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Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 27. Juli 2010 | Wichita Recordings

Auszeichnungen Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 14. Mai 2012 | Wichita Recordings

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Nach dem überwältigenden Erfolg von Crazy for You, ihrem Debüt von 2010, ist Bethany Cosentino beziehungsweise Best Coast jetzt bereit, sich mit dem zweiten Album The Only Place mit weiteren melodischen Strandpunk-Songs zurückzumelden. Das schon vorab veröffentlichte Titelstück, das auch die erste Single darstellt, ist eine klirrende Ode an Kalifornien als ein Ort, wo es "the ocean, the babes, the sun, the waves" (den Ozean, die Frauen, die Sonne, die Wellen) gibt, und es wird die Frage gestellt: "Why would you live anywhere else?" – "Warum würde man irgendwo anders leben wollen?" Wenn der Fuzz-Bass und der leicht Neunziger-angehauchte Alternative-Rock-Unterbau stellvertretend für den Rest des Albums sind, wird The Only Place ein eingängiges Paket voller Hooks. Das Album soll zur selben Zeit erscheinen wie Cosentinos erste Modekollektion, die exklusiv von Urban Outfitters vertrieben wird und so typisch sonnig und fröhlich ist wie ihr Sound. © TiVo
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Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 21. Februar 2020 | Concord Records

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Best Coast's 2015 album California Nights was a huge sounding '90s-influenced statement that positioned the group on the verge of stadium stardom. After a five-year period of rethinking their music and personal lives, the duo return with a record that takes a less bombastic approach. Always Tomorrow is a more musically diverse record that flows from Weezer-y punk-pop ("Everything Has Changed") to smoothed-out HAIM-style pop ("For the First Time") with stops at girl group melancholy ("True") and bopping new wave ("Seeing Red") along the way. Producers Carlos de la Garza and Justin Meldal-Johnsen work with the band to sand off any remaining rough edges, which is no shock after how slick California Nights felt. At the same time, they scale back the scope of the songs overall to make it feel like a step back from bouncing around hockey arenas and instead filling a big club. It's a less ambitious, slightly more intimate approach that fits more with the very personal lyrics that detail Bethany Cosentino's recovery and self-care process. She quit a few vices in the years between recordings and shifted around some priorities too; she's not shy about detailing the fine points of the changes she's been through. At length. Over and over and over again. In fact, every song covers the same ground of confession and contrition with a fine-toothed comb. So much so that about halfway through the record, it gets to be too much. No amount of hooky guitar breaks from Bobb Bruno or fist-pumping choruses or cheerfully familiar chord progressions are enough to distract from the numbing sameness of the lyrical content. The only way it might have worked is if the music was thrilling in some way -- it isn't -- or if Cosentino ever dropped the slacker drawl vocal style she uses to deliver each self-obsessed observation. There are a few spots where she actually breaks through and does some singing that sounds like there's real emotion driving it, like on "Make It Last." More often than not, she buries her more expressive voice in the background, which helps contribute to the weird muted feeling much of the album has. It's not all bad; some songs like the moody "Used to Be," which feels like a continuation of California Nights' sound, or "Rollercoaster," which sports a fun baggy groove, point in a positive direction. Mostly, though, the album is a little too close to boring to make it worth more than half a spin. Maybe broken into a series of singles or a couple of EPs it would have been more palatable, but in this form it's just too samey and underwhelming to make much of an impression. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 4. Mai 2015 | Harvest Records

Sometimes a band needs to go big or go home. On California Nights, Best Coast go bigger than big and it proves to be exactly the right move. On their previous album, 2013's The Only Place, they made a baby step toward becoming a stadium indie band, but it ended up being more of a misstep. Working with Jon Brion, the duo of Bethany Cosentino and Bobb Bruno cut down on the guitar noise, added some sophistication, and ended up with a tepid album. This time with the help of producer Wally Gagel, they aim for the back row of arenas with a huge sound made up of layers of echoing guitars, drums that boom like cannons, and Cosentino's vocals way out front like they should be. An easy reference point is Hole's Celebrity Skin, when Courtney Love stopped worrying about being real and made a brilliant pop album instead. California Nights is the sound of a band embracing its destiny as a mainstream indie rock band, not a grungy punk duo. It may have worked for them in the past, but becoming a slick, sleek hook-dispensing machine was the only way for them to move ahead. It's true that fans of their early records might find this new approach to be a little too smooth, a little too well-produced, but they aren't trying to make those people happy anymore. They are aiming for fans of bands like Metric and Weezer (or to go back further, Smashing Pumpkins), who play(ed) for the masses, not for bloggers or vinyl fetishists. Most of the album hits a midtempo sweet spot, with the shiny guitars and powerful drums locking together in perfect harmony and Cosentino's more-powerful-than-before vocals sounding great on top. In this new context, her resignedly melancholic, sometimes morose lyrics fit much better; she seems to have smoothed out the rough spots that pretty much ruined The Only Place. This template works really well, but when they deviate from the basics the album really goes in some interesting directions. The title track is anthemic and epic, with Cosentino's soaring vocals and the atmospheric musical backing providing exactly the panoramic setting the song requires. The short and sweet "Fading Fast" is the poppiest song on the record, with handclaps and a super-hooky guitar riff. If it doesn't show up on a commercial at some point, it'll be a shock. The girl group-inspired "Wasted Time," which ends the album on a hazy, bummed-out note, shows that the band can indeed write convincing ballads. They only needed the right sound to make it work. That's the story with the whole album, since Best Coast had seemed to be floundering around trying to figure out their next step. On California Nights, they made a risky choice and it pays off in a big way. They come off assured and confident, fully in control of the songs and the sound in a way they never have before. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 11. September 2020 | Concord Records

