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Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 30. März 2015 | 429 Records

Auszeichnungen Grammy Awards
Sings finds the great Beninese vocalist Angélique Kidjo fronting the Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg, conducted by Gast Waltzing. This is a studio offering that reflects the highlights of a series of now legendary 2011 concerts between them. Recorded at the Philharmonie Luxembourg, in New York, and in France, the program is a lively and unusual retrospective from Kidjo's career. Along with the orchestra, Kidjo is joined by her own band and guest musicians including guitarist Lionel Loueke, bassist Christian McBride, and backing vocalists. Arranged by Waltzing and guitarist David Laborier, the material comprises thorough revisionings of songs central to Kidjo's catalog, including dramatic presentations of "Malaika," "Loloye," "Kelele," the traditional "Otishe," "Nanae," and her gorgeous "Naima" (not to be confused with John Coltrane's tune of the same title). While the music is certainly far "busier" and more florid than the work on her earlier records, this presentation is thoroughly lovely and her big contralto gets right on top of the orchestra, while the rhythms sound as organic as ever. Two interesting covers on the set include a deeply soulful reading of Carlos Santana's "Samba Pa Ti," with a great flügelhorn solo by Waltzing, and Sidney Bechet and Ferdinand Bonifay's "Petite Fleur" arranged in a manner that pays homage to Kidjo's idol, Édith Piaf. Perhaps the greatest asset of this particular recording is how it reaffirms what we already knew: that Kidjo can deliver any song in any setting and remain iconic. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Afrika - Erschienen am 18. Juni 2021 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

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Seit 30 Jahren genießt Angélique Kidjo nun dank ihrer Musik weltweite Anerkennung und ihre blitzartigen Erfolge sowie ihr vielseitiges Engagement haben gezeigt, dass sie Berge versetzen - wenn nicht sogar zum Tanzen bringen - kann. Nichts kann sie aufhalten, eine Pandemie schon gar nicht. Das Album entstand in diesen langen Lockdownmonaten, als die Welt plötzlich stillzustehen schien. Doch das ist hier nicht herauszuhören. Mother Nature immunisiert gegen Trübsinn und ist damit das genaue Gegenteil einer aus Not heraus entstanden Platte voller persönlicher, unruhiger Belange. Gleich mit den ersten, ohne Begleitung gesungenen Worten in Choose Love, lässt Angélique Kidjo die ungebändigte Energie ihrer Stimme explodieren. Und sie ist ansteckend. Das Album Mother Nature ist eine große Feier voller Optimismus mit einer langen VIP-Gästeliste des Afropop, Burna Boy inklusive, Sampa the Great, EarthGang, Yemi Alade, M, Salif Keita, und auch der Gitarrist Lionel Loueke gehört dazu. Mit einer für die aktuelle Elektromusik erfindungsreichen Produktion, bei der Leader-Vocals und Chorgesang einen vorrangigen Platz einnehmen, erweist Angélique Kidjo der Geschichte der sich ununterbrochen wandelnden afrikanischen Musik die Ehre. Das von ihr neu interpretierte Indépendance Cha Cha, diese altbekannte, aus feierlich-politischem Anlass gespielte Hymne des Kongolesen Le Grand Kallé, könnte leicht zum größten Hit dieses Sommers werden, einer, der motiviert hinauszugehen, zu schreien, zu tanzen, egal, ob es regnet oder ob die Sonne scheint, egal, was die Nachbarn dazu sagen. Wie schon der Titel sagt, geht es auf diesem Album um die Natur. Angélique Kidjo ist zweifellos so etwas wie eine Naturgewalt. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
