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Chamber Music - Released February 19, 2021 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
It's hard to imagine how anything could have been improved upon with this Brahms recital from three of Harmonia Mundi's most sensitive and interesting artists. The programming alone is a work of art: the idea of pairing the viola versions of Brahms's two autumnal Op. 120 Clarinet Sonatas inspired by Meiningen Orchestra clarinettist Richard Mühlfeld, with three further softly intimate works of his showcasing the viola's similarities with the human voice – viola and piano arrangements of Nachtigall from the six Op. 97 Songs (extra resonant, when Brahms described Mühlfeld as the nightingale of the orchestra) and the famous Op. 49 Wiegenlied, followed by the Op. 91 Zwei Gesänge for Voice, Viola and Piano. Then there's the instruments, because for Tamestit and Tiberghien these are just as important to the music's alchemy as the abilities of the performers, and their quest to find the perfect match for the penetrating, multi-shaded tones of Tamestit's Stradivarius viola eventually led them to an 1899 Bechstein piano. The result was two instruments capable of a range of colours and roundness of sound across all registers and through even the most virtuosic of passages; and that's precisely what you hear across the resultant lyrically tender, natural-feeling readings, because beyond the hand in glove chamber partnering you're hearing, their respective tones are both alive with colouristic complexities and verily glowing. Then, beyond being simply delicious, the vocal quality Tamestit draws out from the famous Wiegenlied melody serves as the perfect overture to the programme's Zwei Gesänge – shaped icing on the cake – yet another perfect combination, Tamestit's lines lovingly encircling and dovetailing with Goerne's own richly warm, gentle baritone, the polished Teldex Studio engineering casting them on satisfyingly equal footings with each other, with the piano just slightly behind. In short, absolutely gorgeous. © Charlotte Gardner/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released November 13, 2020 | Alkonost Classic