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Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 24. Februar 2015 | Harvest Records

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Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 14. Mai 2012 | Wichita Recordings

Nach dem überwältigenden Erfolg von Crazy for You, ihrem Debüt von 2010, ist Bethany Cosentino beziehungsweise Best Coast jetzt bereit, sich mit dem zweiten Album The Only Place mit weiteren melodischen Strandpunk-Songs zurückzumelden. Das schon vorab veröffentlichte Titelstück, das auch die erste Single darstellt, ist eine klirrende Ode an Kalifornien als ein Ort, wo es "the ocean, the babes, the sun, the waves" (den Ozean, die Frauen, die Sonne, die Wellen) gibt, und es wird die Frage gestellt: "Why would you live anywhere else?" – "Warum würde man irgendwo anders leben wollen?" Wenn der Fuzz-Bass und der leicht Neunziger-angehauchte Alternative-Rock-Unterbau stellvertretend für den Rest des Albums sind, wird The Only Place ein eingängiges Paket voller Hooks. Das Album soll zur selben Zeit erscheinen wie Cosentinos erste Modekollektion, die exklusiv von Urban Outfitters vertrieben wird und so typisch sonnig und fröhlich ist wie ihr Sound. © TiVo
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Lounge - Erschienen am 13. Dezember 2019 | Concord Records

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Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 22. Oktober 2013 | Jewel City

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CD1,99 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 25. Juni 2021 | Concord Records

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Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 5. November 2019 | Concord Records

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Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 2. Februar 2010 | Group Tightener

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CD14,99 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 21. Februar 2020 | Concord Records

Best Coast's 2015 album California Nights was a huge sounding '90s-influenced statement that positioned the group on the verge of stadium stardom. After a five-year period of rethinking their music and personal lives, the duo return with a record that takes a less bombastic approach. Always Tomorrow is a more musically diverse record that flows from Weezer-y punk-pop ("Everything Has Changed") to smoothed-out HAIM-style pop ("For the First Time") with stops at girl group melancholy ("True") and bopping new wave ("Seeing Red") along the way. Producers Carlos de la Garza and Justin Meldal-Johnsen work with the band to sand off any remaining rough edges, which is no shock after how slick California Nights felt. At the same time, they scale back the scope of the songs overall to make it feel like a step back from bouncing around hockey arenas and instead filling a big club. It's a less ambitious, slightly more intimate approach that fits more with the very personal lyrics that detail Bethany Cosentino's recovery and self-care process. She quit a few vices in the years between recordings and shifted around some priorities too; she's not shy about detailing the fine points of the changes she's been through. At length. Over and over and over again. In fact, every song covers the same ground of confession and contrition with a fine-toothed comb. So much so that about halfway through the record, it gets to be too much. No amount of hooky guitar breaks from Bobb Bruno or fist-pumping choruses or cheerfully familiar chord progressions are enough to distract from the numbing sameness of the lyrical content. The only way it might have worked is if the music was thrilling in some way -- it isn't -- or if Cosentino ever dropped the slacker drawl vocal style she uses to deliver each self-obsessed observation. There are a few spots where she actually breaks through and does some singing that sounds like there's real emotion driving it, like on "Make It Last." More often than not, she buries her more expressive voice in the background, which helps contribute to the weird muted feeling much of the album has. It's not all bad; some songs like the moody "Used to Be," which feels like a continuation of California Nights' sound, or "Rollercoaster," which sports a fun baggy groove, point in a positive direction. Mostly, though, the album is a little too close to boring to make it worth more than half a spin. Maybe broken into a series of singles or a couple of EPs it would have been more palatable, but in this form it's just too samey and underwhelming to make much of an impression. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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CD1,99 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 5. Februar 2020 | Concord Records

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CD1,99 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 14. April 2015 | Harvest Records

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CD1,19 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 9. Februar 2010 | Post Present Medium

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Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 5. November 2019 | Concord Records

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CD10,99 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 14. Mai 2012 | Wichita Recordings

Nach dem überwältigenden Erfolg von Crazy for You, ihrem Debüt von 2010, ist Bethany Cosentino beziehungsweise Best Coast jetzt bereit, sich mit dem zweiten Album The Only Place mit weiteren melodischen Strandpunk-Songs zurückzumelden. Das schon vorab veröffentlichte Titelstück, das auch die erste Single darstellt, ist eine klirrende Ode an Kalifornien als ein Ort, wo es "the ocean, the babes, the sun, the waves" (den Ozean, die Frauen, die Sonne, die Wellen) gibt, und es wird die Frage gestellt: "Why would you live anywhere else?" – "Warum würde man irgendwo anders leben wollen?" Wenn der Fuzz-Bass und der leicht Neunziger-angehauchte Alternative-Rock-Unterbau stellvertretend für den Rest des Albums sind, wird The Only Place ein eingängiges Paket voller Hooks. Das Album soll zur selben Zeit erscheinen wie Cosentinos erste Modekollektion, die exklusiv von Urban Outfitters vertrieben wird und so typisch sonnig und fröhlich ist wie ihr Sound. © TiVo
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CD1,99 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 10. März 2015 | Harvest Records

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CD1,99 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 17. Januar 2020 | Concord Records