Albums

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Classical - To be released November 10, 2017 | Arcana

Booklet
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Classical - Released October 13, 2017 | Arcana

Hi-Res Booklet
Less famous—at least these days—than his colleague, “rival” and almost contemporary Giovanni Gabrieli, Giovanni Croce also worked in Venice, but wrote less in the sacred polychoral style and more in madrigals for four or five voices (often profane, carefree and happy) than Gabrieli. That being said, here’s some of his works for eight voices—often polychoral then—released in Venice in 1596 for the motets, and in 1605 for the Sacrae Cantiones, testimonies of his consummate art of melody and harmony. By comparison, the ensembles Voces Suaves—vocal— and Concerto Scirocco—instrumental—have chosen to include some works from the two Gabrielis, Andrea and his nephew Giovanni, and also from Guami and Merulo, all tight contemporaries going from the middle of the XVIth century to the start of the next one. Cornets, sackbuts, viols, dulcians and organs (the one built in 1565 in the Church of Mantua, in which the album is recorded, for that matter) answer to the voices in the very rich and yet intimate acoustics of the place. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 22, 2017 | Arcana

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An ensemble selected from the excellent Capelle of Friedrich August I in Dresden, the Cammer-Musique and its leader, the phenomenal oboist Johann Christian Richter, inspired some of the leading German composers and Italian guests at the court around 1720 to write sonatas in which oboes and bassoon are challenged with extremely expressive and virtuosic parts. This was the time and place in which the largest amount of impressive music with oboe and bassoon as soloists in history was written. German composers such as Heinichen, Zelenka, Fasch and Quantz wrote these pieces in the Italian style, with the typical alternation between singing adagios and brilliant allegros. Telemann composed a sonata with ornamentation and affects inspired by the French style. Lotti, who resided in Dresden between 1717 and 1719, also noticed the outstanding skills of the court’s wind players and wrote his only solo pieces for these instruments there. Vivaldi met Richter during the latter’s visit to Venice in 1716, when he accompanied the Elector to the city, and he too dedicated some remarkable oboe and bassoon solos to the German musician. © Alfredo Bernardini/Arcana
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Classical - Released September 8, 2017 | Arcana

Booklet
During the reign of Duke Galeazzo Maria Sforza (1444-76), Milan experienced an extraordinary musical era. In the 1470s, the Duke set out to form a ‘famous and worthy choir’, recruiting a ‘goodly number of singers from beyond the Alps and from various countries’. He soon assembled a musical ensemble that boasted some of the most celebrated musicians in the Franco-Flemish polyphony of the day, from Italy and beyond. The Duke brought into being a new kind of polyphonic mass, a cycle of motets called missales to replace the traditional ordinarium, with texts attributing special importance to the worship of Our Lady of Grace and Mercy, much beloved by the Sforza family. A masterpiece of the genre is the so-called Missa Galeazescha for five voices, composed by Loyset Compère and performed here by an ensemble inspired by the impressive size of Galeazzo Maria Sforza’s cappella. This recording brings together four vocal-instrumental groups. © Arcana
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Classical - Released September 8, 2017 | Arcana

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One of the most talented singers of the new generation brings to light four gems for soprano and orchestra belonging to the great eighteenth -century tradition of Neapolitan sacred music. The three composers are representative of as many generations of an industrious dynasty: Francesco Feo (1691-1761) was the uncle of Gennaro Manna (1715-79), who in turn was the uncle of Gaetano (1751-1804). Comparison between their scores allows us to observe the extraordinary development from the austerity of the late Baroque to the elegance of the galant style. The Lamentations by the two Mannas were part of the liturgy of Holy Thursday (Officium tenebrarum), whereas Feo’s La sinderesi, a sorrowful meditation on sin and contrition, belongs to the form of the spiritual cantata and points to a private devotional environment. The short and bright Gloria by Gennaro Manna crowns the programme, symbolising the final achievement of a dimension of redemption and eternal salvation. All the pieces are characterised by the typically Neapolitan taste for purity of voice, with restrained virtuosity and radiant expressivity. This is the third instalment of the new series devoted to Neapolitan music, in collaboration with the Neapolitan Centro di Musica Antica - Fondazione Pietà de’ Turchini. © Arcana
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Classical - Released August 25, 2017 | Arcana

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The Bauyn Manuscript, a key collection of seventeenth century harpsichord and other music, displays the influence of various schools of composition on the writing and performance of the great clavecinistes of the mid- seventeenth century. The recording includes works of Chambonnières and Louis Couperin, displaying their different styles which led Le Gallois (1680) to write that "one touched the heart and the other touched the ear", as well as other contemporary composers such as Hardel and d'Anglebert. The Denis harpsichord of 1658 is the extraordinary protagonist of this recording, in which Giulia Nuti explores the expressive capacities of one of the earliest extant French double-manual harpsichords, displaying how instrumental refinement enables performance choices. The approach is that of Giulia Nuti's award-winning first solo recording of eighteenth -century French harpsichord music, Les Sauvages, recorded on the Taskin of 1788, which received a Diapason d'Or. Hearing this music through the voice of the Denis harpsichord accesses the sound world in which these pieces belong and should be understood. © Arcana
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Classical - Released July 7, 2017 | Arcana

