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Rock - Erschienen am 11. Dezember 2015 | Rhino - Elektra

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CD16,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 27. Januar 2009 | Rhino - Elektra

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CD19,49 €

Rock - Erschienen am 10. November 2008 | Rhino - Elektra

Booklet
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CD9,99 €

Pop/Rock - Erschienen am 26. August 2003 | Vanguard

In late August of 2002, Warren Zevon was diagnosed with mesothelioma, a virulent and inoperable form of lung cancer; with his life expectancy expected to be no more than a few months, Zevon focused his dwindling energies on completing a final album, and The Wind, released a year after Zevon learned of his condition, was the result. With a back story like that, it's all but impossible to ignore the subtext of Zevon's mortality while listening to The Wind, though, thankfully, he's opted not to make an album about illness or death (ironically, he already did that with 2000's Life'll Kill Ya) or create a musical last will and testament. While The Wind occasionally and obliquely touches on Zevon's illness -- most notably the mournful "Keep Me in Your Heart" and the dirty blues raunch of "Rub Me Raw" -- in many ways it sounds like a fairly typical Warren Zevon album, though of course this time out the caustic wit cuts a bit deeper, the screeds against a world gone mad sound more woeful, and the love songs suggest higher emotional stakes than before. The Wind also lays in a higher compliment of celebrity guest stars than usual, and while obviously a lot of these folks are old friends wanting to help a pal in need, in some cases the ringers help to carry the weight for Zevon, who, while in good voice, can't summon up the power he did in his salad days. And remarkably, the trick works on several cuts; Bruce Springsteen's rollicking guest vocal on "Disorder in the House" offers just the kick the tune needed, Tom Petty's laid-back smirk brings a sleazy undertow to "The Rest of the Night," and Dwight Yoakam's harmonies on "Dirty Life and Times" are the perfect touch for the tune. In terms of material, The Wind isn't a great Zevon album, but it's a pretty good one; "El Amour de Mi Vida" is a simple but affecting look at lost love, "Prison Grove" is a superior character piece about life behind bars, and "Numb as a Statue," "Disorder in the House," and "Dirty Life and Times" prove the prospect of imminent death hasn't alleviated Zevon's cynicism in the least. (It's hard to say if he's being sincere or darkly witty with his cover of "Knockin' on Heaven's Door," though he manages to make it work both ways.) And the assembled musicians -- among them Ry Cooder, David Lindley, Joe Walsh, Don Henley, and Jim Keltner -- serve up their best licks without taking the show away from Zevon, who, despite his obvious weakness, firmly commands the spotlight. The Wind feels less like a grand final statement of Warren Zevon's career than one last walk around the field, with the star nodding to his pals, offering a last look at what he does best, and quietly but firmly leaving listeners convinced that he exits the game with no shame and no regrets. Which, all in all, is a pretty good way to remember the guy. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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CD9,99 €

Pop/Rock - Erschienen am 25. Januar 2000 | Vanguard

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CD16,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Juni 1978 | Rhino - Elektra

