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Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Universal Music Division Decca Records France

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Le top 6 JAZZ NEWS - The Qobuz Standard
With the robust ambience of Fugazi Hall in San Francisco at his disposal, Thelonious Monk recorded ten unaccompanied tracks over two days to create a long-awaited sequel to his immensely endearing Thelonious Himself long-player. As had become somewhat customary for Monk, he brought with him a healthy sampling from his voluminous back catalog, cover tunes, as well as a few new compositions. What is most immediately striking about these recordings is the rich and accurate sound stage at Fugazi Hall. The overtones are rich and thoughtful in their ability to animate Monk's recreations of some of his most endearing works, such as the pair that opens this set. "Blue Monk" still retains the proud stride and walking blues heritage of previous renderings. Adding a bit of off-tempo improvisation, Monk propels and emphasizes the rhythmic swing even harder. He is obviously also enjoying what he is hearing. The audible maturity guiding Monk through the familiar, albeit offbeat, chord progressions of "Ruby, My Dear" is striking. His nimble reflexes and split-second timing render this version superior. Again, the sound of the hall offers even more to enjoy from this performance. It is unfortunate that the playful solitude of "Round Lights" was never revisited. This freeform composition is framed within a blues structure, yet reveals all of the slightly askew freedom of a Monk original. The recreation of an old 1920s hit, "There's Danger in Your Eyes, Cherie," is another of the highlights from Thelonious Alone in San Francisco that was never recorded again by Monk. The noir qualities are immeasurably enhanced by Monk's oblique phrasings as well as the eerie resonance of the Fugazi. This is an absolute must-own recording -- Monk enthusiast or not. ~ Lindsay Planer
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Jazz - Released February 8, 2013 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
£13.81
£10.26

Jazz - Released February 8, 2013 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
£13.81
£10.26

Jazz - Released February 8, 2013 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
£13.81
£10.26

Jazz - Released February 8, 2013 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
£7.69

Jazz - Released September 23, 2002 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Monk's Dream is the Columbia Records debut release featuring the Thelonious Monk Quartet: Monk (piano), Charlie Rouse (tenor sax), John Ore (bass), and Frankie Dunlop (drums). Jazz scholars and enthusiasts alike also heralded this combo as the best Monk had been involved with for several years. Although he would perform and record supported by various other musicians, the tight -- almost telepathic -- dimensions that these four shared has rarely been equalled in any genre. By the early '60s, bop had become considered passé by artists as well as fans looking for the next musical trend. This is coupled with the fact that discerning Monk fans would have undoubtedly recognized many of these titles from several live recordings issued at the end of his tenure on Riverside. Not to belabor the point, however, but precious few musicians understood the layer upon layer of complexities and challenges that Monk's music created. On tracks such as "Five Spot Blues" and "Bolivar Blues," Rouse and Dunlop demonstrate their uncanny abilities by squeezing in well-placed instrumental fills, while never getting hit by the unpredictable rhythmic frisbees being tossed about by Monk. Augmenting the six quartet recordings are two solo sides: "Just a Gigolo" and "Body and Soul." Most notable about Monk's solo work is how much he retained the same extreme level of intuition throughout the nearly two decades that separate these recordings from his initial renderings in the late '40s. Monk's Dream is recommended, with something for every degree of Monk enthusiast. ~ Lindsay Planer
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Thelonious Monk was having a rough time of it during the latter 1960s. Experiencing health and some economic problems, he was also in dispute with Columbia Records, whose marketing department was trying to re-create him in the image of a rock star (see the cover of Underground). On top of this, he had lost his core rhythm section, bassist Larry Gales and drummer Ben Riley. For his eighth European tour, the pianist hired young, unknown players as accompanists for himself and saxophonist Charlie Rouse: Berklee music school student Nate "Lloyd" Hygelund on bass and 17-year-old drummer Paris Wright -- son of bassist Herman Wright. This date was recorded on the last night of the tour at the 3,800 seat Salle Pleyel (the same theater in which a far lesser-known Monk, playing with a local rhythm section, had bombed badly in 1954), and was filmed for French television broadcast. The members of this band had been able to establish a rapport during their travels, including a stint at Ronnie Scott's in London as well as gigs in Berlin, Cologne, and Italy. The show finds Monk and band playing well -- even if, at times, they are just swinging through the tunes rather than embellishing them. The versions of his classic tunes -- "Ruby My Dear," "Straight, No Chaser," "Light Blue," "Epistrophy," "Crepuscule with Nelly," "Bright Mississippi" -- and others are played with a sophisticated command, if not the experimentation they once contained. Wright is a perfectly capable, hard-swinging hard bop drummer; his chops are impressive -- for his age -- if not exceptional. Hygelund is the perfect timekeeper, always physical and in the pocket, and Rouse, so familiar with his boss' music, plays it so effortlessly and perfectly that at times he seems on autopilot -- save for his angular solo on "Light Blue." Monk, despite his health problems, seems undiminished. While there is no dancing, unpredictable bashing of chords with his elbows, or other theatrics common to his earlier persona, his sense of rhythm, harmony, imagination, and swing is ample. Wright gets a lesson in how it's all done on "Nutty," when the pianist calls out Philly Joe Jones (then a resident of Paris), who, though looking haggard, adds a polyrhythmic thrust to the proceedings that emboldens and energizes Monk. Another spot where we hear the pianist stretch is in his uncharacteristically busy flourishes on "Ruby My Dear." This volume is a welcome addition to Monk's recorded catalog; it adds a fine performance to counter the then-popular critical notion that the great composer and pianist was languishing. ~ Thom Jurek
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Concord Records

Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
£5.19£11.56

Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Concord Records

Distinctions Le top 6 JAZZ NEWS
£10.29

Jazz - Released September 23, 2002 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
The Thelonious Monk Quartet of 1964 (comprised of the pianist-composer, tenor saxophonist Charlie Rouse, bassist Larry Gales, and drummer Ben Riley) is well featured on this excellent set which is augmented by two "new" alternate takes ("April in Paris" and "Pannonica") plus a medley of "Just You, Just Me" and "Liza" that was out previously on a sampler. The unique Monk takes "I Love You Sweetheart of All My Dreams" as a piano solo and otherwise jams tunes with his quartet. Surprisingly only two of the songs ("Pannonica" and "Teo") are his originals, but he reinvents the obscure "Children's Song," "Just You, Just Me," and "April in Paris" so they sound like he wrote them! Easily recommended to Monk fans, this set is just further proof that he never made an unworthy recording. ~ Scott Yanow
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£13.59

Jazz - Released June 16, 2017 | Sam Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
Filmmaker Roger Vadim had the right idea when he chose Art Blakey and his Jazz Messengers to perform the soundtrack to his modern film adaptation of Liaisons dangereuses by Laclos, and the score from Thelonious Monk is just as impressive. Not for its originality, as it is essentially based on revisitings of the pianist's own themes. Superbly exhumed by the Sam Records label (Hi-Res 24-Bit sound and wonderful digital booklet), this groundbreaking New York session of 27 July 1959 brought together around the pianist the saxophonists Charlie Rouse and Barney Wilen, the double-bass player Sam Jones and drummer Art Taylor. A pretty magical session in which a fully-relaxed Monk gives free rein to his two tenor players in particular. A real hidden treasure that ought to be discovered at once. © MD/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£9.08£15.56
£6.75£11.56

Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£7.99

Jazz - Released September 25, 2012 | Efor, S.L

£7.99

Jazz - Released February 14, 2012 | SINETONE AMR