Ihr Warenkorb ist leer!

Genre :

Ähnliche Künstler

Die Alben

Ab
HI-RES21,49 €
CD14,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 17. April 2020 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Hi-Res
Ab
HI-RES21,49 €
CD14,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 17. April 2020 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Hi-Res
Since 2016, a breath of fresh air has been sweeping across Cleveland, and it goes by the name of DaBaby. That being said, the hype surrounding the rapper became more of a tornado after the release of his second album, Kirk, in 2019 and by the turn of the year, his new music was so highly anticipated that Blame It On Baby reached a jaw-dropping number of plays in less than an hour. Given that the pressure was on for this album the rapper knew he needed to collaborate with some big names and his line-up certainly doesn’t disappoint. Featuring the likes of Future, Quavo, Roddy Ricch, A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie, R&B veteran Ashanti and Megan Thee Stallion, this dream team has taken one of the hottest rap artists in the game to the next level. Blame It On Baby sticks to the familiar style of dark trap beats and self-absorbed verses and the guests, except perhaps Boogie Wit Da Hoodie and Ashanti, provide the contrast. The gems in this album are TALK ABOUT IT, DROP and the brilliant NASTY, which stand out next to the very kitsch FIND MY WAY and the generic SAD SH*T. But DaBaby has taken the next step of his evolution and that’s the main thing. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
Ab
CD13,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 1. März 2019 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Ab
CD14,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 27. September 2019 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Transforming from an underground crooner to a Top Ten-charting rapper in just over a year, Charlotte MC DaBaby's rise has been nothing but meteoric. Every part the genuine article, the rapper blends cockiness, charm, and humor into a vibrant persona, a recipient of the crowd-winning charisma of artists like Missy Elliott and Ski Mask the Slump God. When paired with impressive technical skill and a clear musical vision, DaBaby's success seemed inevitable, and this winning formula has produced some of the most infectious rap of 2019 so far. Yet there can always be too much of a good thing; with 12 mixtapes and two albums released in just three years, the rapper needed to find a way to keep things fresh. Unfortunately, his sophomore album, Kirk, comes as a mixed bag. Despite adding some newfound perks to Baby's production, the album's rehashed lyrics and flows give Kirk an air of stagnation. DaBaby's best material has typically been scored by bouncy, electronic-led loops. "Taking It Out" would have lacked oomph without its breakneck-paced production, while the piano-like warbles of "Gorilla Glu" lent it a menacing swagger. Though we see this mimicked to varying degrees of success in Kirk's "Vibez" and "Raw Shit," there's some refreshing variation, too. Along with expressive pianos on "Gospel" and a club-inspired bounce on "Really," eighth track "Toes" treats us to some Wild West-inspired trap. While production is certainly one of the project's stronger points, missteps are equally frequent. The bass on "Off the Rip" is painfully bland, and the strings of "Prolly Heard" have been far better employed on tracks like Gunna's "Who You Foolin" and Higher Brothers' "Wudidong." Of course, a DaBaby release comes with a certain set of lyrical staples: charismatic boasts come with reassuring regularity, and there are enough "jit"s and "ain't no cap in my rap"s to bring the record back home. Given the right production, Baby's charisma can carry them forward, with "Toes" and "There He Go" landing firmly in the upper ranks of his catalog. Yet we often see Baby struggle to sustain Kirk's longer tracks; recycled flows and repetitive lyrics drain the life from "Bop" and "Raw Shit" in particular. Despite Kirk's reliance on repetition, there is one utterly unique track here: "Intro." Discarding Baby's blanket braggadocio and style, the song is his most personal work to date. Amid descriptions of his mother's battle with cancer and his own internalized misery, he reflects on the death of his father with the cutting "How the f*ck I make it to the top, same day I lost the n*gga that had me?" But one stellar track does not a stellar album make. Despite the singular brilliance of "Intro" (and some standout bangers in "Toes," "There He Go," and "XXL"), most of the project falls into mediocrity. While newer production tricks add some kick to DaBaby's formula, stagnant lyrics and monotonous flows present him as an artist unwilling to change; swamped by slushy imitations of his best work, the gems on Kirk aren't given the platform to shine. © David Crone /TiVo
Ab
HI-RES30,99 €
CD21,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 17. April 2020 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Hi-Res
Ab
HI-RES21,49 €
CD14,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 27. September 2019 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Hi-Res
Transforming from an underground crooner to a Top Ten-charting rapper in just over a year, Charlotte MC DaBaby's rise has been nothing but meteoric. Every part the genuine article, the rapper blends cockiness, charm, and humor into a vibrant persona, a recipient of the crowd-winning charisma of artists like Missy Elliott and Ski Mask the Slump God. When paired with impressive technical skill and a clear musical vision, DaBaby's success seemed inevitable, and this winning formula has produced some of the most infectious rap of 2019 so far. Yet there can always be too much of a good thing; with 12 mixtapes and two albums released in just three years, the rapper needed to find a way to keep things fresh. Unfortunately, his sophomore album, Kirk, comes as a mixed bag. Despite adding some newfound perks to Baby's production, the album's rehashed lyrics and flows give Kirk an air of stagnation. DaBaby's best material has typically been scored by bouncy, electronic-led loops. "Taking It Out" would have lacked oomph without its breakneck-paced production, while the piano-like warbles of "Gorilla Glu" lent it a menacing swagger. Though we see this mimicked to varying degrees of success in Kirk's "Vibez" and "Raw Shit," there's some refreshing variation, too. Along with expressive pianos on "Gospel" and a club-inspired bounce on "Really," eighth track "Toes" treats us to some Wild West-inspired trap. While production is certainly one of the project's stronger points, missteps are equally frequent. The bass on "Off the Rip" is painfully bland, and the strings of "Prolly Heard" have been far better employed on tracks like Gunna's "Who You Foolin" and Higher Brothers' "Wudidong." Of course, a DaBaby release comes with a certain set of lyrical staples: charismatic boasts come with reassuring regularity, and there are enough "jit"s and "ain't no cap in my rap"s to bring the record back home. Given the right production, Baby's charisma can carry them forward, with "Toes" and "There He Go" landing firmly in the upper ranks of his catalog. Yet we often see Baby struggle to sustain Kirk's longer tracks; recycled flows and repetitive lyrics drain the life from "Bop" and "Raw Shit" in particular. Despite Kirk's reliance on repetition, there is one utterly unique track here: "Intro." Discarding Baby's blanket braggadocio and style, the song is his most personal work to date. Amid descriptions of his mother's battle with cancer and his own internalized misery, he reflects on the death of his father with the cutting "How the f*ck I make it to the top, same day I lost the n*gga that had me?" But one stellar track does not a stellar album make. Despite the singular brilliance of "Intro" (and some standout bangers in "Toes," "There He Go," and "XXL"), most of the project falls into mediocrity. While newer production tricks add some kick to DaBaby's formula, stagnant lyrics and monotonous flows present him as an artist unwilling to change; swamped by slushy imitations of his best work, the gems on Kirk aren't given the platform to shine. © David Crone /TiVo
Ab
CD21,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 17. April 2020 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Ab
CD1,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 12. Juni 2020 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Ab
CD14,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 17. April 2020 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Ab
HI-RES21,49 €
CD14,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 20. November 2020 | South Coast Music - Interscope PS