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Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 19. April 2019 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Hi-Res Booklet
Since she began releasing solo recordings in 1981, Beninese singer Angelique Kidjo has illustrated the reliance of Western popular musics on African traditions for inspiration. In 2018, the vocalist enlisted an all-star cast that included Nigerian drum master Tony Allen and some American indie rockers to display the coat of many colors that lies in the grooves of the Talking Heads' Remain in Light by revisioning the entire album through that lens. Kidjo is at it again with Celia, her album-length tribute to the queen of salsa, Cuban singer Celia Cruz. This time the connection is seamless. Kidjo began listening to Cruz's music in 1974, after seeing her perform in Benin as part of an African tour. Cruz readily acknowledged the African influence in her music and has sought to draw attention to it throughout her career -- especially after her exile from Cuba in 1959 -- by singing Yoruban songs exported during the slave trade some 400 years previously. Kidjo's affinity for the salsa pioneer grew deeper after being exiled herself from Benin when a Marxist/Leninist government took power during the '80s. On Celia, Kidjo delivers ten tracks Cruz recorded and performed at various points in her career (but focuses mainly on the '50s when she fronted La Sonora Matancera), revisioned through a rainbow palette of African sounds without sacrificing their Latin grooves. Allen returns on drums, while Meshell Ndegeocello appears on bass alongside saxophonist and renaissance man Shabaka Hutchings and his Sons of Kemet tuba boss Theon Cross (the entire quartet performs on "Bemba Colora"), Kidjo's longtime guitarist Dominic James, the Gangbé Brass Band from Benin, Togo guitarist Amen Viana, and others. Recorded in New York and Paris, the set commences with "Cucala." While its ringing guitars are drenched in Nigerian high life, the horn chart is drawn from South African jive while Allen lays down meaty, propulsive Afrobeat rhythms. On "La Vida Es un Carnaval," a late hit for Cruz, Kidjo and the band weave through Ethiopian jazz and Senegalese funk. The singer employs cello, bass, marimba, percussion, piano, and organ on a reading of Tito Puente's "Sahara" that transitions from Berber-esque desert drones to Afro-Cuban son and rhumba. "Elegua" and closer "Yemaya" are both rooted in the Santeria chants Kidjo loved as a child. They are included as reflections of Cruz's deep commitment to African traditional music. Kidjo's chart peels away the horn-driven guaracha feel of Cruz’s recordings with La Sonora Matancera to reveal their profound spirituality. The classic "Quimbara" transforms its standard-time guaguancó rhythms through Allen's 6/8 Afrobeat charge above a small army of percussion instruments and snaky guitar lines from Viana, who beautifully evokes a griot's kora. "Bemba Colora" is a proto salsa tune originally delivered by Cruz on 1966's Son con Guaguanco. It's offered somewhat straight here, though its textures and dynamics are more frenetic thanks to Sons of Kemet, Viana's guitar, and Vane's Farfisa. Kidjo succeeds on Celia because she not only pays revelatory tribute to a prime influence, but channels that very spirit of inspiration to deliver a high-water mark in her catalog. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 20. Februar 2012 | Razor & Tie

