Albums

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Punk / New Wave - To be released November 24, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

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Punk / New Wave - To be released November 24, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

€112.49

Rock - To be released October 27, 2017 | BMG Rights Management GmbH

€129.99

Rock - Released October 20, 2017 | Universal Music

Booklet
€55.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 26, 2017 | Parlophone UK

The copious 3-D The Catalogue brings together Kraftwerk's 3-D concerts, remastered in a pretty startling way, thanks to the 3-D high definition and the Dolby atmos surround, new cutting-edge technological standards which fit nicely with the efforts of the pioneering German group led by founder Ralf Hütter. Here is a way to enjoy their gesamtkunstwerk (total artwork) in the comfort of your own home. 3-D The Catalogue covers the group's eight albums, played live between 2012 and 2016 at MoMA in New York, the Tate Modern in London, Tokyo's Akasaka Blitz, the Sydney Opera House, Norske Opera in Oslo, the Amsterdam Paradiso, the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris and Berlin's Neue National Galerie: Autobahn (1974), Radio-Activity (1975), Trans Europe Express (1977), The Man-Machine (1978), Computer World (1981), Techno Pop (1986), The Mix (1991) and Tour De France (2003). A vast repertoire, which could hardly have been more influential, is taken by the Germans and re-worked in often very original ways (the re-working of  Trans Europe Express, for example). Even if this treasure chest is aimed first and foremost at die-hard Kraftwerk fans, it can also serve as an introduction to one of the most innovative groups of their times, without which many artists on the electro scene (and even the rap scene) would never have seen the light of day. © CM/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 26, 2017 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 10, 2017 | Nonesuch

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Stephin Merritt has never been afraid to think big, at least as far as his music is concerned, and his ad-hoc group the Magnetic Fields enjoyed their breakthrough with the wildly ambitious 1999 set 69 Love Songs, a three-disc collection featuring, yes, 69 songs about love. While that album bests 2017's 50 Song Memoir by 19 tracks, in nearly all other respects, 50 Song Memoir is a project of even greater scale and scope. Begun as Merritt was celebrating his 50th birthday, 50 Song Memoir finds him embracing pop songs as the medium for an autobiography, with each of the 50 tracks representing a different year in his life. The result is not an operatic narrative that ticks off various major events in Merritt's first half-century, but 50 Song Memoir does deliver a fascinating portrait of Merritt's life and times. Over the course of two-and-a-half hours, Merritt shares tales of his truly strange childhood, his interactions with his mother's many eccentric boyfriends, the joys and annoyances of life in New York City, his love of the city's bars and nightclubs, his dreams of being John Foxx of Ultravox, his hatred of surfing, relationships with numerous romantic partners, and the role music has played in nearly all of these episodes. As is his habit with the Magnetic Fields, Merritt handled the sizable majority of the instrumental chores on this album himself, making use of his large collection of electronic and acoustic instruments, and the results have a clanky, homespun charm that meshes nicely with the alternately buoyant and snarky tone of his frequently lovely melodies. But the real star of 50 Song Memoir is Stephin Merritt the songwriter -- these missives are full of wit, intelligence, and engaging wordplay that bring a playful touch to even the most dire subject matter (and a very human sense of gravity to the funnier numbers). And the closer, "Somebody's Fetish," is a hilarious but encouraging statement of how love eventually comes to us all, showing even Merritt knows the value of a happy ending. There are very few working songwriters who could have pulled off this sort of a project this well, and even fewer who could make this giant-sized song cycle feel so intimate and accessible. 50 Song Memoir is a rare example of Stephin Merritt offering a look into his offstage life, but just as importantly it's a reminder of why he's a truly great songwriter, and this ranks with his finest work. ~ Mark Deming
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Rock - Released January 27, 2017 | Rhino Atlantic

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 7, 2016 | Reprise

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Rock - Released October 7, 2016 | RCA - Legacy

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In 1972, Lou Reed was a minor cult hero to a handful of rock critics and left-of-center music fans who championed his former band, the Velvet Underground, but he was unknown to the mainstream music audience. By 1986, Reed was a rock & roll icon, widely hailed as a master songwriter and one of the founding fathers of punk, glam, noise rock, and any number of other vital rock subgenres; he even scored a few hits along the way. If you want to know what happened during those 14 years to make such a difference, the answer can be found in The RCA & Arista Album Collection, a 17-disc box set that brings together nearly all of Reed's recorded work from this period. This set includes seven albums Reed cut for RCA Records from 1972 to 1975 (Lou Reed, Transformer, Berlin, Rock n' Roll Animal, Sally Can't Dance, Metal Machine Music, and Coney Island Baby), five he recorded while signed to Arista from 1976 to 1980 (Rock and Roll Heart, Street Hassle, Live: Take No Prisoners, The Bells, Growing Up in Public), and four more Reed made after re-signing to RCA in 1982 (The Blue Mask, Legendary Hearts, New Sensations, Mistrial). Despite the bulk of this set, it isn't quite complete; two live albums are missing, 1975's Lou Reed Live (outtakes from the shows recorded for Rock n' Roll Animal that were released without Reed's input) and 1984's Live in Italy (a flawed but enjoyable concert recording with guitarist Robert Quine anchoring one of Reed's best live bands). But this set beautifully charts the formative years of Reed's solo career. The early RCA albums see him finding his feet, slipping into self-indulgence and decadence before making his way back to his strong suits. The Arista albums herald Reed's return to strong, personal songwriting, even as he struggles with his demons and his ego. And a newly sober Lou returned to RCA to make some of his strongest and bravest music since leaving the VU (even if Mistrial ended that run on a stumble). Reed supervised the remastering of these albums for this release, and for the most part the sound is observably cleaner and more present, especially the LPs recorded using binaural sound, which have lost some of their murk. And the packaging is lovely; each CD is housed in a reproduction of its original vinyl jacket, and the hardcover book is full of rare photos, clippings, original liner notes, and interviews, including some candid conversations between Reed and Danny Fields. The RCA & Arista Album Collection doesn't include any rare or unreleased material (and the bonus cuts that appeared on the previous CD releases of some of these albums aren't here), but for serious fans who want to reacquaint themselves with Reed's catalog of the '70s and '80s, it has rarely been presented with this degree of care, and there's plenty of brilliant music to be found here. ~ Mark Deming
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Rock - Released October 7, 2016 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rock - Released June 10, 2016 | Universal Music

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Genre

Rock in the magazine