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Soul - Erschienen am 28. August 1973 | Motown

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Soul - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2001 | Motown

Auszeichnungen Qobuz' Schallplattensammlung - Qobuz Referenz
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Soul - Erschienen am 8. Dezember 1972 | Motown

Auszeichnungen Qobuz' Schallplattensammlung - Qobuz Referenz
In 1972, things were rapidly shifting in Marvin Gaye's world. He was coming off of one of his most wide-reaching hit albums with 1971's instant classic What's Going On, and his recording contract with Motown subsidiary Tamla was renewed for a cool million dollars and total creative control, making him one of the most successful R&B artists of his day. With Motown's offices migrating west from Detroit to Los Angeles, Gaye followed suit, beginning work on Trouble Man, both the score to a blaxploitation film of the same name and the soundtrack that would be his next album. With minimal singing (Gaye sings through only the title track, adding fragmentary vocalizations minimally throughout the rest of the album), Gaye wrote, arranged, and conducted the entire soundtrack, working with both Motown players and a full orchestra over the course of its recording. It's been speculated by some that Trouble Man was a concerted effort to move away from the expectations of a carbon-copy follow-up to the almost immeasurably high standards of What's Going On, but it's best to look at the record as an entity unto itself rather than the next Marvin Gaye album in the chain. Though largely absent of his one-of-a-kind vocal presence, the arrangements are richer and more sophisticated than the majority of early blaxploitation fare, with some of the same theatricality and filmic urgency of the best Morricone or David Axelrod soundtracks. With instrumentation more ambitious than even the enormity of What's Going On, Trouble Man never stays in one place for long. "'T' Plays It Cool" paints a hustling cityscape with its solid beat and nervous synthesizer bubbles. Plaintive sax trades verses with rudimentary keyboards and Marvin's soulful wails on "Life Is a Gamble," and mournful passages of chamber strings give way to bounding funk grooves. Isaac Hayes' Shaft soundtrack would become debatably more widely remembered than the movie it scored, and Curtis Mayfield's Superfly soundtrack had a similar reception. Likewise, Trouble Man the soundtrack album outperformed Trouble Man the movie by leaps and bounds, enjoying Top 20 chart success in its day while the movie sank rapidly into obscurity. Looking at the album outside the trends of its era and inward to the art that Gaye was sculpting shows Trouble Man as a mostly wordless statement on the rapidly changing times for both young black America and Marvin's personal life. The compositions well over with equal parts tension and detached cool, moving through modes of heartbreaking struggle, searching wonder, and playful street scenes. While it's been relegated to the lesser status of Gaye's one-off blaxploitation soundtrack, it rises far above the wandering wah-wah guitars and dated bongos of its peers. Trouble Man might not be as immediate or universally relatable as Gaye's soul-searching on What's Going On or his later sensual fixations, but a deep listen will show it's very much part of the same overarching genius that touched all of his work. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Soul - Erschienen am 21. Mai 1971 | Motown

