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£117.49

Progressive Rock - Released November 11, 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

Rhino reissued expanded versions of all the Yes albums in the early days of the new millennium, so this 2013 set doesn't see either a massive sonic upgrade or expansion. Instead, those acclaimed remasters -- including the expansion of Big Generator, which hadn't seen U.S. release prior to this -- are now packaged in mini-LP cardboard sleeves and put into a box with new artwork designed by Roger Dean. Apart from the art, this may not offer hardcore Yes fans anything they don't already have -- that's assuming they didn't opt to purchase an import of Big Generator in the first place -- but this is an easy, attractive, and relatively affordable way to get the band's core catalog in one fell swoop. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
£81.99

Progressive Rock - Released May 26, 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

£45.99

Rock - Released August 25, 2009 | Rhino - Elektra

Yes already had a box set in the first great rush of rock boxes in the late '80s/early '90s. Although it was pretty good, YesYears felt like it was lacking something -- it either needed more rarities, or it needed to tell the story better. Rhino's 2002 box set In a Word takes the latter approach, choosing to present the band's history (including selections from Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman, Howe) in a logical, leisurely way over five discs, sequencing them like one long, cohesive album. The sound is better than YesYears, but not drastically better than the Atlantic reissues of the mid-'90s. There are some rarities, but not many, and nothing of real note to anybody outside of the devoted collector. Its true strength is that it tells the story exceedingly well, with all the chart and radio hits accounted for, along with significant album tracks from their baroque early recordings to their records from the '90s. True, you do need to have a deep interest in Yes to get this -- and, if you do, you'll likely have much of this material already -- but if all you want is one comprehensive Yes album in your collection, this suits the bill. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
£20.99

Rock - Released May 29, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

A new Yes box is like a new Star Trek film. The same core group will buy it/see it whether it's crap or not, resulting in an endless cycle of repackaging that exploits the fans who made the franchises so popular in the first place. Yes have always seemed more of an industry than a band, so it comes as no surprise that their deeply rooted PR machine has dug up another collection of "previously unreleased gems," wrapped it in one of Roger Dean's hippie/sci-fi landscapes, and slapped on an exhaustive booklet of play-by-play anecdotes from fans and fellow musicians. Anyone who has followed the group's prolific history knows that its members have splintered and regrouped so many times that their side projects alone demand the box treatment. The Word Is Live collects performances caught between 1970-1988 -- the years 1972-1975, despite boasting the group's most lauded roster, seem to have never existed here. The band's 2003 reunion tour is also skipped over, focusing instead on the fragmented Big Generator lineup of the late '80s. Rabid fans will no doubt empty their wallets for this admittedly attractive box, but the jury's out on whether or not they'll play it more than once. ~ James Christopher Monger
£18.49

Rock - Released July 28, 2003 | Rhino - Elektra

All of the hits are here, just as they are on every Yes compilation. There are numerous edited versions for either radio or for singles, such as on "America," "It Can Happen," "The Calling," and "Homeworld." In addition, there is a remixed version of "Big Generator" that adds nothing to the original. Disc three offers three acoustic tracks in versions of "Roundabout" and "South Side of the Sky," with a solo Steve Howe six-string read of "Australia." ~ Thom Jurek
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Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Eagle Rock

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Progressive Rock - To be released November 24, 2017 | Rhino

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Rock - Released January 28, 2008 | Rhino - Elektra

With 1971's Fragile having left Yes poised quivering on the brink of what friend and foe acknowledged was the peak of the band's achievement, Close to the Edge was never going to be an easy album to make. Drummer Bill Bruford was already shifting restlessly against Jon Anderson's increasingly mystic/mystifying lyricism, while contemporary reports of the recording sessions depicted bandmate Rick Wakeman, too, as little more than an observer to the vast tapestry that Anderson, Steve Howe, and Chris Squire were creating. For it was vast. Close to the Edge comprised just three tracks, the epic "And You and I" and "Siberian Khatru," plus a side-long title track that represented the musical, lyrical, and sonic culmination of all that Yes had worked toward over the past five years. Close to the Edge would make the Top Five on both sides of the Atlantic, dispatch Yes on the longest tour of its career so far and, if hindsight be the guide, launch the band on a downward swing that only disintegration, rebuilding, and a savage change of direction would cure. The latter, however, was still to come. In 1972, Close to the Edge was a flawless masterpiece. ~ Dave Thompson
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Progressive Rock - To be released November 24, 2017 | Rhino