Booklet
A CD and DVD representation of an uplifting live special Angélique Kidjo taped at WGBH Studios, Spirit Rising features guest spots from Branford Marsalis, Josh Groban, Ezra Koenig, Diane Reeves, dancers from the Broadway show FELA!, the Borromeo String Quartet, the Kuumba Choir, and a horn section courtesy of Berklee College. © TiVo
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Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 1. Mai 2007 | Razor & Tie

Mit Kollaborationen-Alben ist es so eine Sache. Das weiß auch Angelique Kidjo, und so klingt es schon fast nach Rechtfertigung, wenn sie erklärt: "Mir sind die Vorurteile hinsichtlich dieser ewigen Featuring-Songs absolut nicht fremd. Ich schmücke mich allerdings auf dem Album nicht mit zufälligen Bekanntschaften, die mich aufwerten sollen. Vielmehr steuern ausschließlich Freunde von mir ihre charakteristischen Stile bei". Wer solche Freunde hat, kann von Glück reden, denn "Djin Djin" wartet mit einer dicken Latte hochprominenter Stars auf. "Mir war es wichtig, dass jeder dieser großartigen Musiker mit mir kommt, zu meinen musikalischen Wurzeln", definiert Kidjo die Zielsetzung: "Djin Djin" ist eine Hommage an ihr Heimatland Benin. Auf dem rhythmischen Fundament der reichhaltigen westafrikanischen Musiktradition toben sich so unterschiedliche Giganten wie Alicia Keys ("Djin Djin"), Peter Gabriel ("Salala"), Ziggy Marley ("Sedjedo"), Amadou & Mariam ("Senamou"), Carlos Santana ("Pearls"), Joss Stone ("Gimme Shelter") und Branford Marsalis ("Djin Djin") aus. Exklusiv für die europäische Version legen sich für "Ae Ae" Joy Denalane und Carmen Consoli ins Zeug. Die Youssou N'Dour-Version desselben Songs "gibt es demnächst bei iTunes zum Download", ergänzt Kidjo. Die Frontfrauen und -männer können sich dabei auf ein filigranes, abwechslungsreiches und stabiles Fundament von Schlagzeuger Poogie Bell (Erykah Badu, Chaka Khan), Keyboarder Amp Fiddler (Prince, George Clinton), Multiinstrumentalist Larry Campbell (Bob Dylan, Paul Simon) und Bassist Habib Faye (Youssou N'Dour) verlassen. Für den beninischen Puls sind die Perkussionisten Crespin Kpitiki und Benoit Avihoue zuständig, die Kidjo von der heimatlichen Gangbé Brass Band ausleiht. Bei solch prominenter Besetzung lässt sich Angelique Kidjo natürlich auch produktionstechnisch nicht lumpen und holt den erfahrenen Tony Visconti ins Boot, dessen Händchen schon für David Bowie, T.Rex, Osibisa, Les Rita Mitsouko und Morrissey über die Regler huschten. "Als wir fertig waren, waren alle etwas traurig, denn während der zwei gemeinsamen Wochen hatten wir uns wie eine große Familie gefühlt", ruft sich Kidjo die Studiozeit gerne ins Gedächtnis zurück. Inhaltlich zeigt sich Kidjo vielseitig und tiefgründig, und so erinnern ihre Lieder an das Wunder der Geburt ("Salala"), an die Einzigartigkeit jedes Individuums ("Arouna"), die verführerische Seite von Macht und Gewalt ("Mama Golo Papa"), das Potential von Musik, zu heilen und zu belehren ("Sedjedo"), die Vereinsamung in der modernen Gesellschaft ("Emma"), starke Frauen ("Pearls"), oder daran, jeden flüchtigen Moment des Lebens möglichst auszukosten ("Djin Djin"). Sprachlich zieht Angelique Kidjo dabei alle Register. Neben Englisch, Französisch und Portugiesisch spricht sie vier Stammessprachen ihrer afrikanischen Heimat Benin. Das reicht, um ein Album abwechslungsreich zu besingen. Zwischen die das Repertoire bestimmenden Eigenkompositionen mischt sie aufregende Cover-Versionen. Den Rolling Stones-Klassiker "Gimme Shelter" verwandelt sie, gemeinsam mit Joss Stone und den Bläsern des New Yorker Afrobeat-Kollektivs Antibalas, in eine kraftvolle Warnung ("Man muss sich nur mal umschauen. In unseren Straßen brennt es. Terroristen, die behaupten, im Namen Gottes zu agieren, zerstören alles, wofür wir gearbeitet haben"). Auf dieser Grundlage mutiert "Gimme Shelter" im selben Atemzug zu einem rauschenden (Mani-)Fest. "Es war eine der intensivsten Sessions des Albums. Für mich besitzt er ein Maximum an emotionaler Intensität, was man dem Song hoffentlich auch anhört." Tut man! "Gimme Shelter" gehört zusammen mit "Djin Djin", "Ae Ae", "Senamou", "Papa", "Awan N'La" und "Mama Golo Papa" zu den absoluten Highlights des Albums. Auf der Adaption von Ravels "Bolero" macht sie sich auf die Suche nach den gemeinsamen Wurzeln klassischer europäischer und nordafrikanischer Musik. 'Nicht suchen - finden!', lautet dabei ihre Devise, denn dem allseits bekannten Bolero trotzt sie ungeahnte Schattierungen ab, die den Gassenhauer in einem bisher unbeachteten Licht erscheinen lassen. Sades "Pearls" erscheint mit Josh Groban, dem klassisch ausgebildeten Bariton, als smoothe Klassik goes World goes Schlager-Pop-Variante, die trotz Santanas gefühlvollem Gitarrenspiel leider etwas zu schmalzig auf den Teppich trieft. Das als Ausrutscher zu bezeichnen ist jedoch übertrieben, denn im Gesamtzusammenhang betrachtet, ist "Pearls" lediglich eine der schwächeren Nummern. Ihren Charme bezieht "Djin Djin" aus dem exzellenten Gesamteindruck. Ein Worldmusic-Album das von vorne bis hinten Spaß macht, flattert einem ja nicht alle Tage auf den Tisch. Darüber hinaus scheint "Djin Djin" mit einer dicken Schicht Pattex ausgeliefert zu werden, denn der Silberling weigert sich standhaft, den CD-Player zu verlassen. © Laut
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Aye