Hi-Res
Rap superhero DaBaby became famous for his larger-than-life personality and an infectious rhyme style defined by cartoonish confidence and an air of lighthearted excitement. His seven-song EP My Brother's Keeper (Long Live G), however, is a completely different side of the rapper, sadly inspired by his brother Glen Johnson's suicide in November of 2020. Before this project, DaBaby rarely rapped about anything even remotely serious, but these heart-wrenching songs go deep into inspecting the complex feelings associated with this loss. Opening track "Brother's Keeper" cuts directly to the point, with pained bars about mental health, depression, grief, and picking up the pieces. DaBaby doesn't shift the musical energy of his previous material, even while his lyrics are focused on despair. It's an interesting experience to hear banging, uptempo instrumentals and DaBaby's patented fast and rowdy flows applied to crushing lyrics about crying with his nieces at the hospital as his brother died. Several friends contribute solid features (Polo G and NoCap on "Hangun," Meek Mill on "8 Figures"), but they're outshined by the weight of sadness and complex emotions that billow out of every performance DaBaby gives on these songs. While not overly somber or in keeping with the usual drained, broken delivery that often accompanies albums about death, My Brother's Keeper (Long Live G) is all the more genuine for it. Even in the depths of personal tragedy, DaBaby is still doing what he does best, attacking his songs about losing his bother with all the voracity and muscle he brings to his dumbest party-starting tracks. The vulnerability of the songs adds an unforeseen dimension to what felt before like simple formulaic fun, and results in what's easily the most honest and searing music DaBaby has made. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
Ab
HI-RES2,99 €
CD1,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 25. Juni 2021 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Hi-Res
Ab
HI-RES2,99 €
CD1,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 18. Juni 2021 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Hi-Res
Ab
HI-RES2,99 €
CD1,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 15. Januar 2021 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Hi-Res
Ab
CD14,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 2. November 2018 | South Coast Music Group LLC, distributed by Interscope Records

