan tale "El Agente del Amor" shows. Romance falls victim to betrayal on bittersweet ballads like "Que Te Hizo Olvidarme" and to death on "Por Qué Me Quité del Vicio," a dramatic adaptation of Carlos Rivas Larrauri's poem about an alcoholic widower. From socially aware songs to universal stories of unhappy love, Jaula de Oro captures the multi-faceted appeal of Los Tigres del Norte. © Wilson Neate /TiVo
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Latin - Released January 1, 2006 | Fonovisa

One of the most popular and respected acts of the thriving Norteno scene in the Mexico/Texas border region, Los Tigres del Norte reinforce their reputation with 2006's LA MUERTE DEL SOPLON. While many of these songs relate tales of a morbid nature, the music itself is quite lively and energetic, as revealed on the upbeat, accordion-laden title track (which translates as "The Informer's Death") and the jaunty, beat-driven "El Espinazo del Diablo" ("The Devil's Spine"). The juxtaposition is quite effective, and gets to the heart of the band's power. © TiVo
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Latin - Released May 14, 2021 | Fonovisa

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World - Released January 1, 1984 | Fonovisa

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World - Released January 1, 2000 | Fonovisa

Los Tigres Del Norte are one of the most respected groups in all of Norteno music. They've been at it since the '60s, racking up Grammys and record sales in unprecedented amounts for a group of their genre. As DE PAISANO makes clear, one of the main reasons for Los Tigres' consistent success is that they keep it simple. Throughout the album, they stick close to their Tex-Mex roots. Accordion, guitar, and emotive vocals are at the heart of their sound. There are no hip electronic enhancements added to their sound, no crossover pop moves like a string section or rock-flavored guitar. Instead, Los Tigres continue to do what they do best on DE PAISANO, and the Norteno audience should be grateful for that fact. © TiVo
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World - Released January 1, 1997 | Fonovisa

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World - Released January 1, 1989 | Fonovisa

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Latin - Released January 1, 1984 | Fonovisa