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1994 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 30. März 2015 | 429 Records

Hi-Res Booklet
Sings finds the great Beninese vocalist Angélique Kidjo fronting the Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg, conducted by Gast Waltzing. This is a studio offering that reflects the highlights of a series of now legendary 2011 concerts between them. Recorded at the Philharmonie Luxembourg, in New York, and in France, the program is a lively and unusual retrospective from Kidjo's career. Along with the orchestra, Kidjo is joined by her own band and guest musicians including guitarist Lionel Loueke, bassist Christian McBride, and backing vocalists. Arranged by Waltzing and guitarist David Laborier, the material comprises thorough revisionings of songs central to Kidjo's catalog, including dramatic presentations of "Malaika," "Loloye," "Kelele," the traditional "Otishe," "Nanae," and her gorgeous "Naima" (not to be confused with John Coltrane's tune of the same title). While the music is certainly far "busier" and more florid than the work on her earlier records, this presentation is thoroughly lovely and her big contralto gets right on top of the orchestra, while the rhythms sound as organic as ever. Two interesting covers on the set include a deeply soulful reading of Carlos Santana's "Samba Pa Ti," with a great flügelhorn solo by Waltzing, and Sidney Bechet and Ferdinand Bonifay's "Petite Fleur" arranged in a manner that pays homage to Kidjo's idol, Édith Piaf. Perhaps the greatest asset of this particular recording is how it reaffirms what we already knew: that Kidjo can deliver any song in any setting and remain iconic. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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CD9,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1991 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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CD14,99 €

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 6. April 2010 | Razor & Tie

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CD14,99 €
EVE

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 7. April 2014 | Savoy

Eve is Beninese singer/songwriter Angélique Kidjo's first recording in nearly four years. Its title is inspired literally by her mother Yvonne's nickname, and metaphorically for the Judeo-Christian heritage's first woman. It is "dedicated to the women of Africa: to their resilience and their beauty." Produced by Patrick Dillett, the album was recorded in the U.S., France, Luxembourg, and Africa. The cast of musicians is stellar: Lionel Loueke and Dominic James on guitars, Steve Jordan on drums, Christian McBride on bass, and Jean Hébrail on programming and arrangements, plus a slew of percussionists and keyboardists and a horn section. Guests include Rostam Batmagli (Vampire Weekend), Dr. John, Bernie Worrell, Nigerian singer ASA, the Kronos Quartet, Steven Bernstein, Stuart Bogie, and, on the sweeping, nearly transcendent "Awalole," the Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg. This is no ordinary "world fusion" exercise. This is a modern pop record whose roots and rhythms are deep in African, Caribbean, and Latin traditions. After recording these tracks, Kidjo went to Africa with a six-track tape recorder and captured eight Beninese women's choirs in a variety of languages, Cotonou's fabulous Trio Teriba, and the Merti Samburu choir from Kenya, who are featured on "M'baamba (Kenyan Song)," a traditional song given a cooking, punchy modern arrangement full of whomping, entwined low-end basses, intricate guitar lines, and soaring organ. "Shango Wa" is boiling Afro-funk with swirling organ, hyperkinetic basslines, waves of rolling drums, nasty wah-wah guitar, and a women's choir soaring to meet Kidjo's propulsive vocal. The ballad "Blewu" is a stripped-down guitar-and-voice duet with countryman Loueke. "Bomba" -- one of two tracks featuring Batmagli on guitar -- is an ebullient call-and-response number where sky-scorching B-3, careening funky bass, and lyrical guitars surround the choir and Kidjo, who adds a soul tinge to her delivery, creating an irresistible contrast. "Kulumbu" is a folk song that jumps with Dr. John's pumping NOLA R&B piano. "Ebile," with Kronos, is one of the more unusual arrangements here, but because of its timbre, melody, vocal style, and raw polyrhythmic layers, feels nearly traditional. Another stunner is "Bana," where Kidjo sings with her mother and a choir as highlife, Beninese folk and pop, and Caribbean rhythms all come together infectiously. The driving Afro-Cuban funk in "Orisha," with its dirty keyboard bass and popping horns, is low-down and celebratory. Dillett's production is brilliant. He seamlessly weaves together the polished, pristine sounds of modern pop with organic sounds and textures, and captures the boundless energy of it all as if it were live. There are several milestones in Kidjo's nearly 30-year recording career; Eve is certainly one of them. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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CD14,99 €