Hi-Res Auszeichnungen Qobuz' Schallplattensammlung
Während am 21. Mai 1971 die Plattenläden das neue Album What's Going On Marvin Gayes' in die Regale räumen, bedeutet dies nicht nur eine Wendung in der Geschichte der Soul Musik, sondern in der gesamten populären Musik...In einigen Zeilen des amerikanischen Magazins Rolling Stone beschreibt Marvin Gaye ganz klar seine Intentionen: "1969 und 1970 habe ich begonnen, das Konzept neu zu bewerten, was ich mit meiner Musik aussagen möchte...ich war von den Briefen, die mir mein Bruder aus Vietnam schickte, sehr betroffen, wie auch von der sozialen Situation dieses Landes. Mir wurde bewusst, dass ich meine eigenen Fantasien beiseite schieben muss, wenn ich Songs schreiben möchte, die die Seele der Menschen berührt. Ich wollte also, dass sie realisieren, was die Welt bewegte." Dieses Album mit dem Titel What’s Going On ist heute eines der größten aus dem Hause Motown. Während seiner Produktion wird das Wort "Konflikt" zwischen dem Sänger und dem Produktionsdirektor des Labels (übrigens sein Schwager) großgeschrieben. Gordy versteht den radikalen Kurswechsel Marvin Gayes nur ansatzweise. Bewusst ein Album in der Phase sozialer Umbrüche, ein Opus, das von Drogen, Arbeitslosigkeit, Ökologie, Krieg und Misere handelt in den Glanzjahren seines künstlerischen und wirschaftlichen Erfolgs herauszubringen, hielt er für falsch. Kurz, für Berry Gordy war What’s Going On nicht Motown! Marvin Gaye konnte seinen Arbeitgeber aber davon überzeugen und veröffentlichte das Album am 21. Mai 1971. In nur 35 Minuten (die großen Pop-Platten dürfen diese Zeitvorgabe nicht überschreiten) umgibt Marvin Gaye seine Soul-Hits mit einer Aura von Streichern und Hall. Mit einem betäubten Traumgefühl setzt er seine samtweiche Stimme über ausgewählte und pointierte Textzeilen einer wahren Prosa, die wie ein Spiegel der Zeit funktioniert. Mit Klasse, Feingefühl und Nüchternheit bewegen sich seine Texte weder im Aktivismus noch in der Albernheit und stets mit dem Gedanken daran, dass dieses Konzept-Album mühelos etwas bewirken wird...Wie durch einen Aufschrei versetzt der Titel What’s Going On (Was ist nur los) durch die mit Percussions gesprengelten Rhythmen in Trance. Inner City Blues ist ebenfalls dieser hypnotische Soul wie aus Schichten von Echo und wohlklingender Töne und begegnet jeder Gewalt mit dieser zehnfach stärkeren Kraft. Es ist der Walzer zwischen herrschender Barbarei und sinnlicher, rhythmischer Symphonie, der aus diesem Album eine wahres Denkmal machte und das heute immer noch nicht baufällig geworden ist. © MZ/Qobuz     
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Soul - Erschienen am 1. Oktober 1982 | Columbia - Legacy

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Soul - Erschienen am 15. Dezember 1978 | Motown

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Pre-dating the voyeuristic tendencies of reality television by 20 years, Here, My Dear is the sound of divorce on record -- exposed in all of its tender-nerve glory for the world to consume. During the amazing success of I Want You and his stellar Live at the London Palladium album, Marvin Gaye was served with divorce papers from his then-wife Anna Gordy Gaye (sister of Motown Records founder Berry Gordy). One of the conditions of the settlement was that Gordy Gaye would receive an extensive percentage of royalties as well as a portion of the advance for his next album. Initially, Gaye was contemplating giving less than his best effort, as he wouldn't stand to receive any money, but then reconsidered at the last moment. The result is a two-disc-long confessional on the deterioration of their marriage; starting from the opening notes of the title track, Gaye viciously cuts with every lyric deeper into an explanation of why the relationship died the way it did. Gaye uses the album, right down to its packaging, to exorcise his personal demons with subtle visual digs and less-than-subtle lyrical attacks. The inner sleeve had a pseudo-board-game-like illustration entitled "Judgment," in which a man's hand passes a record to a woman's. One side of the sleeve has Gaye's music and recording equipment, while the other side of the board included jewelry and other luxurious amenities. Musically the album retains the high standards Gaye set in the early '70s, but you can hear the agonizing strain of recent events in his voice, to the point where even several vocal overdubs can't save his delivery. Stripped to its bare essence, Here, My Dear is no less than brilliantly unsettling and a perfect cauterization to a decade filled with personal turmoil. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
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Soul - Erschienen am 12. Mai 1989 | Columbia

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Soul - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1997 | Motown

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Soul - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1981 | Motown

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Soul - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2005 | Hip-O Select

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Soul - Erschienen am 8. Dezember 1972 | UNI - MOTOWN