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama

Duets - Released November 6, 2020 | L'Encelade

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) composed the six sonatas for keyboard and violin while he was in the service of Prince Leopold of Koethen (1717-1723), a period during which he focussed on composing secular instrumental music. These works were not written as sonatas for a melodic instrument and a basso continuo part performed on the keyboard, as was usually the case at that time - on the contrary, Bach composed these six sonatas as works for three voices, so they are true trio sonatas. One voice is allocated to the violin and two to the two hands on the keyboard, thus giving greater contrapuntal depth to the way that they are composed. This fresh take on these sonatas for keyboard and violin comes with an invitation to embark upon an organ-driven journey. The six sonatas have been broken down into three duos, each of which has been recorded using a different organ and violin combination, whilst at the same time remaining stylistically consistent with the types of instrument with which was Bach was familiar and which he himself played. The three organs are all in the East German style and the violin-makers who inspired the instruments used for the recordings were contemporaries of Bach. The programme also offers a seventh sonata for keyboard and violin (BWV 1028) which is far better known in its version for the viola de gamba. It also includes two less well-known violin and basso continuo sonatas by Bach, inspired by the Italian style, which allows the listener to get a better grasp of the difference between the two compositional models. Freddy Eichelberger has also chosen to introduce the works for keyboard and violin with solo organ pieces which act rather like preludes, thus highlighting the sonority of each of the instruments. In this boxset, which celebrates a thirty-year musical bond between Odile Edouard and Freddy Eichelberger, it is used a different organ and violin pairing, so three sites were selected, mainly because they had the right kinds of organ for the project and were easily accessible. These were the church of Saint-Louis de Saint Étienne (Haute-Loire), the Temple de Boudry (Switzerland) and the Temple du Foyer de l’Âme (Paris). © L'Encelade
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Trios - Released October 16, 2020 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama
Philippe Cassard, Anne Gastinel and David Grimal present these two Beethovenian masterpieces. The chosen approach is one of colour and generosity. On this astonishing disc we meet a Beethoven come down from his pedestal, who is human and even jovial. Where so many others offer rigidity of discourse and fussy sonorities, the three musicians illuminate these metaphysical pages with the finesse, freshness and grace of the aquarellist. © La Dolce Volta
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Solo Piano - Released September 4, 2020 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama
In 2019, at the age of 22, Alexandre Kantorow became the first French pianist to win the prestigious Tchaikovsky Competition. Before then he had released three acclaimed albums, awarded distinctions such as "Diapason d'or de l'Année" and Gramophone's "Editor's Choice" and earning Kantorow descriptions ranging from 'Liszt reincarnated' to 'a firebreathing virtuoso with a poetic charm and innate stylistic mastery'. The present recital, his first release since the Tchaikovsky Competition, offers plenty of scope for virtuosity, poetry and charm, always filtered through an acute stylistic consciousness. The programme is constructed around three rhapsodies, a genre whose improvisatory character corresponds perfectly with the spirit of Romanticism but here interpreted by three highly distinct artistic temperaments: Franz Liszt, Johannes Brahms and Béla Bartók. © BIS Records
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Chamber Music - Released April 24, 2020 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
At the height of mental and physical pain, Schubert wrote Octet in F major in 1824, recalling the Septet, Op. 20 composed by Beethoven at about the same age. Their age gap meant that Beethoven opened the Classical age and Schubert the Romantic age. Schubert was composing his first works while Beethoven already had many masterpieces behind him. Played for the first time during a concert in homage to Beethoven who had just passed away, this marvellous Octet didn’t find its way to an editor at the time. It was found to be too long (62 minutes here, respecting all the repeats!) and was forgotten until its first complete edition in 1861 when it was admired by Brahms. During the String Quintet written four years later, the Octet alternates (as so often happens with Schubert) between moments of Viennese grace and deep melancholy. The Modigliani Quartet give a magnificent performance with experienced musicians including clarinettist Sabine Meyer, who showcases her incredibly expressive playing in the sublime Adagio, a true lullaby opening up to the next world that poor Schubert was awaiting in his early thirties. Bruno Schneider on horn, Dag Jensen on bassoon and Knut Erik Sundquist on double bass complete this ensemble of superb musicians giving Schubert a tender and fraternal humanity. © François Hudry/Qobuz

Chamber Music - Released January 17, 2020 | Alpha

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Solo Piano - Released September 13, 2019 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Chamber Music - Released April 12, 2019 | NoMadMusic

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
A is for “Amadeus,” and a recording which marks a return to the source for Quatuor Zaïde, who dedicate their fourth collection to the genius Austrian composer. Z is for Zaïde, a “Singspiel” by Mozart in the style of Die Zauberflöte, which historical transcription for string quartet is a world premiere! Paired with the Quartet in G Major, No. 14, K. 387, this miniature version of one of the most famous operas repeatedly casts each instrument of the quartet in a multitude of lyric roles, celebrating the eternal dialogue between singing and playing. © Nomadmusic