R&B - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1998 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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CD14,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1996 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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CD14,99 €

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 30. März 2015 | Savoy

Sings finds the great Beninese vocalist Angélique Kidjo fronting the Orchestre Philharmonique du Luxembourg, conducted by Gast Waltzing. This is a studio offering that reflects the highlights of a series of now legendary 2011 concerts between them. Recorded at the Philharmonie Luxembourg, in New York, and in France, the program is a lively and unusual retrospective from Kidjo's career. Along with the orchestra, Kidjo is joined by her own band and guest musicians including guitarist Lionel Loueke, bassist Christian McBride, and backing vocalists. Arranged by Waltzing and guitarist David Laborier, the material comprises thorough revisionings of songs central to Kidjo's catalog, including dramatic presentations of "Malaika," "Loloye," "Kelele," the traditional "Otishe," "Nanae," and her gorgeous "Naima" (not to be confused with John Coltrane's tune of the same title). While the music is certainly far "busier" and more florid than the work on her earlier records, this presentation is thoroughly lovely and her big contralto gets right on top of the orchestra, while the rhythms sound as organic as ever. Two interesting covers on the set include a deeply soulful reading of Carlos Santana's "Samba Pa Ti," with a great flügelhorn solo by Waltzing, and Sidney Bechet and Ferdinand Bonifay's "Petite Fleur" arranged in a manner that pays homage to Kidjo's idol, Édith Piaf. Perhaps the greatest asset of this particular recording is how it reaffirms what we already knew: that Kidjo can deliver any song in any setting and remain iconic. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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CD14,99 €

Afrika - Erschienen am 18. Juni 2021 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Seit 30 Jahren genießt Angélique Kidjo nun dank ihrer Musik weltweite Anerkennung und ihre blitzartigen Erfolge sowie ihr vielseitiges Engagement haben gezeigt, dass sie Berge versetzen - wenn nicht sogar zum Tanzen bringen - kann. Nichts kann sie aufhalten, eine Pandemie schon gar nicht. Das Album entstand in diesen langen Lockdownmonaten, als die Welt plötzlich stillzustehen schien. Doch das ist hier nicht herauszuhören. Mother Nature immunisiert gegen Trübsinn und ist damit das genaue Gegenteil einer aus Not heraus entstanden Platte voller persönlicher, unruhiger Belange. Gleich mit den ersten, ohne Begleitung gesungenen Worten in Choose Love, lässt Angélique Kidjo die ungebändigte Energie ihrer Stimme explodieren. Und sie ist ansteckend. Das Album Mother Nature ist eine große Feier voller Optimismus mit einer langen VIP-Gästeliste des Afropop, Burna Boy inklusive, Sampa the Great, EarthGang, Yemi Alade, M, Salif Keita, und auch der Gitarrist Lionel Loueke gehört dazu. Mit einer für die aktuelle Elektromusik erfindungsreichen Produktion, bei der Leader-Vocals und Chorgesang einen vorrangigen Platz einnehmen, erweist Angélique Kidjo der Geschichte der sich ununterbrochen wandelnden afrikanischen Musik die Ehre. Das von ihr neu interpretierte Indépendance Cha Cha, diese altbekannte, aus feierlich-politischem Anlass gespielte Hymne des Kongolesen Le Grand Kallé, könnte leicht zum größten Hit dieses Sommers werden, einer, der motiviert hinauszugehen, zu schreien, zu tanzen, egal, ob es regnet oder ob die Sonne scheint, egal, was die Nachbarn dazu sagen. Wie schon der Titel sagt, geht es auf diesem Album um die Natur. Angélique Kidjo ist zweifellos so etwas wie eine Naturgewalt. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
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CD14,49 €

Pop/Rock - Erschienen am 3. Mai 2004 | Saint George

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CD14,49 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 4. Mai 2004 | Columbia