Auszeichnungen Qobuz' Schallplattensammlung
In 1972, things were rapidly shifting in Marvin Gaye's world. He was coming off of one of his most wide-reaching hit albums with 1971's instant classic What's Going On, and his recording contract with Motown subsidiary Tamla was renewed for a cool million dollars and total creative control, making him one of the most successful R&B artists of his day. With Motown's offices migrating west from Detroit to Los Angeles, Gaye followed suit, beginning work on Trouble Man, both the score to a blaxploitation film of the same name and the soundtrack that would be his next album. With minimal singing (Gaye sings through only the title track, adding fragmentary vocalizations minimally throughout the rest of the album), Gaye wrote, arranged, and conducted the entire soundtrack, working with both Motown players and a full orchestra over the course of its recording. It's been speculated by some that Trouble Man was a concerted effort to move away from the expectations of a carbon-copy follow-up to the almost immeasurably high standards of What's Going On, but it's best to look at the record as an entity unto itself rather than the next Marvin Gaye album in the chain. Though largely absent of his one-of-a-kind vocal presence, the arrangements are richer and more sophisticated than the majority of early blaxploitation fare, with some of the same theatricality and filmic urgency of the best Morricone or David Axelrod soundtracks. With instrumentation more ambitious than even the enormity of What's Going On, Trouble Man never stays in one place for long. "'T' Plays It Cool" paints a hustling cityscape with its solid beat and nervous synthesizer bubbles. Plaintive sax trades verses with rudimentary keyboards and Marvin's soulful wails on "Life Is a Gamble," and mournful passages of chamber strings give way to bounding funk grooves. Isaac Hayes' Shaft soundtrack would become debatably more widely remembered than the movie it scored, and Curtis Mayfield's Superfly soundtrack had a similar reception. Likewise, Trouble Man the soundtrack album outperformed Trouble Man the movie by leaps and bounds, enjoying Top 20 chart success in its day while the movie sank rapidly into obscurity. Looking at the album outside the trends of its era and inward to the art that Gaye was sculpting shows Trouble Man as a mostly wordless statement on the rapidly changing times for both young black America and Marvin's personal life. The compositions well over with equal parts tension and detached cool, moving through modes of heartbreaking struggle, searching wonder, and playful street scenes. While it's been relegated to the lesser status of Gaye's one-off blaxploitation soundtrack, it rises far above the wandering wah-wah guitars and dated bongos of its peers. Trouble Man might not be as immediate or universally relatable as Gaye's soul-searching on What's Going On or his later sensual fixations, but a deep listen will show it's very much part of the same overarching genius that touched all of his work. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Soul - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2002 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Soul - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2009 | Universal Music Enterprises

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Soul - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2014 | Motown

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Soul - Erschienen am 16. März 1976 | Motown

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I Want You, while it a Top Ten smash for Marvin Gaye in 1976, is not as generally as well-known as its predecessors for several reasons. First, it marked a sharp change in direction, leaving his trademark Motown soul for lush, funky, breezy disco. Secondly, its subject matter is as close to explicit as pop records got in 1976. Third, Gaye hadn't recorded in nearly three years and critics were onto something else -- exactly what, in retrospect is anybody's guess. From the amazing Ernie Barnes cover painting "Back to Sugar Shack" to the Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson string and horn arrangements to Leon Ware's exotic production that relied on keyboards as well as drums and basses as rhythm instruments, I Want You was a giant leap for Gaye. The feel of the album was one of late-night parties in basements and small clubs, and the intimacy of the music evokes the image of people getting closer as every hour of a steamy night wears on. But the most astonishing things about I Want You are its intimacy (it was dedicated to and recorded in front of Gaye's future second wife, Jan), silky elegance, and seamless textures. Gaye worked with producer Leon Ware, who wrote all of the original songs on the album and worked with Gaye to revise them, thus lending Gaye a co-writing credit. The title track is a monster two-step groover with hand percussion playing counterpoint to the strings and horns layered in against a spare electric guitar solo, all before Gaye begins to sing on top of the funky backbeat. It's a party anthem to be sure, and one that evokes the vulnerability that a man in love displays when the object of his affection is in plain sight. Art Stewart's engineering rounds off all the edges and makes Gaye's already sweet crooning instrument into the true grain in the voice of seductive need. "Feel All My Love Inside" and "I Want to Be Where You Are" are anthems to sensuality with strings creeping up under Gaye's voice as the guitars move through a series of chunky changes and drums punctuate his every syllable. In all, the original album is a suite to the bedroom, one in which a man tells his woman all of his sexual aspirations because of his love for her. The entire album has been referenced by everyone from Mary J. Blige to D'Angelo to Chico DeBarge and even Todd Rundgren, who performed the title track live regularly. By the time it is over, the listener should be a blissed-out, brimming container for amorous hunger. I Want You and its companion, Ware's Musical Massage, are the pre-eminent early disco concept albums. They are adult albums about intimacy, sensuality, and commitment, and decades later they still reverberate with class, sincerity, grace, intense focus, and astonishingly good taste. I Want You is as necessary as anything Gaye ever recorded. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Soul - Erschienen am 8. Dezember 1972 | Motown