"Whiskey, Weed and Warren Zevon", so beschrieb der von David Duchovny in der Serie "Californication" verkörperte Autor Hank Moody gerne seine Vorstellung einer guten Zeit. Es war nicht der einzige Querweis auf den 2003 verstorbenen Sänger, Pianisten und Komponisten Warren Zevon. Man kam als Verehrer Zevons nur schwer darum herum, sich zu freuen, dass Zevon damit ein kleines Stück weit posthume Öffentlichkeit zuteil wird, eine Öffentlichkeit, um die er Zeit seines Lebens kämpfen musste. Zevon hatte zwar Hits, die meisten werden wohl "Werewolves of London" kennen, viele auch durch die scheußliche Verwurstung des Stücks in Kid Rocks unsäglichem "All Summer Long". Aber im Vergleich zu seinen berühmteren Songwriterkollegen blieb Zevon immer mehr ein Geheimtipp – auch wenn ihn Leute wie Dylan oder Springsteen als einen der Größten priesen. Zevon war blitzgescheit, wortgewandt, als Musiker, Bandleader, Komponist und Texter mit Unmengen Talent gesegnet, aber auch von Dämonen geplagt. Ein großer Geschichtenerzähler, dessen Stücke von Outlaws und Kopfgeldjägern, Liebschaften und Spionen, Gestrandeten und Desperados handelten. Messerscharf, augenzwinkernd, doppelbödig. Was bei Zevon wie ein aus dem Ärmel geschüttelter 3:30-Song daherkam, bot lyrisch Stoff für ganze Filme. Zevon trieb Narrative mit der Leichtigkeit grandioser Popsongs in die Zielgerade, egal ob Rock'n'Roll, Boogie, Blues, Country. "Dry your eyes my little friend / Let me take you by the hand / Freddie get ready Rock steady / When Johnny strikes up the band" (aus: "Johnny Strikes Up The Band") "Excitable Boy" war das dritte Album in Zevons Karriere, produziert von seinem Freund und Förderer Jackson Browne. Es zeigt Zevons Musik in seiner ganzen Pracht. Zevon wusste, was er musikalisch tat. Er hatte als Werbejingle-Komponist gearbeitet, als Bandleader bei den Everly Brothers. Er war Studiomusiker, Sessionmusiker – und als ihm alles zu sehr gegen den Strich ging, zog er nach Spanien und begann dort, regelmäßig in einer Bar zu spielen. Der Barchef: ein ehemaliger Söldner, mit dem er schließlich das Stück "Roland The Headless Thompson Gunner" komponierte. "Roland was a warrior / From the Land of the Midnight Sun / With a Thompson Gun for hire / Fighting to be done / The deal was made in Denmark / On a dark and stormy day / So he set out for Biafra / To join the bloody fray" heißt es in dem Stück. Es ist einer der Klassiker Zevons, wie einige Stücke auf "Excitable Boy" essentielle Wegpfeiler in seinem Schaffen sind. Mal macht es den Anschein, Zevons Erzählungen fußen im Pantheon der Folksongs, dann wieder wirken sie wie abgebrühte Roadmovies wie zum Beispiel "Lawyers, Guns & Money". "Well, I went home with the waitress / The way I always do How was I to know / She was with the Russians, too / I was gambling in Havana / I took a little risk / Send lawyers, guns and money / Dad, get me out of this". Schicke Anwälte, Knarren und Geld, die Scheiße ist am Dampfen. "Excitable Boy" glänzt mit 1970er-Pop-Harmonien und Kadenzen, ist gleichermaßen bissig wie eingängig. Es war nur gerecht, dass Zevon mit diesem Album verdiente Erfolge feierte. Im Januar 2018 wird "Excitable Boy" 40 Jahre alt. Ein guter Grund, sich an den großen Songschreiber und Performer Warren Zevon zu erinnern. © Laut
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CD13,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1987 | Virgin

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CD16,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 26. März 2007 | Rhino - Elektra

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CD16,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 16. Juni 1992 | Rhino - Elektra

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CD16,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 7. Oktober 1986 | Rhino - Elektra

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CD16,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 7. November 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

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CD16,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 26. März 2007 | Rhino - Elektra

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CD16,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 7. November 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

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CD9,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 26. August 2003 | IndieBlu Music

In late August of 2002, Warren Zevon was diagnosed with mesothelioma, a virulent and inoperable form of lung cancer; with his life expectancy expected to be no more than a few months, Zevon focused his dwindling energies on completing a final album, and The Wind, released a year after Zevon learned of his condition, was the result. With a back story like that, it's all but impossible to ignore the subtext of Zevon's mortality while listening to The Wind, though, thankfully, he's opted not to make an album about illness or death (ironically, he already did that with 2000's Life'll Kill Ya) or create a musical last will and testament. While The Wind occasionally and obliquely touches on Zevon's illness -- most notably the mournful "Keep Me in Your Heart" and the dirty blues raunch of "Rub Me Raw" -- in many ways it sounds like a fairly typical Warren Zevon album, though of course this time out the caustic wit cuts a bit deeper, the screeds against a world gone mad sound more woeful, and the love songs suggest higher emotional stakes than before. The Wind also lays in a higher compliment of celebrity guest stars than usual, and while obviously a lot of these folks are old friends wanting to help a pal in need, in some cases the ringers help to carry the weight for Zevon, who, while in good voice, can't summon up the power he did in his salad days. And remarkably, the trick works on several cuts; Bruce Springsteen's rollicking guest vocal on "Disorder in the House" offers just the kick the tune needed, Tom Petty's laid-back smirk brings a sleazy undertow to "The Rest of the Night," and Dwight Yoakam's harmonies on "Dirty Life and Times" are the perfect touch for the tune. In terms of material, The Wind isn't a great Zevon album, but it's a pretty good one; "El Amour de Mi Vida" is a simple but affecting look at lost love, "Prison Grove" is a superior character piece about life behind bars, and "Numb as a Statue," "Disorder in the House," and "Dirty Life and Times" prove the prospect of imminent death hasn't alleviated Zevon's cynicism in the least. (It's hard to say if he's being sincere or darkly witty with his cover of "Knockin' on Heaven's Door," though he manages to make it work both ways.) And the assembled musicians -- among them Ry Cooder, David Lindley, Joe Walsh, Don Henley, and Jim Keltner -- serve up their best licks without taking the show away from Zevon, who, despite his obvious weakness, firmly commands the spotlight. The Wind feels less like a grand final statement of Warren Zevon's career than one last walk around the field, with the star nodding to his pals, offering a last look at what he does best, and quietly but firmly leaving listeners convinced that he exits the game with no shame and no regrets. Which, all in all, is a pretty good way to remember the guy. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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CD9,99 €

