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Old songs, New Order

In perhaps their best live album to date, New Order revisit some of Joy Division's classics at the place where it all began...

By Max Dembo | Video of the Day | July 12, 2019
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In 1978, Joy Division made their first TV appearance in the former Manchester Granada studios on Tony Wilson’s show, So It Goes. In the summer of 2017, New Order (aka Joy Division Mark II) returned to the scene of the crime for 5 concerts, with ∑(No,12k,Lg,17Mif) New Order + Liam Gillick: So It Goes.. being their 13th July performance.

Despite not being particularly renowned for their on-stage performances, they still continue to regularly release live albums. After BBC Radio 1 Live in Concert in 1992, Live at the London Troxy in 2011, Live at Bestival 2012 in 2013 and NOMC15 in 2017, Bernard Sumner’s band conceived this show with artist Liam Gillick, who is normally better suited to the Tate Modern than to concert halls. Some tracks have even been reworked with the help of composer Joe Duddell and a 12-strong synthesizer ensemble.



But one thing that fans will be particularly pleased by is the set list. Songs now seldom performed by the Mancunian group (such as Times Change from Republic, Vanishing Point from Technique, Ultraviolence from Power, Corruption and Lies and Plastic from Music Complete) as well as four Joy Division tracks (In a Lonely Place, Decades, Heart & Soul and Disorder, songs which haven’t been played live in 30 years!) make for a very special record.

Without resting on their laurels, the quintet consisting of the original line-up (Bernard Sumner, Stephen Morris and Gillian Gilbert) along with later additions (Phil Cunningham and Tom Chapman) perform completely reworked versions of their hits from the last century, proving that they most certainly still have things left to say.



LISTEN TO ∑(NO,12K,LG,17MIF) NEW ORDER + LIAM GILLICK: SO IT GOES.. BY NEW ORDER ON QOBUZ


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