Chamber Music - Released March 15, 2019 | Fuga Libera

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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This fruitful “encounter” between Leonard Bernstein and Maurice Ravel juxtaposes Bernstein’s intensity and rhythmic vitality with the melancholy refinement of Ravel’s colours, while also highlighting the composers’ commonalities, such as a shared tonal language and masterful incorporation of jazz idioms. Our purpose, however, is not only to appreciate an artistic cross-exchange but also to build upon it. This is what Trio Zadig and Benjamin Attahir seek in Asfar, a new work that springs from the creative nexus of these 20th-century giants and continues the conversation. © Outhere Music
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Solo Piano - Released February 22, 2019 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Duets - Released February 8, 2019 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice
Despite (or because of) composing some twenty-seven symphonies, Nikolai Myaskovsky (1881-1950) has practically been forgotten about. He was a student of Liadov and Rimsky-Korsakov and a friend of Prokofiev, but he never ventured far from his romantic style of writing even when it was fading in popularity. Despite this, he was a fantastic composer of instrumental music, as demonstrated by this First Sonata composed in 1911 which has since been revised several times. Its lyricism is perfectly suited to the cello’s rich sound that is so close to the human voice. As a finalist of the Queen Elisabeth Competition in Belgium, special prize winner at the Tchaikovsy Competition in Moscow and ADAMI Classical Musical Talent in Paris, Bruno Philippe has amassed a whole host of prizes and awards, but it is a desire to play music that motivates him rather than a desire for recognition. After an initial project dedicated to Brahms’ two Sonatas, he signed with Harmonia Mundi and released an album dedicated to Beethoven and Schubert. Here, he explores the work of Myaskovsky with pianist and composer Jérôme Ducros, however most of this new recording is dedicated to Rachmaninov and includes two of his early pieces, Prelude and Oriental Dance and the famous Sonata for Cello and Piano in G minor. As an added bonus Prelude in C sharp minor is also included, a piece which Jérôme Ducros clearly enjoys playing and which we certainly enjoy listening to. This piece was one of the main reasons for the composer’s worldwide fame even though it was unexpected and he would have been grateful just for some public recognition for his symphonies. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released February 1, 2019 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama

Chamber Music - Released January 25, 2019 | B Records

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Trios - Released January 18, 2019 | Masterworks

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Chamber Music - Released January 11, 2019 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
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Solo Piano - Released October 5, 2018 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Solo Piano - Released September 14, 2018 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Choc de Classica
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Solo Piano - Released August 31, 2018 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Since the first composers started calling their works things like "nocturnes" or "serenades", there has been music designed specifically to evoke the dusk or the night. And then from the romantic period onward, the night began to become associated with worry, or even terror. Schumann's Phantasiestücke (1837) contain at least one nocturne movement in which the night is presented in a terroristic light (so to speak). In der Nacht, one of the great Schumannian moments, is concentrated into scarcely four minutes. Seventy years later, Ravel took the fear even further with Le Gibet, the central movement of Gaspard de la nuit – even more night – which tells of the gibbet where the hanged men twist gently to the sound of the night chimes; while Scarbo closes the triptych on the image of a nightmare dwarf. Finally, while Out of Doors by Bartók isn't necessarily all set at night, the fourth movement, The Night's Music, remains one of the most unsettling moments in all of piano literature. Born in Budapest in 1968, Dénes Várjon studied with György Kurtág and András Schiff. The winner of Liszt prizes as well as of Budapest's Géza Anda and Leo Weiner competitions, he has performed at the festivals of Salzburg, Lucerne, Davos and with the Vienna Chamber Orchestra, the Zürich Tonhalle, the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, and the Kremerata Baltica. © SM/Qobuz

Chamber Music - Released May 25, 2018 | Alpha

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - 5 étoiles de Classica
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It was when he heard a harpsichordist playing for the students at the university in his home town of Angers that Justin Taylor first discovered this instrument and its intriguing sound. He split his time between the piano and a harpsichord apprenticeship that he took with Olivier Beaumont and Blandine Rannou, also following masterclasses from Skip Sempé and Pierre Hantaï. What followed was a modern fairytale. The young man made furious progress, swiftly becoming a poster boy for the French harpsichord, winning the Bruges Competition and being named the musical "Revelation" of 2017, at the age of 23. A first album, dedicated to the Family Forqueray (Alpha, Qobuzissime) was showered in plaudits and soon followed by a number of concerts at prestigious festivals, which seem not to have remotely changed this young Franco-American. For his second project with Alpha Classics, Justin Taylor deftly blends Scarlatti with Ligeti, a composer he knows well, having played his formidable Continuum at the admission competition for the Conservatoire de Paris (CNSMD). In this new album, Scarlatti's harmonic daring joins a György Ligeti fascinated by the work of his distant Neapolitan colleague. The result is a real firework, lit and aimed by ten fingers which are as intelligent as they are fiendish – this artist is absolutely one to watch. © François Hudry/Qobuz
Promotion Chandos June 2021 Promotion Argerich 2021 EN

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Chamber Music in the magazine