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Classical - Released October 1, 2010 | Brilliant Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | naïve classique

Classical - Released June 22, 2010 | harmonia mundi

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Chamber Music - Released November 2, 2018 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica
The Concertos Op. 6 by Corelli were his last published work (in 1714), which doesn't necessarily mean that these twelve concertos were all written in the composer's later period – at the time, collections would sometimes be made bringing together works from very varied periods in an artist's life. Here are six of the dozen, kicking off with the Sinfonia pour Santa Beatrice d'Este; the selection is moves towards "church" concertos, slow-fast-slow-fast, which differ from the "chamber" concertos, whose format tends to follow that of dance suites. Op. 6 contains eight “chamber” (including the famous Christmas Concerto, not included here) and four “church”. This recording was made by the Freiburger Barockorchester, under Gottfried von der Goltz, and it differs quite radically from many previous recordings in one key sense: yes, the published score only includes strings, but we know that in Corelli's day it was standard practice to fill out orchestras with various wind instruments and continuos. The lists of players, and even the payrolls, which have survived to this day from the start of the 18th century show that oboes, bassoons, and even horns were added, and that's precisely what has happened here. The result is definitely a richer ensemble sound; and at the same time it's clear that the concertino (the three soloists) is still just two violins and a cello. It's the orchestra that's symphonising. This is sure to unsettle those who are used to more traditional recordings, even in the world of baroque. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Chamber Music - Released September 2, 2014 | Glossa

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released January 6, 2015 | OUR Recordings

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Archiv Produktion

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Chamber Music - Released September 23, 2013 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Chamber Music - Released February 17, 2017 | Pan Classics

Booklet
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Classical - Released April 1, 1999 | Glossa

Booklet
Even during his lifetime Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713) was a classic whose music circulated throughout Europe, was performed, heard, copied and, of course, transcribed for other instruments. The Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris preserves a successful anonymous arrangement of the twelve Violin Sonatas, Op. 5 for viola da gamba and basso continuo, which in all probability was made in Germany on the basis of the original edition printed in Rome in 1700. Master gambist Guido Balestracci and his outstanding colleagues have used both the ornaments of an old Amsterdam edition and their own newly improvised ones for their recording. © Note1
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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Bayard Musique

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Chamber Music - Released February 1, 1992 | Chandos

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Classical - Released November 6, 2012 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet
This release is part of an eight-disc series by the small historical-instrument ensemble London Baroque, covering the entire history of the trio sonata in four countries (Italy, Germany, France, and England) over two centuries (17th and 18th). The series is more aimed at those with a strong interest in Baroque instrumental music than at general listeners, but several of them have been attractive for anyone, and this album falls into that group. It might well have come first in a chronological series, for it includes the very first works that might be called trio sonatas, the Sonata a tre of Giovanni Cima, published in 1610, and the Sonata a tre secuondo tono, from 1621. These works were published in vocal collections, and they are for all intents and purposes Monteverdi-style opera numbers played on violins. But what you get as the program develops is a capsule history of instrumental music in the whole 17th century, as the pieces cohere into larger chunks and finally, in the piece by Giovanni Legrenzi, into individual movements. Parallel with this development was one that also continued through the entire Baroque: variations over a bass pattern or gorund. Pieces like Il Marcquetta by Giovanni Antonio Pandolfi (1669) or Giovanni Batista Vitali's Ciaconna (1682) are a far cry from Corelli's or Bach's variation pieces, but to hear them as an outgrowth of the earlier operatic style gives one a sense for the entire line of development. The music is enjoyable enough on its own terms, and London Baroque, led by violinists Ingrid Seifert and Richard Gwilt, has a feel for the rhetorical figures in the works of these mostly unknown composers. Recommended as usual with London Baroque for serious Baroque fans. © TiVo
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Chamber Music - Released January 1, 2013 | Glossa

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released October 14, 2013 | Zig-Zag Territoires

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Classical - Released April 1, 2006 | Brilliant Classics

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Classical - Released March 18, 2013 | Linn Records

Hi-Res Booklet
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Concertos - Released August 14, 2012 | Brilliant Classics

Booklet