Albums

165062 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest and filtered by Rock
€4.99

Rock - Released October 20, 1997 | Prophecy

€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 20, 1997 | Beggars Banquet

€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 20, 1997 | Beggars Banquet

€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 20, 1997 | Beggars Banquet

From the first notes of Buffalo Tom's second album, Birdbrain, it was clear the band had done more than their share of growing up since their self-titled debut, which had come out the year before. The title cut leaps out of the gate with a tight snap that leaves anything on the first album in the dust; drummer Tom Maginnis and bassist Chris Colbourn sound far tighter and more unified as a rhythm section, and guitarist and vocalist Bill Janovitz reveals a taut, slashing authority that was quite a change from the sloppy, sometimes meandering sound he'd summoned up his first time at bat. Just as roadwork had firmed up Buffalo Tom's sound, their songwriting was also steadily improving; the ultra-catchy "Birdbrain" sounded like it could have been a hit single in some alternate universe, while "Guy Who Is Me" and "Crawl" indicated they were learning to work better with trickier structures, and "Enemy" and "Skeleton Key" prove they could slow down effectively and communicate something other than a rant. While the band was still working the last vestiges of their clear Dinosaur Jr. influence at this point (J Mascis was in the producer's chair once again for this set), Birdbrain made it clear Buffalo Tom was far more than just Dino Jr.'s little brother band. The CD adds a nice acoustic cover of "Heaven" by the Psychedelic Furs as a bonus -- yet another touch you would never have expected judging from their debut. ~ Mark Deming
€7.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 20, 1997 | Voices Of Wonder

€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 20, 1997 | Beggars Banquet

€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 20, 1997 | Beggars Banquet

€7.99

Rock - Released October 19, 1997 | NMC

€7.99

Punk / New Wave - Released October 15, 1997 | No Idea Records

€7.99

Punk / New Wave - Released October 15, 1997 | No Idea Records

€8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 1997 | Quarterstick Records

While Pegboy has now made the same record five times (since their formation subsequent to ace guitarist John Haggerty's departure from Naked Raygun), Cha Cha Damore is (paradoxically) a big surprise. Easily their best, this new work almost treads on such hallowed ground as Raygun's 1986 classic All Rise. Enjoying a thick, magnificently mixed production from old-days pal Steve Albini, this Chicago institution has also composed tunes that blast like a best-of, with one super-charged, melodic thruster rocket after another. The tempos serve the songs perfectly rather than rushing singer Larry Damore's gut-spilled singing, and Damore himself has improved, adding convincing anguish and unguarded feeling into his big-lug voice. Ex-Raygun bassist Pierre Kezdy's steely edge is further ferocious: even his old favorite J.J. Burnel of the Stranglers would karate-kick for such a ripping, trebly sharpness. And if you can name a drummer with bigger chops and quick-firing speed than ex-Bloodsport and Effigies mauler Joe Haggerty, big John's little bro, then to quote the Yardbirds, "Mister, you're a better man than I." Of course, it's the elder Haggerty's six-string roar, 13 years vintage, that continues to define both this band (as it did Raygun, who themselves re-formed with Kezdy but sadly without Haggerty) and the older, vaunted "Chicago sound." Between that roar, the better songs, and Albini's inspired efforts, it's not writer-hack cliché to suggest that this quartet has invested a decade to achieve a decisive work. Even the cover of Cheap Trick's 1978 Heaven Tonight staple "Surrender" (which Raygun also used to do live) sounds like Pegboy wrote it, blazing a new trail in an ancient but still fertile forest. Do not dismiss Cha Cha without fair listen. A solid band has made an LP that combines 1977 punk's dense pound with '90s post-punk's modern feel, with hooks embedded in each riff, hacksaw chord change, and chorus. ~ Jack Rabid
€13.49

Rock - Released October 14, 1997 | Disques Dreyfus

€16.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 1997 | Reprise

Following the cool reception to Insomniac, Green Day retreated from the spotlight for a year to rest and spend time with their families. During that extended break, they decided to not worry about their supposedly lost street credibility and make an album according to their instincts, which meant more experimentation and less of their trademark punk-pop. Of course, speedy, catchy punk is at the core of the group's sound, so there are plenty of familiar moments on the resultant album, Nimrod, but there are also new details that make the record an invigorating, if occasionally frustrating, listen. Although punk-pop is Green Day's forte, they sound the most alive on Nimrod when they're breaking away from their formula, whether it's the shuffling "Hitchin' a Ride," the bitchy, tongue-in-cheek humor of "The Grouch," the surging surf instrumental "Last Ride In," the punchy, horn-driven drag-queen saga "King for a Day," or the acoustic, string-laced ballad "Good Riddance." It's only when the trio confines itself to three chords that it sounds tired, but Billie Joe has such a gift for hooky, instantly memorable melodies that even these moments are enjoyable, if unremarkable. Still, Nimrod suffers from being simply too much -- although it clocks in at under 50 minutes, the 18 tracks whip by at such a breakneck speed that it leaves you somewhat dazed. With a little editing, Green Day's growth would have been put in sharper relief, and Nimrod would have been the triumphant leap forward it set out to be. As it stands, it's a muddled but intermittently exciting record that is full of promise. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
€4.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 1997 | Paulinas-Comep

€11.49

Rock - Released October 13, 1997 | Parlophone UK

Genre

Rock in the magazine