This time around Angélique Kidjo has definitely delivered the goods, exploring the African Diaspora westwards, and the effect it's had on Latin music (and vice versa, as the trips and influences weren't always one-way). So, in the opener "Seyin Djro," for example, one can hear a Latin bounciness, but also percussion and singing from Africa, while "Cogoleo" investigates the many Atlantic crossing on Congolese rumba, and even adds West African balofon for good measure, giving an intriguing mix of West and Central African music. The whole album is a good time, but also extremely thoughtful, such as on "Congo Habanera," which slithers sexily and loudly, or "Adje Dada," where the kora harp ripples in and out of a Latin groove whose roots are in Africa. "Bissimilai" heads further south, taking on the colors of Brazil -- but that's only right, since it had one of the highest slave populations of anywhere in the Americas. Perhaps the odd piece out is the ballad "Le Monde Comme un Bébé," with its strings, a duet with Henri Salvador that seems to stand outside Kidjo's concept. Far too many times in the past, albums from the Benin diva have fallen short. But this deserves plenty of praise. The connections between Africa and the blues and Africa and Cuba (as Kidjo does herself on one track here, with the tres and African guitar soloing off each other to great effect) have been dug into often. Yes, others have pointed out and illustrated the bonds between Latin and African music, but Kidjo remains high-profile enough that plenty of people might actually listen this time. © Chris Nickson /TiVo
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HI-RES2,99 €
CD1,99 €

Afrika - Erschienen am 26. März 2021 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Hi-Res
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CD14,99 €
OYO

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 6. April 2010 | Razor & Tie

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CD14,99 €

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 19. April 2019 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Booklet
Since she began releasing solo recordings in 1981, Beninese singer Angelique Kidjo has illustrated the reliance of Western popular musics on African traditions for inspiration. In 2018, the vocalist enlisted an all-star cast that included Nigerian drum master Tony Allen and some American indie rockers to display the coat of many colors that lies in the grooves of the Talking Heads' Remain in Light by revisioning the entire album through that lens. Kidjo is at it again with Celia, her album-length tribute to the queen of salsa, Cuban singer Celia Cruz. This time the connection is seamless. Kidjo began listening to Cruz's music in 1974, after seeing her perform in Benin as part of an African tour. Cruz readily acknowledged the African influence in her music and has sought to draw attention to it throughout her career -- especially after her exile from Cuba in 1959 -- by singing Yoruban songs exported during the slave trade some 400 years previously. Kidjo's affinity for the salsa pioneer grew deeper after being exiled herself from Benin when a Marxist/Leninist government took power during the '80s. On Celia, Kidjo delivers ten tracks Cruz recorded and performed at various points in her career (but focuses mainly on the '50s when she fronted La Sonora Matancera), revisioned through a rainbow palette of African sounds without sacrificing their Latin grooves. Allen returns on drums, while Meshell Ndegeocello appears on bass alongside saxophonist and renaissance man Shabaka Hutchings and his Sons of Kemet tuba boss Theon Cross (the entire quartet performs on "Bemba Colora"), Kidjo's longtime guitarist Dominic James, the Gangbé Brass Band from Benin, Togo guitarist Amen Viana, and others. Recorded in New York and Paris, the set commences with "Cucala." While its ringing guitars are drenched in Nigerian high life, the horn chart is drawn from South African jive while Allen lays down meaty, propulsive Afrobeat rhythms. On "La Vida Es un Carnaval," a late hit for Cruz, Kidjo and the band weave through Ethiopian jazz and Senegalese funk. The singer employs cello, bass, marimba, percussion, piano, and organ on a reading of Tito Puente's "Sahara" that transitions from Berber-esque desert drones to Afro-Cuban son and rhumba. "Elegua" and closer "Yemaya" are both rooted in the Santeria chants Kidjo loved as a child. They are included as reflections of Cruz's deep commitment to African traditional music. Kidjo's chart peels away the horn-driven guaracha feel of Cruz’s recordings with La Sonora Matancera to reveal their profound spirituality. The classic "Quimbara" transforms its standard-time guaguancó rhythms through Allen's 6/8 Afrobeat charge above a small army of percussion instruments and snaky guitar lines from Viana, who beautifully evokes a griot's kora. "Bemba Colora" is a proto salsa tune originally delivered by Cruz on 1966's Son con Guaguanco. It's offered somewhat straight here, though its textures and dynamics are more frenetic thanks to Sons of Kemet, Viana's guitar, and Vane's Farfisa. Kidjo succeeds on Celia because she not only pays revelatory tribute to a prime influence, but channels that very spirit of inspiration to deliver a high-water mark in her catalog. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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CD9,99 €

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2000 | Juna