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Following a critically acclaimed Vivaldi album (A366), recorder player Lorenzo Cavasanti and his partners – grouped under the name Tripla Concordia – turn their attention to Georg Philipp Telemann, with an original programme that goes beyond the usual canon of his recorder sonatas. Among Telemann’s hundreds of sonatas, his last publication of solos for melody instrument and basso continuo, the XII Solos à violin ou traversière (Hamburg, 1734), contains music of great expressive depth. These twelve works not only sum up the composer’s approach to the solo sonata over several decades, but also reveal his continuing exploration of the genre’s possibilities. Yet they have been unfairly overshadowed by several of his earlier sonata collections. This recording by Lorenzo Cavasanti and the members of Tripla Concordia offers a new perspective on the XII Solos by performing four of them with recorder in place of violin or flute. Such flexibility of instrumentation was characteristic of Telemann, who often sanctioned alternative scorings in his publications. Paired with these works is a sonata preserved in a Brussels manuscript and one from the well-known Essercizii musici. The music’s significance is explored in booklet notes by Telemann scholar Steven Zohn, author of Music for a Mixed Taste: Style, Genre, and Meaning in Telemann’s Instrumental Works (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008). © Outhere Music
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Classical - Released July 7, 2017 | Arcana

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After the success of ‘L’ultimo romano’, his album of music for archlute from the 1718 collection of the Roman composer Giovanni Zamboni, Simone Vallerotonda presents something totally new with his Baroque ‘power trio’ I Bassifondi: ‘Alfabeto falso’. Their debut album is devoted to Italian and Spanish music for guitar and theorbo from the first half of the seventeenth century. A little-known repertory, characterised by rhythmic oddities and harmonic extravagances that challenge those of contemporary jazz. Ordinary ‘alfabeto’ (alphabet) was the system used by guitarists of the period to mark chords: each letter corresponded to a single chord. But, in the ‘false alphabet’, those letters which were marked with a slash indicated chords containing dissonances, often very bold. The trio, comprising guitar/theorbo, percussion instruments and colachon, reconstructs an ensemble typical of the seventeenth century. Breathtaking rhythms, ‘dirty’ chords, improvisations and variations: these are the colours they seek to convey in their sound. The beauty and the challenge of this disc lie precisely in providing an interpretation that respects everything notated in the score, and in the choice of arrangements and timbres. This music sounds modern and perhaps slightly provocative to us, but all of it was written around 1640! © Outhere Music
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Classical - Released June 23, 2017 | Arcana

Booklet
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Classical - Released June 9, 2017 | Arcana

Hi-Res Booklet
The central role of Naples in the history of vocal music has so far overshadowed a rich tradition of instrumental music; only in recent years has musicological research begun bringing it to light once more, demonstrating that Naples also played a crucial role in the field of instrumental music, no less relevant than other centres more often associated with this repertory, such as Rome and Venice. This album presents a voyage of discovery into a musical heritage that is even less known, but of the highest value. The new project conceived by Enrico Gatti focuses on the specific scoring for three or four violins (without viola) and continuo which was so typical of the Neapolitan School. Precious gems are unearthed here (including the only solo violin sonata by Giovanni Carlo Cailò, in its first modern recording), and this programme makes many different exponents of Neapolitan instrumental composition accessible to a wider public, from the generation of Pietro Marchitelli (slightly older than Corelli) and Giovanni Carlo Cailò to Francesco Paolo Supriani, Angelo Ragazzi, Nicola Fiorenza and Leonardo Leo – contemporaries of Bach, Tartini and Locatelli, yet who are revealed as possessing a completely different style, at a time when Naples was one of the great European capitals. The musical forms range from church sonatas in the strict style to concertos of more modern conception, thus providing an enjoyable and varied listening experience. (c) Arcana
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Classical - Released June 9, 2017 | Arcana

Hi-Res Booklet
In spite of his baptismal name, there was nothing of the saint about this Santo Lapis, whose extended international career brings to mind many “Honourable Scoundrels” in the age of Casanova. During his sojourn in the Netherlands (1741-1757), the Bologna-born composer and operatic impresario published such diverse works as a collection of harpsichord sonatas for a young Russian countess and a challenging Stravaganza for a music-loving Dutch lord who used to withdraw his name... (c) Arcana
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Classical - Released May 26, 2017 | Arcana

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released April 28, 2017 | Arcana

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released April 14, 2017 | Arcana

Booklet
It is an important moment in the life of a singer when she is able to confront the standard repertory. After years spent studying theatre and music in Shakespeare’s England under the guidance of musicologist Philip Brett, Jill Feldman recorded two programmes of Henry Purcell’s music in 1992, reissued here as a double CD. Many of the ‘Ayres and Songs’ from Orpheus Britannicus are connected to the English theatrical tradition. In the earliest piece on this CD, ‘From Silent Shades’, and the latest, ‘From Rosy Bow’rs’, we hear one theatrical tradition – placing the voice of truth in the mouth of a madman. In the same way, we hear the wisdom of Touchstone in As You Like It, of Feste in Twelfth Night, and of King Lear’s Fool. This programme, superbly accompanied by lutenist Nigel North, searches for that wisdom throughout. In the Harmonia Sacra recording, Purcell’s sacred hymns are interspersed with his complete organ works played by Davitt Moroney, with whom Jill Feldman had collaboratedever since their meeting in 1975 as part of Philip Brett’s ensemble at Berkeley in California.

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