Similar artists

Albums

€8.49

Pop - Released June 29, 1999 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard - Stereophile: Record To Die For
Once Nat King Cole gave up playing piano on a regular basis and instead focused on a series of easy listening vocal albums, jazz fans longed for him to return to his first love. These 1956 studio sessions made up Cole's last jazz-oriented disc, where he played piano and sang on every number, joined by several guest soloists. Cole's vocals are impeccable and swinging, while his piano alternates between providing subdued backgrounds and light solos that don't reveal his true potential on the instrument. Willie Smith's smooth alto sax buoys the singer in the brisk take of "Just You, Just Me." Harry "Sweets" Edison's muted trumpet complements the leader in his interpretation of "Sweet Lorraine." Composer Juan Tizol's valve trombone and former Cole sideman Jack Costanzo's bongos add just the right touch to the brisk take of "Caravan." Stuff Smith's humorous, unusually understated violin is a nice touch in "When I Grow Too Old to Dream." It's hard for any Nat King Cole fan to ignore these important sessions. [The original version of this release featured a dozen tracks, later expanded to 17 in the '80s with the discovery of some unreleased material. Yet another track, the alternate take of "You're Looking at Me," was also found and added to reissues beginning in the late '90s.] ~ Ken Dryden
€18.49
€13.49

Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | CAPITOL

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard - Stereophile: Record To Die For
€17.99

Jazz - Released December 12, 2006 | Frémeaux & associés

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc Jazzman
€13.49

Pop - Released June 24, 2008 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
€13.49

Vocal Jazz - Released June 24, 2008 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The year after he had formally disbanded his trio to turn his attention to vocal pop music, Nat King Cole reversed himself and went into the studio with guitarist John Collins, bassist Charlie Harris, and drummer Bunny Shawker and recorded the eight-song 10" LP Penthouse Serenade, a quiet, reflective set of standards like "Somebody Loves Me" and "Laura" that he performed instrumentally at the piano. The album confirmed that, whatever success he might be having as a singer, he hadn't lost his touch. ~ William Ruhlmann
€18.49
€13.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | CAPITOL

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
€13.49

Pop - Released June 24, 2008 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
In his extended sleeve note, Nat King Cole writes of his desire as an artist to find "something else," by which he seems to mean something other than yet another album of rearranged pop standards, and he claims to have found it in the work of songwriters Ray Rasch and Dotty Wayne, who fashioned the song cycle contained on this LP. More than a concept album of similarly themed songs, it is a unified, if simple, story of the search for love (complete with connective narration) in songs fashioned for Cole that allow him to delve into swing-era jazz styles and blues (all courtesy of Nelson Riddle's orchestrations), along with more characteristic ballads. The result is what Cole calls "the biggest thrill of my recording career," which may be a stretch, although it seems to have been meant sincerely. Certainly, Cole throws himself into these songs and into his spoken parts, clichéd as they sometimes are. Rasch and Wayne seem to be attempting something like a book musical here, but as rendered in 14 tracks on a 36-minute disc, the plot remains sketchy and generic. At best, it can serve only as a suggestion of what a staged version would be like, and since all the songs seem to have been crafted to Cole himself rather than for possible characters, it's not clear how the work could be developed. That said, there are some good songs here, and Cole and Riddle have given them some enthusiastic treatments. ~ William Ruhlmann
€13.49

Vocal Jazz - Released June 24, 2008 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
The albums that Nat King Cole, Frank Sinatra, and other classic pop singers made in the 1950s usually consisted of standards from the golden era of pop songwriting in the 1920s, '30s, and '40s. For this album, Cole had the idea of putting together a set of newly written songs in the classic style, with typically sympathetic arrangements by Nelson Riddle. "Personally, I hear the magic in all these selections," Cole wrote in the liner notes. "It will be interesting to see whether I'm right." The magic listeners hear today is in Cole's voice, not in the songs, all of which are as forgotten as most of the songwriters. (There are a couple of ringers, such as Johnny Burke, Sammy Cahn, and Paul Weston, but they're not at their best.) ~ William Ruhlmann
€13.49