Pop/Rock - Erschienen am 7. Mai 2002 | Vanguard

Warren Zevon is famous for black-hearted comedy tunes like "Werewolves of London" and "Excitable Boy," but his best work is a good bit deeper and more penetrating, and 2000's Life'll Kill Ya was an impressive return to form, a song cycle about aging and death that was played less for easy laughs than for the bitter humor derived from the knowledge that no one, the artist included, will get out of this world alive. Unfortunately, Zevon's follow-up, 2002's My Ride's Here, for the most part recalls second-tier Zevon albums like Mr. Bad Example or Mutineer; the jokes tend to be a bit obvious, the more introspective moments don't connect the way one might hope; and the music often lacks the physical or emotional strength to bring these songs across. (It doesn't help that Zevon sounds a bit bored or distracted on much of this set.) My Ride's Here also finds Zevon collaborating with a number of writers from outside the world of music (not the first time he's done this; novelist Tom McGuane co-wrote "The Overdraft" on Envoy), but the results are not especially encouraging. Novelist Carl Hiaasen co-wrote "Basket Case," an ode to an insane girlfriend that's one of the least effective tunes on the album, and while gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson struggles to make "You're a Whole Different Person When You're Scared" sound ominous, the results fall flat. Sportswriter Mitch Albom, of all people, turns in the best collaboration on the album; if there isn't much depth or subtlety to "Hit Somebody! (The Hockey Song)," at least the jokes are funny and the narrative holds together (and that's David Letterman providing the voice of the obnoxious fan). The sardonic "Genius" and "Sacrificial Lambs," and the title cut -- a meditation on mortality that would have fit in on Life'll Kill Ya -- are strong enough to remind listeners of just how talented Zevon still is, but for the most part My Ride's Here is a misfire from an artist capable of much better work. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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CD16,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 10. Juni 2008 | Rhino - Warner Records

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CD27,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 11. Dezember 2015 | Rhino

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CD19,49 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2003 | Capitol Records

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CD9,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 7. Mai 2002 | IndieBlu Music

Warren Zevon is famous for black-hearted comedy tunes like "Werewolves of London" and "Excitable Boy," but his best work is a good bit deeper and more penetrating, and 2000's Life'll Kill Ya was an impressive return to form, a song cycle about aging and death that was played less for easy laughs than for the bitter humor derived from the knowledge that no one, the artist included, will get out of this world alive. Unfortunately, Zevon's follow-up, 2002's My Ride's Here, for the most part recalls second-tier Zevon albums like Mr. Bad Example or Mutineer; the jokes tend to be a bit obvious, the more introspective moments don't connect the way one might hope; and the music often lacks the physical or emotional strength to bring these songs across. (It doesn't help that Zevon sounds a bit bored or distracted on much of this set.) My Ride's Here also finds Zevon collaborating with a number of writers from outside the world of music (not the first time he's done this; novelist Tom McGuane co-wrote "The Overdraft" on Envoy), but the results are not especially encouraging. Novelist Carl Hiaasen co-wrote "Basket Case," an ode to an insane girlfriend that's one of the least effective tunes on the album, and while gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson struggles to make "You're a Whole Different Person When You're Scared" sound ominous, the results fall flat. Sportswriter Mitch Albom, of all people, turns in the best collaboration on the album; if there isn't much depth or subtlety to "Hit Somebody! (The Hockey Song)," at least the jokes are funny and the narrative holds together (and that's David Letterman providing the voice of the obnoxious fan). The sardonic "Genius" and "Sacrificial Lambs," and the title cut -- a meditation on mortality that would have fit in on Life'll Kill Ya -- are strong enough to remind listeners of just how talented Zevon still is, but for the most part My Ride's Here is a misfire from an artist capable of much better work. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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CD8,49 €

Rock - Erschienen am 16. September 2016 | Live Wire