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Rock - Released June 12, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

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Progressive Rock - Released February 26, 2013 | Rhino - Elektra

In many ways, the extravagance of this package equates the profligacy of the prog rock combo themselves. After all, how else but on a triple-LP collection could one hope to re-create (and/or contain) an adequate sampling of Yes' live presentation? Especially since their tunes typically clocked in in excess of ten minutes. Although they had turned in five studio long-players, the vast majority of Yessongs (1973) is drawn from their three most recent endeavors The Yes Album (1970), Fragile (1971), and Close to the Edge (1972). There are two exceptions, the first being the "Opening (Excerpt from "Firebird Suite")" -- which comes from the 1969 Boston Symphony Orchestra's recording, conducted by Seiji Ozawa. The other is Rick Wakeman's keyboard solo "Excerpts from 'The Six Wives Of Henry VIII'." Yes had just undergone a personnel change shortly after concluding work on Close to the Edge as Bill Bruford (percussion) left to join King Crimson in July of 1972. Bruford can be heard on "Perpetual Change," as well as the medley of "Long Distance Runaround" and "The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)." Enthusiasts keen on various and arguably irrelevant minutia should note the spelling of "praimaturus" as credited on Yessongs. It is slightly different from Fragile, which is denoted as "praematurus." That bit of trivia aside, the new lineup finds Alan White (drums), quite ably filling Bruford's shoes, alongside Jon Anderson (vocals), Steve Howe (guitars), Chris Squire (bass/vocals), and Rick Wakeman (keyboards). One of their trademarks has always been an ability to re-create their often densely layered sound in concert. They effortlessly pull off the tricky chord progressions and changes in time signatures of "Siberian Khatru" and a sublime "Heart of the Sunrise," which unquestionably bests the dexterity of its carefully crafted studio counterpart. Both Howe and Squire's respective solos during "The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)" are highlights as they give the entire unit an opportunity to show off their capacity for dramatic dynamics. The remainder of Yessongs is similarly strong, particularly the note-perfect "Close to the Edge," and the inspired concluding instrumental jam during "Starship Trooper." However, one criticism that can be leveled at the entire Yessongs release is the less than optimal audio quality throughout. The sound is generally muddy with no real fidelity to speak of and an even less precise stereoscape. But until someone goes back to the multi-tracks and remixes them for 21st century ears, this is as good as it gets when documenting Yes during this seminal transition period. ~ Lindsay Planer
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Progressive Rock - Released June 24, 2013 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rock - Released March 22, 2005 | Rhino

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Rock - Released January 14, 2003 | Rhino - Elektra

Yes' second (and least successful) album was a transitional effort; the group trying for a more produced and sophisticated sound through the use of an orchestra. Even so, the results weren't conventional, because the group didn't tone down or turn down its sound. Much of Time and a Word relies on bold, highly animated performances by Bill Bruford, Chris Squire, and Tony Kaye. Additionally, by this time the group was developing a much tauter ensemble than was evident on their first LP, so there's no lack of visceral excitement. "No Opportunity Necessary, No Experience Needed" was a bold opening, a highly amplified, frenzied adaptation of the Richie Havens song, melded with Jerome Moross's title music from the movie The Big Country. Somewhat more successful musically is "Then," which keeps the orchestral accompaniment to a minimum and allows Kaye and Banks to stretch out on organ and guitar. "Everydays" is highlighted by Anderson's ethereal vocals and Kaye's dueting with the orchestra. A surprising amount of the material here seems rather tuneless, but the group was solidifying its sound and, in the process, forcing Banks out of the lineup, despite some beautiful moments for him (and Tony Kaye) on the prettiest parts of "The Prophet," a piece that also contains fragments of music that anticipate Yes' work right up through Tales from Topographic Oceans. "Astral Traveller," as a title, anticipates the themes of future group work, though they still don't have the dexterity to pull off the tempo changes they're trying for. By the time the record was completed, Banks was out of the band, which is why Steve Howe, his successor, ended up pictured on the cover of most editions. ~ Bruce Eder
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Rock - Released September 25, 2000 | Eagle Rock