Vocal Jazz - Released April 1, 2004 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
In the days when recording artists did not write their own material, it was not unusual for them to record more material than actually fit into record companies' release schedules. As this album makes abundantly clear, that was the case with Nat "King" Cole. Between December 20, 1955, and January 21, 1955, Cole held a series of recording sessions with arranger/conductor Nelson Riddle. Cole was near the peak of his commercial appeal, but this was also a transitional period in the record business, with rock & roll coming in and claiming a big chunk of the pop singles charts. Though a Capitol Records press release refers to this material as "an unissued studio album," it's more likely that the recording dates were intended as singles sessions rather than constituting an album project. Two singles were extracted and released from the material, resulting in four chart placings for "Night Lights," "Too Young to Go Steady," "To the Ends of the Earth," and "Never Let Me Go." But at a time when Elvis Presley was transforming the singles charts, the rest of these songs may have been deemed old-fashioned. Several of the tracks ("Too Young to Go Steady" among them) also came from a new stage musical, Strip for Action, which closed out of town, possibly dooming the chances of the other tracks being released. Nevertheless, these recordings contain excellent performances of typically expressive Riddle charts. The wonder is that, in the 36 years since Cole's death, Capitol has only bothered to release four of these tracks beyond the four singles sides released at the time, leaving 12 unreleased Cole masters of this quality. It's true that the performances are more impressive than the actual compositions, but this album still constitutes a welcome discovery among Cole reissues. ~ William Ruhlmann
€18.49

Vocal Jazz - Released March 3, 2003 | Parlophone Catalogue

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Cobbled together from previous singles and a few unreleased tracks, Thank You, Pretty Baby does, unfortunately, sound like a posthumous Nat King Cole LP. Its palette of clippity-clop rhythms, trad vocal choruses, and breezy, evocative strings definitely wouldn't have made the grade during Cole's lifetime -- in fact, the rhythms were added after his death. Still, unlike contemporary material by Elvis Presley (who sang over nearly identical arrangements), Cole transcends the simpy arrangements and weak material simply by exercising his voice, lending an air of respectability to the better songs while treating the novelties with an air of amusement that allows both artist and listener to share the joke. Several of the songs were (originally) arranged by Nelson Riddle, including a beautiful version of "You Made Me Love You." ~ John Bush
€13.49

Pop - Released August 1, 2002 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
A year after Nat King Cole's death, Capitol Records released this "live" album, recorded at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas on January 14, 1960. There is a historical interest, in that this is the only Cole concert recording, and it's an enjoyable performance, with more up-tempo numbers than ballads and a piano solo on "Where or When" that demonstrates Cole had not lost his jazz chops. But Cole on-stage is not a revelatory experience, at least on this night, and like most Vegas performances, this one is a little overdone. (An arrangement of Cole Porter's "Miss Otis Regrets" is especially unfortunate.) [Originally released in 1960, Nat King Cole at the Sands was reissued on CD in 2002, and reissued again on CD with bonus tracks in 2003.] ~ William Ruhlmann
€15.99

Pop - Released November 11, 1996 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
In 1998, EMI released Sincerely/Beautiful, which contained two complete albums -- Sincerely (1967, originally released on Capitol) and Beautiful -- by smooth crooner Nat King Cole on one compact disc. ~ Tim Sendra
€19.49

Vocal Jazz - Released August 2, 1993 | Blue Note Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Nat King Cole recorded with arranger/bandleader Billy May on several occasions and all of their collaborations are on this excellent double-CD The Billy May Sessions. Dating from 1951, 1953, 1954, 1957 and 1961, some of the more memorable numbers include "Walkin' My Baby Back Home," "Angel Eyes," "Papa Loves Mambo," "Send for Me," "Who's Sorry Now," "The Party's Over" and "When My Sugar Walks Down the Street." Cole also takes organ solos on three of the selections from 1961 (the only time he ever recorded on that instrument), though he plays no piano on this set. It's recommended for his superior middle of the road singing. ~ Scott Yanow
€13.49

Vocal Jazz - Released March 29, 1993 | Blue Note Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
€6.99

Pop - Released January 25, 2005 | Capitol Records

Easily the longest of any Capitol single-disc compilation, 2005's The World of Nat King Cole also benefits from a fresh remastering of its material to make it the best introduction to the interpretive brilliance of Nat King Cole. Nearly all the hits that need to be here are indeed present: "Straighten Up and Fly Right," "Route 66," "Nature Boy," "Too Young," and "Mona Lisa." The compilers also wisely chose a few representative songs to replace some of the middling hits; the only surprise is the absence of "The Christmas Song" and "Lush Life," although the chart hits -- "Answer Me, My Love," "Pretend," "Looking Back," and the much-maligned "Those Lazy-Hazy-Crazy Days of Summer" -- are missing for good reasons. In their places are excellent selections like "Let There Be Love" from a 1961 George Shearing collaboration, "Thou Swell" from Cole's 1960 LP at the Sands hotel in Las Vegas, his sublime 1956 version of "Stardust," and the ghost duet on "Unforgettable" between Nat and daughter Natalie Cole that earned seven Grammy awards in 1992. The liner notes include many great photographs as well as an essay written by Natalie. ~ John Bush