Similar artists

Albums

£10.29

Film Soundtracks - Released October 29, 2001 | Sony Music Media

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£11.56

Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Decca

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£13.99

Film Soundtracks - Released October 27, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Bros.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Capping off the composer's longstanding partnership with producer Irwin Allen, The Towering Inferno is quintessential John Williams -- for better and for worse. There's no denying Williams' uncanny sense of scale. His themes are explosive and emotional, galvanized by massive brass flourishes and soaring string arrangements. But what's missing from The Towering Inferno is any sense of subtlety or nuance. Williams seizes upon the film's larger-than-life drama and wrings every moment for maximum suspense and pathos. It's telling that he would emerge as the composer du jour for George Lucas and Steven Spielberg as they steered American film from deeply personal storytelling to mass-market entertainment. This is music devoid of intimacy and heart. ~ Jason Ankeny
£11.56

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1993 | Geffen

When John Williams received his 29th Academy Award nomination for Schindler's List, he had already won Oscars for Fiddler on the Roof, Jaws, Star Wars, and E.T.: The Extra Terrestrial. He had long been an automatic nominee, but as Hollywood's most honored working composer it was generally believed that it would take an extraordinary addition to his legacy for the Academy to award Williams a fifth trophy. Schindler's List would prove to be that extraordinary work -- and not just because of the enormous historical and social import of the film and it's subject, though those factors could only have strengthened Williams appeal to Academy voters. Schindler's List feels like his attempt at a magnum opus. Though even simpler in its melodies and themes than some of his famous sweeping popcorn movie scores, it carries the ambition of a major symphonic composition. This is especially true in the segments that are graced with exquisitely rich and evocative violin solos by world famous violinist Itzhak Perlman. Perlman's masterful performances give Williams' compositions an authenticity and grounding that offsets the composer's predilection for sentimentality and bombast. "Restraint" was the word that appeared most frequently in discussions of Steven Spielberg's Holocaust epic. The critical consensus was that the director had managed to depict the horrors of the greatest tragedy in world history without giving in to his customary urges to tug transparently at the heart strings of his audiences. In truth, Spielberg was only able to exercise restraint through the first two and a half hours of the film; he ended up throwing it out the window in the maudlin conclusion. Williams, too, is guilty of indulging in emotional excess. Which isn't surprising when you consider that his music has always been one of Spielberg's most effective heart-tugging tools. Like the film itself, his score is best at its simplest, deriving its emotional power from the events it depicts and bearing in mind that audiences do not need help from filmmakers and composers in order to be emotionally affected by the Holocaust. ~ Evan Cater
£10.29

Soundtracks - Released November 8, 2013 | Sony Classical

£10.29

Pop/Rock - Released September 20, 2004 | Sony Classical

£11.56

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2002 | Geffen*

£14.99

Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2008 | Concord Records

With 1981's Raiders of the Lost Ark, John Williams created the most influential and majestic adventure film score of the era. While its 1984 sequel, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, can't possibly wield the same impact, it's nevertheless a rousing effort that cements the legacy of the original while twisting the formula in compelling ways. Like Steven Spielberg's film, Williams' score is darker and more violent than its predecessor, informed by elements of occultism and black magic. Its action sequences are genuinely exciting, complete with breakneck melodies and hairpin rhythms that build to death-defying climaxes. For a second go-round, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom boasts a remarkable vitality. Williams never succumbs to repetition or mere recycling, instead investing his themes with a rapturous joy that's undeniably infectious. ~ Jason Ankeny
£6.49

Classical - Released February 24, 2004 | Sony Classical - Legacy

£11.59

Classical - Released November 18, 1996 | Sony Classical

£11.59

Pop/Rock - Released May 15, 1995 | Sony Classical

£17.69

Classical - Released April 4, 2011 | Sony Classical

THE GUITARIST could be described as a record of brooding reflection and pastoral solitude with echoes of ancient Greece a recurrent motif. It also demonstrates that one can plan a wonderfully varied yet coherent guitar recital without recourse to the usual Bach transcriptions and Spanish chestnuts. No one is better equipped to do this than John Williams. As much an ambassador of the guitar as a player, he puts his commitment to new music for the instrument to good use here, the major dividend being the 'Koyunbaba' of Italian composer Carlo Domeniconi. Inspired by Turkish themes and landscapes, the four-movement suite employs an unusual C sharp minor tuning to haunting, original effect. The 'Stele' of Australian Phillip Houghton are moody evocations of the Greek coastline and ancient monuments to gods, demons and sailors lost at sea, while the 'Epitafios' of Mikis Theodorakis eulogize the more recently departed with the direct simplicity of folk music. Rounded off with a suite of medieval tunes and a particularly successful arrangement of Satie's third 'Gymnopedie,' THE GUITARIST leads one down a darker, less traveled road full of drama and beauty.