Ab
CD21,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 4. August 2020 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Ab
HI-RES2,99 €
CD1,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 12. Juni 2020 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Hi-Res
Ab
HI-RES30,99 €
CD21,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 4. August 2020 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Hi-Res
Ab
CD14,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 20. November 2017 | South Coast Music Group, LLC, distributed by Interscope Records

Ab
HI-RES2,99 €
CD1,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 15. Januar 2021 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Hi-Res
Ab
HI-RES21,49 €
CD14,99 €

Hip-Hop/Rap - Erschienen am 27. September 2019 | South Coast Music Group - Interscope Records

Hi-Res
Transforming from an underground crooner to a Top Ten-charting rapper in just over a year, Charlotte MC DaBaby's rise has been nothing but meteoric. Every part the genuine article, the rapper blends cockiness, charm, and humor into a vibrant persona, a recipient of the crowd-winning charisma of artists like Missy Elliott and Ski Mask the Slump God. When paired with impressive technical skill and a clear musical vision, DaBaby's success seemed inevitable, and this winning formula has produced some of the most infectious rap of 2019 so far. Yet there can always be too much of a good thing; with 12 mixtapes and two albums released in just three years, the rapper needed to find a way to keep things fresh. Unfortunately, his sophomore album, Kirk, comes as a mixed bag. Despite adding some newfound perks to Baby's production, the album's rehashed lyrics and flows give Kirk an air of stagnation. DaBaby's best material has typically been scored by bouncy, electronic-led loops. "Taking It Out" would have lacked oomph without its breakneck-paced production, while the piano-like warbles of "Gorilla Glu" lent it a menacing swagger. Though we see this mimicked to varying degrees of success in Kirk's "Vibez" and "Raw Shit," there's some refreshing variation, too. Along with expressive pianos on "Gospel" and a club-inspired bounce on "Really," eighth track "Toes" treats us to some Wild West-inspired trap. While production is certainly one of the project's stronger points, missteps are equally frequent. The bass on "Off the Rip" is painfully bland, and the strings of "Prolly Heard" have been far better employed on tracks like Gunna's "Who You Foolin" and Higher Brothers' "Wudidong." Of course, a DaBaby release comes with a certain set of lyrical staples: charismatic boasts come with reassuring regularity, and there are enough "jit"s and "ain't no cap in my rap"s to bring the record back home. Given the right production, Baby's charisma can carry them forward, with "Toes" and "There He Go" landing firmly in the upper ranks of his catalog. Yet we often see Baby struggle to sustain Kirk's longer tracks; recycled flows and repetitive lyrics drain the life from "Bop" and "Raw Shit" in particular. Despite Kirk's reliance on repetition, there is one utterly unique track here: "Intro." Discarding Baby's blanket braggadocio and style, the song is his most personal work to date. Amid descriptions of his mother's battle with cancer and his own internalized misery, he reflects on the death of his father with the cutting "How the f*ck I make it to the top, same day I lost the n*gga that had me?" But one stellar track does not a stellar album make. Despite the singular brilliance of "Intro" (and some standout bangers in "Toes," "There He Go," and "XXL"), most of the project falls into mediocrity. While newer production tricks add some kick to DaBaby's formula, stagnant lyrics and monotonous flows present him as an artist unwilling to change; swamped by slushy imitations of his best work, the gems on Kirk aren't given the platform to shine. © David Crone /TiVo