Hi-Res
In 1972, things were rapidly shifting in Marvin Gaye's world. He was coming off of one of his most wide-reaching hit albums with 1971's instant classic What's Going On, and his recording contract with Motown subsidiary Tamla was renewed for a cool million dollars and total creative control, making him one of the most successful R&B artists of his day. With Motown's offices migrating west from Detroit to Los Angeles, Gaye followed suit, beginning work on Trouble Man, both the score to a blaxploitation film of the same name and the soundtrack that would be his next album. With minimal singing (Gaye sings through only the title track, adding fragmentary vocalizations minimally throughout the rest of the album), Gaye wrote, arranged, and conducted the entire soundtrack, working with both Motown players and a full orchestra over the course of its recording. It's been speculated by some that Trouble Man was a concerted effort to move away from the expectations of a carbon-copy follow-up to the almost immeasurably high standards of What's Going On, but it's best to look at the record as an entity unto itself rather than the next Marvin Gaye album in the chain. Though largely absent of his one-of-a-kind vocal presence, the arrangements are richer and more sophisticated than the majority of early blaxploitation fare, with some of the same theatricality and filmic urgency of the best Morricone or David Axelrod soundtracks. With instrumentation more ambitious than even the enormity of What's Going On, Trouble Man never stays in one place for long. "'T' Plays It Cool" paints a hustling cityscape with its solid beat and nervous synthesizer bubbles. Plaintive sax trades verses with rudimentary keyboards and Marvin's soulful wails on "Life Is a Gamble," and mournful passages of chamber strings give way to bounding funk grooves. Isaac Hayes' Shaft soundtrack would become debatably more widely remembered than the movie it scored, and Curtis Mayfield's Superfly soundtrack had a similar reception. Likewise, Trouble Man the soundtrack album outperformed Trouble Man the movie by leaps and bounds, enjoying Top 20 chart success in its day while the movie sank rapidly into obscurity. Looking at the album outside the trends of its era and inward to the art that Gaye was sculpting shows Trouble Man as a mostly wordless statement on the rapidly changing times for both young black America and Marvin's personal life. The compositions well over with equal parts tension and detached cool, moving through modes of heartbreaking struggle, searching wonder, and playful street scenes. While it's been relegated to the lesser status of Gaye's one-off blaxploitation soundtrack, it rises far above the wandering wah-wah guitars and dated bongos of its peers. Trouble Man might not be as immediate or universally relatable as Gaye's soul-searching on What's Going On or his later sensual fixations, but a deep listen will show it's very much part of the same overarching genius that touched all of his work. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Soul - Erschienen am 29. März 2019 | Motown

Das Wort "unveröffentlicht" an den Namen von Marvin Gaye anzuhängen, ist häufig zu einer leichtfertigen Gewohnheit geworden. Bereits als die Deluxe Edition von What's Going On, Let's Get It On oder auch Hear, My Dear veröffentlicht wurden, kamen Fans des 1984 verstorbenen Soul Meisters mit vielen alternativen und anderen neuen Aufnahmen auf ihre Kosten. Dieses Mal ist You're the Man, das 2019 erscheint, eine Art Gral, der endlich ausgegraben wurde. Als er im Mai 1971 What's Going On veröffentlichte, stellte Marvin Gaye die Soulmusik und Motown auf den Kopf, aber auch die Geschichte der Popmusik im Allgemeinen. Mit seinem Meisterwerk zwingt er Berry Gordy, den Chef des Labels, sich dem vietnamesischen Konflikt, den Spannungen zwischen den Rassen und der Degradierung der amerikanischen Metropolen zu stellen. Zum ersten Mal ist eine Motown-Platte anders gestaltet, ohne Gordys totale Kontrolle, und beschäftigt sich mit sozialen Fragen und nicht mit schönen Liebesliedern. Marvin Gaye, der Entertainer, wird zu einer politischen und sozialen Stimme. Nach What's Going On begann der Star mit der Arbeit an einem neuen Album mit dem Titel You're the Man, angekündigt von der gleichnamigen Single, einer Anklage gegen den damaligen republikanischen Präsidenten Richard Nixon. Ein Angriff, der nicht nach Gordy's Geschmack ist, der sich nach der Zustimmung zur Veröffentlichung der Single weigert, mit dem Album fortzufahren. Er überredete sogar den Sänger, seine Pläne zu ändern.Einige für You're the Man geplante Songs werden hier und da auf einigen seiner zukünftigen Aufnahmen zu finden sein. Die Version von 2019 bietet endlich das komplette Album, von dem Marvin Gaye träumte. Eine Auferstehung, die umso erfreulicher ist, als dass man inmitten der Präsidentschaft von Donald Trump Texte wie We don't want to hear more lies / About how you plan to economise wiedererkennt. Nach all den Jahren schreit einem die Modernität dieses konzipierten Werks geradezu ins Gesicht. Schwarz sein unter Nixon oder Trump, gleicher Kampf! Und mit We Can Make It Baby ist die feministische Sequenz auch da! Was die Produktion betrifft wechselt der Marvin Gaye des You're The Man zwischen dem, was er auf What's Going On vorgeschlagen hat, und dem Soundtrack des 1973 veröffentlichten Films Trouble Man. Seine Stimme gleitet perfekt auf einer Instrumentierung zwischen groovigem Soul und leichtem Funk. Es sei darauf hingewiesen, dass Motown zur Homogenisierung all dessen auf Salaam Remi zurückgriff, der für seine Zusammenarbeit mit Nas, Amy Winehouse, den Fugees oder Miguel bekannt ist. Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Soul - Erschienen am 22. Januar 2021 | UNI - MOTOWN

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Soul - Erschienen am 1. August 1968 | Motown

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Soul - Erschienen am 8. Dezember 1972 | UNI - MOTOWN

Hi-Res
In 1972, things were rapidly shifting in Marvin Gaye's world. He was coming off of one of his most wide-reaching hit albums with 1971's instant classic What's Going On, and his recording contract with Motown subsidiary Tamla was renewed for a cool million dollars and total creative control, making him one of the most successful R&B artists of his day. With Motown's offices migrating west from Detroit to Los Angeles, Gaye followed suit, beginning work on Trouble Man, both the score to a blaxploitation film of the same name and the soundtrack that would be his next album. With minimal singing (Gaye sings through only the title track, adding fragmentary vocalizations minimally throughout the rest of the album), Gaye wrote, arranged, and conducted the entire soundtrack, working with both Motown players and a full orchestra over the course of its recording. It's been speculated by some that Trouble Man was a concerted effort to move away from the expectations of a carbon-copy follow-up to the almost immeasurably high standards of What's Going On, but it's best to look at the record as an entity unto itself rather than the next Marvin Gaye album in the chain. Though largely absent of his one-of-a-kind vocal presence, the arrangements are richer and more sophisticated than the majority of early blaxploitation fare, with some of the same theatricality and filmic urgency of the best Morricone or David Axelrod soundtracks. With instrumentation more ambitious than even the enormity of What's Going On, Trouble Man never stays in one place for long. "'T' Plays It Cool" paints a hustling cityscape with its solid beat and nervous synthesizer bubbles. Plaintive sax trades verses with rudimentary keyboards and Marvin's soulful wails on "Life Is a Gamble," and mournful passages of chamber strings give way to bounding funk grooves. Isaac Hayes' Shaft soundtrack would become debatably more widely remembered than the movie it scored, and Curtis Mayfield's Superfly soundtrack had a similar reception. Likewise, Trouble Man the soundtrack album outperformed Trouble Man the movie by leaps and bounds, enjoying Top 20 chart success in its day while the movie sank rapidly into obscurity. Looking at the album outside the trends of its era and inward to the art that Gaye was sculpting shows Trouble Man as a mostly wordless statement on the rapidly changing times for both young black America and Marvin's personal life. The compositions well over with equal parts tension and detached cool, moving through modes of heartbreaking struggle, searching wonder, and playful street scenes. While it's been relegated to the lesser status of Gaye's one-off blaxploitation soundtrack, it rises far above the wandering wah-wah guitars and dated bongos of its peers. Trouble Man might not be as immediate or universally relatable as Gaye's soul-searching on What's Going On or his later sensual fixations, but a deep listen will show it's very much part of the same overarching genius that touched all of his work. © Fred Thomas /TiVo